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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. James7 Carl DAUGHTERTY: Birth: 8 JUL 1900 in Ladoga, Montgomery County, Indiana. Death: 27 SEP 1976 in Indianapolis, Indiana

  2. Anna7 Scott DAUGHTERTY: Birth: 7 DEC 1902 in Ladoga, Montgomery County, Indiana. Death: 1979 in Prospect, Kentucky

  3. Matilda7 Jane DAUGHERTY: Birth: BET 1903 AND 1915 in unknown. Death: BEF 2003 in unknown

  4. Andrew7 Jackson DAUGHTERTY: Birth: 20 APR 1907 in Ladoga, Montgomery County, Indiana. Death: 1973 in Virginia Beach, Virgina

  5. Letha7 Rachel DAUGHTERTY: Birth: 17 DEC 1912 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: 17 JAN 1955 in Indianapolis, Indiana


Sources
1. Title:   World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1
Page:   Tree #0447
Author:   Br�derbund Software, Inc.
Publication:   Release date: September 15, 1997

Notes
a. Note:   [Br�derbund WFT European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Tree #0447, Date of Import: Mar 22, 2003]
  Harry E. Daugherty was of Irish-German descent. He owned very successful veneer mills, first in Ladoga, IN, then in Indianapolis. One source said he was born 3 Nov 1870. He and Letha lost their first baby after two years of marriage. Three years after that/after 5 years of marriage, Carl was born in 1990. He and Letha lived in Ladoga until 1912, when a veneer mill he owned burned. They then moved to Indianapolis and began another mill. All of Letha's relatives were already living there. Their youngest daughter, Letha, was born at 3614 No. Illinois Street. The family next moved to 3440 N. Central, which no longer stands. It was razed to make room for the parking lot for Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. Harry donated the wood for the pews. 1900 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 393 - Vol 54, ED 100, Sheet 1, Line 96): HARRY, Mar, 1870, 30, m. 4, IN/IN/OH, Bank bookeeper; LEATHA, May 1874, 26, m. 4, 0/0, IN/IN/IN They continued to live in Ladoga until 1912, when a veneer mill which Harry owned burned. They moved to 3614 N. Illinois Street, Indianapolis, and started another mill. 1920 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 452 - Vol 65, ED 82, Sheet 1, Line 30): 3440 Central Avenue, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN; HARRY E DAUGHERTYY, 49, IN/OH/OH, Manufactures furniture; LETHA, 45, IN/IN/IN; JAMES C., 19, Shipping clerk, furniture; ANNA, 17; MATILDA, 15; ANDREW J., 12; LETHA R., 7; RACHAEL, 73, widow, OH/PA/PA; ORA RICHMOND, servant, 43, widow, KY/KY/KY, Cook private home Matilda "Til" Daugherty Linn (1993) said, "Our parents always entertained a lot, especially Dad's business acquaintances. It was good training for us children, learning how to relate to people from other places and countries." About their black cook, she said, "Ora was such a lady, sweet and old fashioned and clean. She always bathed and put on a clean dress before dinner. She made delicious cakes and mixed the batter by hand, the old fashioned way." A deer head in the "3440" home was sent to Harry Daugherty by a Daugherty who had settled in the West as a rancher. He was one of Teddy Roosevelt's guides on trips West. His name may have been Galt, and he may have been a nephew by marriage to a Daugherty woman. Matilda Daugherty Linn (1993) also said that her Grandma Rachel, with Josiah and baby Harry took the train to visit relatives in Kansas. The "3440" house was razed to make a parking lot for Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. Harry Daugherty, with no more education than Ladoga Normal School, had the intelligence and initiative to enter into business, succeed, respond to traumatic setbacks, and come right back. At the end of his life in 1938, he bestowed the Hoosier Veneer Company in Indianapolis to his five children, