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Sources
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Author:   Ancestry.com
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Page:   St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Publication Date: 2/ Apr/ 1997; Publication Place: St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; URL: https://www.newspapers.com/image/141781554/?article=28c6f781-b7ad-4639-94c5-017eb01f4a88&focus=0.03363071,0.83394533,0.14113648,
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32. Title:   Find a Grave
Publication:   Name: Location: http://www.findagrave.com/index.html;;
33. Title:   Find a Grave
Publication:   Name: Location: http://www.findagrave.com/index.html;;
34. Title:   Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800s-current
Page:   St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Publication Date: 2/ Apr/ 1997; Publication Place: St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; URL: https://www.newspapers.com/image/141781554/?article=28c6f781-b7ad-4639-94c5-017eb01f4a88&focus=0.03363071,0.83394533,0.14113648,
Publication:   Name: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Lehi, UT, USA; Date: 2019;;
35. Title:   Find a Grave
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36. Title:   Web: RootsWeb Death Index, 1796-2010
Page:   Database online.
Author:   Ancestry.com
Publication:   Name: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data - Death Records. RootsWeb. http://userdb.rootsweb.ancestry.com/deaths/: accessed 1 January 2012.Original data: Death Records. RootsWeb. http://userdb.rootsweb.ancestry.;;
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40. Title:   Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800s-current
Page:   St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Publication Date: 2/ Apr/ 1997; Publication Place: St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; URL: https://www.newspapers.com/image/141781554/?article=28c6f781-b7ad-4639-94c5-017eb01f4a88&focus=0.03363071,0.83394533,0.14113648,
Publication:   Name: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Lehi, UT, USA; Date: 2019;;
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Publication:   Name: Name: https://www.findagrave.com/;;
42. Title:   1920 USA Federal Census
Page:   Year: 1920; Census Place: Arcadia, Iron, Missouri; Roll: T625_919;Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 18; Image: 944.
Publication:   Name: Name: Bureau of the Census Enumeration Districts 819-839 on roll 323 (Chicago City); Location: Washington, DC;;
43. Title:   1930 USA Federal Census
Page:   Year: 1930; Census Place: Arcadia, Iron, Missouri; Roll: 1191; Page:18B; Enumeration District: 3; Image: 1079.0.
Publication:   Name: Name: Bureau of the Census, National Archives and Records Administration, T626; Location: Washington, D.C.; Date: 1930;;
44. Title:   Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800s-current
Page:   St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Publication Date: 2/ Apr/ 1997; Publication Place: St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; URL: https://www.newspapers.com/image/141781554/?article=28c6f781-b7ad-4639-94c5-017eb01f4a88&focus=0.03363071,0.83394533,0.14113648,
Publication:   Name: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Lehi, UT, USA; Date: 2019;;

Notes
a. Note:   Iron County Register Newspaper, Volume LXV, No. 50, Thursday, April 28, 1932, Page 1, "County School News." Also in Arcadia Valley Enterprise, April 29, 1932, page 4, "County School News." The following article was printed in the Meramec Valley Transcript in Pacific, Missouri on February 13, 1945 regarding his "war years." "A ninth Air Force Engineer Battalion, France-TF Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., and a well known Pacific man, along with others of the Battalion has been awarded the Presidential Distinguished Unit Citation for constructing an emergency strip while under fire on D-Day and an advance landing ground in the Normandy beach head." Source: Transcript Newspaper February 23, 1945 Issue. Per Andrew Amelung, he landed on Utah Beach at Omaha Bluff on D-Day. The following newspaper articles appeared in the Iron County Register Newspaper in Ironton, Missouri and are in the possession of Babe Amelung. A IX Engineer Command Battalion France . . . T-5 Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., is serving with an aviation engineer battalion of the IX Engineer Command which is construction airfields behind the front lines in France. He landed with one of the first detachments of men from this de-battalion which started its operations on the beachhead on the morning of D-day. Amelung "Babe" takes part in invasion of Europe. See 9/29/1944 Transcript Newspaper for article. ---------------- NINTH AIR FORCE ENGINEER BATTALION, France T-5 Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., along with other members if a Ninth air Force Aviation Engineer Battalion, has been awarded the presidential Distinguished Unit Citation for constructing an emergency landing strip while under fire on D Day and an advanced landing ground in the Normandy beachhead. Landing on the beach at H plus three hours on D-Day, advance elements of the battalion found that the area of the proposed site for the strip was still partially occupied by the enemy. But they proceeded on their mission in spite of the obstacles and dangers and worked on the strip while under continuous fire. At one point the engineering equipment was working within 200 yards of active enemy artillery emplacements. The strip was occupied by sundown on D-Day and by the following day the detachment was pushing forward behind the advancing invading troops and beginning work on a field further inland. The field was made operational seven days later for use by U.S. Ninth Air Force fighter-bombers who dive-bombed and strafed enemy strong point in front of the advancing armies. Since that time the battalion has worked with other units of the Ninth Engineer Command in constructing more than 100 airdromes for the air campaign in France. The battalion is commanded by Lt. Col. Max McCroy of Stoubenville, Ohio. T-5 Amelung's father, Mr. Herman Amelung, resides at Pilot Knob, Mo. -------------- A Ninth Engineer Command Battalion, France - Technician Fifth Grade Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., is a member of the 819th Engineer Aviation Battalion which has been released from the censor's list along with six other battalions of the Ninth Engineer Command. A construction worker on airfields, Amelung is serving with the battalion on the Western Front where it is now working on another front-line airfield for the U.S. Ninth Air Force. The battalion, which is commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Max G. McCrory, of Martins Ferry, Ohio, has been constructing and repairing airfields on the continent since D-Day. It was one of the first Ninth Engineer Command units to land in France and has put into service twelve airfields for tactical coordination of the Ninth Air Force. Prior to coming to the continent, the 819th was stationed in the United Kingdom where it built bases for American heavy bombers and escort aircraft. It arrived in England in July 1942. Before entering the service in March 1942, Amelung was employed as a miner at the Pioneer Silica Products Company of Pacific, Missouri. His father, Mr. Herman Amelung resides in Pilot Knob, Missouri. A brother Staff Sergeant Herman Jr. is serving in the infantry, and a brother First Class Henry Amelung is in the Air Corps in England. VARIOUS OLD TIME STORIES: (Told to me by Andrew Amelung) Dad remembered back in Prohibition when the Feds would raid their neighbor, Ma Plummer's house next door. They'd carry the bottles outside and break them all but every now and then, they'd miss one and as they went back inside to gather more, someone would jump the fence and grab the untouched bottle and scamper away with it. Henry Richter had a scar across his neck from ear to ear from a fight he got into one time that didn't kill him. He was a bachelor and Herman Amelung's family would invite him over at Christmas for dinner. He is the one who showed my dad how to skin squirrels "the right way." One time, John Link had a run in with two guys and they had already shot John with a shotgun and was both holding him down. He managed to get his knife out, opened it with his teeth, and killed one and almost killed the other. John Link, who lived on the other side of Knob Creek, was going to butcher a hog. This was sometime after 1936, and Babe, who was about 20 years old then, was going to help him. Well, John was known to have already killed two guys and now here he was mad because he couldn't get his gun to shoot. So he picked up a butcher knife and threw it into the side of the barn and it vibrated back and forth for quite awhile while he went inside to get his shotgun. That's when Babe said it was time to go! He was somewhat leary of the guy being mad and having a gun both. He was a small framed man, not very big at all. ----- My dad, Babe Amelung, commented on one hunting trip way back in the Pilot Knob hills where he and his dog came across a moonshine still. He was about 17 or 18 years old at the time. He had known of a spring in that area and only wanted a drink for himself and his dog. Since stills are not left unguarded, and he didn't see anyone there, he knew that he was being watched so he hurried and got his drink and went on hunting. He said that he never told anyone what he saw and he didn't stop to check it out. ----- Back when he was younger, his brothers and him use to hunt all the time and fish. His sister, Nelle, said that he always carried a Prince Albert can in his pocket full of worms, as he said, "to always be ready.". In the May 1924 photograph you can see Babe (complete with can in pocket) with his sister Nelle and brother Oscar. My dad told me that when he first started at PGS, he was a Mule Skinner making 40 cents an hour and working 10 hours a day ($4.00 a day). There was no such thing back then as time and one half pay. On December 21, 1978, he was presented with a watch for 40 years of service at the Pacific (PGS) plant. He worked there 50 years before retiring with 4 years in the army (WWII). Just before he was drafted into the army, Babe Amelung, had the only new 1942 Chevrolet in Pacific. They stopped making 1942 cars because of the war. He purchased the car new about November 1941 for $1,048.00. He said, "it had fender skirts, spot lights on each side, fog lights and everything else they could throw on to get me to buy it." When he went into the army, his brother Oscar and Martha drove it. ----- OBITUARY: AMELUNG, ANDREW WARREN "BABE", of Pacific, Missouri died Monday afternoon, March 31, 1997 in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Alice May (nee Littrell), dear father of Marcine (Ed) Lohman, Ballwin, MO, Carol Amelung, and Andrew Amelung, Jr. of Pacific, MO, dear brother of Henry (Jackie) Amelung, Ironton, MO and Nelle White, Pilot Knob, Missouri, brother in law to Daisy Amelung and Ed Hall, and dear uncle of Larry (Linda) Amelung, Ironton, MO, Mary (Jerry) James, Cadiz, KY, Maria (Tom) LaPointe, FL, Nancy Amelung, Ellen (Robert) McDarmont, Eustis, FL, and Carole (Larry) Schroer, KY. Babe is preceded in death by three brothers, Herb, Herman and Oscar Amelung, and by one sister, Edna Hall. Babe was born to Herman Henry Christian Amelung and Marie "Mary" Anna Wilhemia Schlueter on July 20, 1916 in Pilot Knob, Missouri and was baptized at the Immanuel Lutheran Church of Pilot Knob. Babe began working at the Pennsylvania Glass & Sand Company in 1936 when sand was still being hauled out of the quarry by mule. To move the sand a mule was attached to a cart which was capable of carrying two and one-half tons of sand. Pacific had four or five of these mules but Babe had the meanest of the lot. According to Babe, "If he couldn't bite you, he'd kick you, and if he couldn't kick you, he'd paw you." When he first started as a Mule Skinner, he made 40 cents an hour and worked 10 hours a day ($4.00 a day). One story he liked to tell of his Mule Skinner days was of how they would flicker the lights in the tunnel when it was quitting time and the mules would automatically come out to the stable. Unfortunately, when there was a thunder storm flickering the lights, the mules didn't seem to think that any different from quitting time and still insisted on leaving for the stables. When Babe returned to the plant after the war, "Bob" and the rest of the stable had been replaced by dump trucks, a move that none of the Mule Skinners regretted. Babe gave the Pacific (PGS) plant 50 years of service before retiring and after that worked there for many more years as a security guard. During W.W.II, Babe served with the 819 Engineer's Battalion in England, France and Germany and participated in the D-Day landing on the Normandy beach head. He spent a total of thirty-nine months in the European Theatre. Returning to Pacific in 1946, Babe resumed his duties in the quarry, this time as a Shovel Operator. Although the Army had taken Babe out of the country, you couldn't take the country out of Babe. While in Europe, he continued his hunting, bringing in a variety of game for the mess hall to cook up. Apparently even language was no barrier - while in France, a hunting party who spoke no English, met up with Babe and included him in their wild pig/boar hunt. He donated his game to the other hunters who were quite grateful for the extra help. Babe always carried a "lucky" silver dollar in his pocket that his brother Oscar gave him before W.W. II. He carried that silver dollar so long he wore it smooth and it only seemed right that he continue carrying it with him up to the Pearly Gates. The coin and his masonic rings were buried with him along with his favorite chewing tobacco. Babe was a member of the Masonic Lodge No. 534 and the American Legion Post No. 320 in Pacific. Babe's hobbies included coon, rabbit and squirrel hunting, vacations were usually spent deer hunting, and he has pulled quite a few Bass, Jack Salmon and Catfish out of the Meramec River in Pacific. In his younger days in Pilot Knob, he would carry a Prince Albert can in his pocket full of worms as he said "to always be ready." He was an avid story teller who's adventures included coming upon a moonshine still up in the Pilot Knob mountains during Prohibition time to the ghost his brothers and he saw up on Shepard Mountain one night while coon hunting. Babe passed away just a few minutes after returning home from visiting his brother and sister in Ironton/Pilot Knob. Funeral services were held Thursday, April 3, 1997 at Bell Funeral Home. Interment at Midlawn Cemetery in Union, MO. Pallbearers were Larry Amelung, Andy Amelung, Edward Lohman, Eddie Myers, Lawrence Littrell and Joe "Bootie" Capestro. ----- GHOST ON SHEPARD MOUNTAIN (This is exactly how he told it to me!) One night we was night hunting, moonlit night, so we're way back there on Shephard Mountain (me, Herman and Oscar). We're rolling along and the first thing you know there's this big white thing way up in the air swinging. We each one started looking at the other, all we had was a axe. That's all we use to carry at night hunting...didn't carry a gun. So we didn't know what to do. Finally Herman said, "We better check it out cause ain't no one going to believe us if we go back and tell them there's a big white ghost in a tree." So up to the tree we go. Come to find out, a big white billy goat had climbed up in that Hickory tree and hung itself and he was hanging up there by his head swinging, way up 20 feet off the ground. There was no way anybody could of hung him up there. He'd had to climb up there himself and fell out or something. We checked down under him for traps and that to see whether somebody had traps set to catch something. But there were no traps, he was just dead. It looked kind of funny though. "Yea, if that had been me and Oscar, we would probably have cut a trail and left that dude hanging up there. We wasn't too old and was still going to school." Herman would always talk us into going with him, he was the one who had the dog. [Marcine's Note: His sister Nelle seems to remember that they ran all the way home that night and didn't go check it out until the next day when it was daylight . . . but who knows that was a long time ago. ] "That's where I got the Poison Ivy and almost died. The light went out and we had no light. We was trying to get home and get down off the hill and fell or rolled and got cut and all. It was dark and I guess I fell and rolled in it. My head swelled up big around, eyes swelled shut, mouth swelled shut, and both hands were solid blisters.: I had to suck soup through a straw - that was the only way I could eat. I also missed the last quarter of school. Back then they didn't know what to do for you. It just had to play itself out. Then whenever it started healing up, my whole face was just a solid scab. I was a hard looker. No more hunting that winter. They thought I was going to kick the bucket and I thought I was too. They didn't have shots back then like we do now for it. The best thing we found for it back then was Lysol cleaner. But the Lysol then is different from what we have now. The Lysol we have now is no good for it. The Lysol then, if you used it straight, would blister you. We'd take a saucer, put some water in it, and then put just a few drops of that Lysol in the water and that water would get real milky. We'd make it just strong enough that it would burn a little when you put it on. It would kill it right out. One day, Herman came in, he had a little Poison Ivy on his stomach and he knew we had been using the Lysol but he didn't know we had been diluting it. So he just takes the bottle and dabs a little on there and he had a great big blister on his stomach. It burned him up. ----- Did you know . . . To find out who was stealing their wood they would put dynamite caps in a piece of wood and cover the hole up and then sit back and wait to see who's stove would blow up. That's how they found out who was stealing their fire wood. To understand how it was, there was no law inforcement in Pilot Knob, the law was in Ironton and no one would call them. It was not uncommon to see guys start fighting on one side of town and finish on the other side of town. To cure a dog cough - this recipe came from an old man who was part indian. Dig up some Polk Root and skin it, cut it up and fry in in a lot of grease. Then serve it grease and all to the dog. Polk Root is poisonous, but when prepared this way it takes care of the cough and not the dog.
 Iron County Register Newspaper, Volume LXV, No. 50, Thursday, April 28, 1932, Page 1, "County School News." Also in Arcadia Valley Enterprise, April 29, 1932, page 4, "County School News."
  The following article was printed in the Meramec Valley Transcript in Pacific, Missouri on February 13, 1945 regarding his "war years."
  "A ninth Air Force Engineer Battalion, France-TF Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., and a well known Pacific man, along with others of the Battalion has been awarded the Presidential Distinguished Unit Citation for constructing an emergency strip while under fire on D-Day and an advance landing ground in the Normandy beach head."
 Source: Transcript Newspaper February 23, 1945 Issue.
  Per Andrew Amelung, he landed on Utah Beach at Omaha Bluff on D-Day.
  The following newspaper articles appeared in the Iron County Register Newspaper in Ironton, Missouri and are in the possession of Babe Amelung.
  A IX Engineer Command Battalion France . . . T-5 Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., is serving with an aviation engineer battalion of the IX Engineer Command which is construction airfields behind the front lines in France.
  He landed with one of the first detachments of men from this de-battalion which started its operations on the beachhead on the morning of D-day.
  Amelung "Babe" takes part in invasion of Europe. See 9/29/1944 Transcript Newspaper for article.
  ----------------
  NINTH AIR FORCE ENGINEER BATTALION, France
  T-5 Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., along with other members if a Ninth air Force Aviation Engineer Battalion, has been awarded the presidential Distinguished Unit Citation for constructing an emergency landing strip while under fire on D Day and an advanced landing ground in the Normandy beachhead.
  Landing on the beach at H plus three hours on D-Day, advance elements of the battalion found that the area of the proposed site for the strip was still partially occupied by the enemy. But they proceeded on their mission in spite of the obstacles and dangers and worked on the strip while under continuous fire. At one point the engineering equipment was working within 200 yards of active enemy artillery emplacements.
  The strip was occupied by sundown on D-Day and by the following day the detachment was pushing forward behind the advancing invading troops and beginning work on a field further inland. The field was made operational seven days later for use by U.S. Ninth Air Force fighter-bombers who dive-bombed and strafed enemy strong point in front of the advancing armies.
  Since that time the battalion has worked with other units of the Ninth Engineer Command in constructing more than 100 airdromes for the air campaign in France. The battalion is commanded by Lt. Col. Max McCroy of Stoubenville, Ohio. T-5 Amelung's father, Mr. Herman Amelung, resides at Pilot Knob, Mo.
  --------------
  A Ninth Engineer Command Battalion, France - Technician Fifth Grade Andrew W. Amelung of Pilot Knob, Mo., is a member of the 819th Engineer Aviation Battalion which has been released from the censor's list along with six other battalions of the Ninth Engineer Command.
  A construction worker on airfields, Amelung is serving with the battalion on the Western Front where it is now working on another front-line airfield for the U.S. Ninth Air Force.
  The battalion, which is commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Max G. McCrory, of Martins Ferry, Ohio, has been constructing and repairing airfields on the continent since D-Day. It was one of the first Ninth Engineer Command units to land in France and has put into service twelve airfields for tactical coordination of the Ninth Air Force.
  Prior to coming to the continent, the 819th was stationed in the United Kingdom where it built bases for American heavy bombers and escort aircraft. It arrived in England in July 1942.
  Before entering the service in March 1942, Amelung was employed as a miner at the Pioneer Silica Products Company of Pacific, Missouri. His father, Mr. Herman Amelung resides in Pilot Knob, Missouri. A brother Staff Sergeant Herman Jr. is serving in the infantry, and a brother First Class Henry Amelung is in the Air Corps in England.
  VARIOUS OLD TIME STORIES: (Told to me by Andrew Amelung)
  Dad remembered back in Prohibition when the Feds would raid their neighbor, Ma Plummer's house next door. They'd carry the bottles outside and break them all but every now and then, they'd miss one and as they went back inside to gather more, someone would jump the fence and grab the untouched bottle and scamper away with it.
  Henry Richter had a scar across his neck from ear to ear from a fight he got into one time that didn't kill him. He was a bachelor and Herman Amelung's family would invite him over at Christmas for dinner. He is the one who showed my dad how to skin squirrels "the right way."
  One time, John Link had a run in with two guys and they had already shot John with a shotgun and was both holding him down. He managed to get his knife out, opened it with his teeth, and killed one and almost killed the other.
  John Link, who lived on the other side of Knob Creek, was going to butcher a hog. This was sometime after 1936, and Babe, who was about 20 years old then, was going to help him. Well, John was known to have already killed two guys and now here he was mad because he couldn't get his gun to shoot. So he picked up a butcher knife and threw it into the side of the barn and it vibrated back and forth for quite awhile while he went inside to get his shotgun. That's when Babe said it was time to go! He was somewhat leary of the guy being mad and having a gun both. He was a small framed man, not very big at all.
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 My dad, Babe Amelung, commented on one hunting trip way back in the Pilot Knob hills where he and his dog came across a moonshine still. He was about 17 or 18 years old at the time. He had known of a spring in that area and only wanted a drink for himself and his dog. Since stills are not left unguarded, and he didn't see anyone there, he knew that he was being watched so he hurried and got his drink and went on hunting. He said that he never told anyone what he saw and he didn't stop to check it out.
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  Back when he was younger, his brothers and him use to hunt all the time and fish. His sister, Nelle, said that he always carried a Prince Albert can in his pocket full of worms, as he said, "to always be ready.". In the May 1924 photograph you can see Babe (complete with can in pocket) with his sister Nelle and brother Oscar.
  My dad told me that when he first started at PGS, he was a Mule Skinner making 40 cents an hour and working 10 hours a day ($4.00 a day). There was no such thing back then as time and one half pay.
  On December 21, 1978, he was presented with a watch for 40 years of service at the Pacific (PGS) plant. He worked there 50 years before retiring with 4 years in the army (WWII).
  Just before he was drafted into the army, Babe Amelung, had the only new 1942 Chevrolet in Pacific. They stopped making 1942 cars because of the war. He purchased the car new about November 1941 for $1,048.00. He said, "it had fender skirts, spot lights on each side, fog lights and everything else they could throw on to get me to buy it." When he went into the army, his brother Oscar and Martha drove it.
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  OBITUARY: AMELUNG, ANDREW WARREN "BABE", of Pacific, Missouri died Monday afternoon, March 31, 1997 in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Alice May (nee Littrell), dear father of Marcine (Ed) Lohman, Ballwin, MO, Carol Amelung, and Andrew Amelung, Jr. of Pacific, MO, dear brother of Henry (Jackie) Amelung, Ironton, MO and Nelle White, Pilot Knob, Missouri, brother in law to Daisy Amelung and Ed Hall, and dear uncle of Larry (Linda) Amelung, Ironton, MO, Mary (Jerry) James, Cadiz, KY, Maria (Tom) LaPointe, FL, Nancy Amelung, Ellen (Robert) McDarmont, Eustis, FL, and Carole (Larry) Schroer, KY. Babe is preceded in death by three brothers, Herb, Herman and Oscar Amelung, and by one sister, Edna Hall.
  Babe was born to Herman Henry Christian Amelung and Marie "Mary" Anna Wilhemia Schlueter on July 20, 1916 in Pilot Knob, Missouri and was baptized at the Immanuel Lutheran Church of Pilot Knob.
  Babe began working at the Pennsylvania Glass & Sand Company in 1936 when sand was still being hauled out of the quarry by mule. To move the sand a mule was attached to a cart which was capable of carrying two and one-half tons of sand. Pacific had four or five of these mules but Babe had the meanest of the lot. According to Babe, "If he couldn't bite you, he'd kick you, and if he couldn't kick you, he'd paw you." When he first started as a Mule Skinner, he made 40 cents an hour and worked 10 hours a day ($4.00 a day).
  One story he liked to tell of his Mule Skinner days was of how they would flicker the lights in the tunnel when it was quitting time and the mules would automatically come out to the stable. Unfortunately, when there was a thunder storm flickering the lights, the mules didn't seem to think that any different from quitting time and still insisted on leaving for the stables. When Babe returned to the plant after the war, "Bob" and the rest of the stable had been replaced by dump trucks, a move that none of the Mule Skinners regretted.
  Babe gave the Pacific (PGS) plant 50 years of service before retiring and after that worked there for many more years as a security guard.
  During W.W.II, Babe served with the 819 Engineer's Battalion in England, France and Germany and participated in the D-Day landing on the Normandy beach head. He spent a total of thirty-nine months in the European Theatre. Returning to Pacific in 1946, Babe resumed his duties in the quarry, this time as a Shovel Operator.
  Although the Army had taken Babe out of the country, you couldn't take the country out of Babe. While in Europe, he continued his hunting, bringing in a variety of game for the mess hall to cook up. Apparently even language was no barrier - while in France, a hunting party who spoke no English, met up with Babe and included him in their wild pig/boar hunt. He donated his game to the other hunters who were quite grateful for the extra help.
  Babe always carried a "lucky" silver dollar in his pocket that his brother Oscar gave him before W.W. II. He carried that silver dollar so long he wore it smooth and it only seemed right that he continue carrying it with him up to the Pearly Gates. The coin and his masonic rings were buried with him along with his favorite chewing tobacco.
  Babe was a member of the Masonic Lodge No. 534 and the American Legion Post No. 320 in Pacific.
  Babe's hobbies included coon, rabbit and squirrel hunting, vacations were usually spent deer hunting, and he has pulled quite a few Bass, Jack Salmon and Catfish out of the Meramec River in Pacific. In his younger days in Pilot Knob, he would carry a Prince Albert can in his pocket full of worms as he said "to always be ready." He was an avid story teller who's adventures included coming upon a moonshine still up in the Pilot Knob mountains during Prohibition time to the ghost his brothers and he saw up on Shepard Mountain one night while coon hunting.
  Babe passed away just a few minutes after returning home from visiting his brother and sister in Ironton/Pilot Knob.
  Funeral services were held Thursday, April 3, 1997 at Bell Funeral Home. Interment at Midlawn Cemetery in Union, MO. Pallbearers were Larry Amelung, Andy Amelung, Edward Lohman, Eddie Myers, Lawrence Littrell and Joe "Bootie" Capestro.
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  GHOST ON SHEPARD MOUNTAIN (This is exactly how he told it to me!)
  One night we was night hunting, moonlit night, so we're way back there on Shephard Mountain (me, Herman and Oscar). We're rolling along and the first thing you know there's this big white thing way up in the air swinging. We each one started looking at the other, all we had was a axe. That's all we use to carry at night hunting...didn't carry a gun. So we didn't know what to do. Finally Herman said, "We better check it out cause ain't no one going to believe us if we go back and tell them there's a big white ghost in a tree."
  So up to the tree we go. Come to find out, a big white billy goat had climbed up in that Hickory tree and hung itself and he was hanging up there by his head swinging, way up 20 feet off the ground. There was no way anybody could of hung him up there. He'd had to climb up there himself and fell out or something. We checked down under him for traps and that to see whether somebody had traps set to catch something. But there were no traps, he was just dead. It looked kind of funny though. "Yea, if that had been me and Oscar, we would probably have cut a trail and left that dude hanging up there. We wasn't too old and was still going to school." Herman would always talk us into going with him, he was the one who had the dog.
  [Marcine's Note: His sister Nelle seems to remember that they ran all the way home that night and didn't go check it out until the next day when it was daylight . . . but who knows that was a long time ago. ]
  "That's where I got the Poison Ivy and almost died. The light went out and we had no light. We was trying to get home and get down off the hill and fell or rolled and got cut and all. It was dark and I guess I fell and rolled in it. My head swelled up big around, eyes swelled shut, mouth swelled shut, and both hands were solid blisters.:
  I had to suck soup through a straw - that was the only way I could eat. I also missed the last quarter of school.
  Back then they didn't know what to do for you. It just had to play itself out. Then whenever it started healing up, my whole face was just a solid scab. I was a hard looker. No more hunting that winter. They thought I was going to kick the bucket and I thought I was too.
  They didn't have shots back then like we do now for it. The best thing we found for it back then was Lysol cleaner. But the Lysol then is different from what we have now. The Lysol we have now is no good for it. The Lysol then, if you used it straight, would blister you. We'd take a saucer, put some water in it, and then put just a few drops of that Lysol in the water and that water would get real milky. We'd make it just strong enough that it would burn a little when you put it on. It would kill it right out.
  One day, Herman came in, he had a little Poison Ivy on his stomach and he knew we had been using the Lysol but he didn't know we had been diluting it. So he just takes the bottle and dabs a little on there and he had a great big blister on his stomach. It burned him up.
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  Did you know . . .
  To find out who was stealing their wood they would put dynamite caps in a piece of wood and cover the hole up and then sit back and wait to see who's stove would blow up. That's how they found out who was stealing their fire wood.
  To understand how it was, there was no law enforcement in Pilot Knob, the law was in Ironton and no one would call them. It was not uncommon to see guys start fighting on one side of town and finish on the other side of town.
  To cure a dog cough - this recipe came from an old man who was part indian. Dig up some Polk Root and skin it, cut it up and fry in in a lot of grease. Then serve it grease and all to the dog. Polk Root is poisonous, but when prepared this way it takes care of the cough and not the dog.


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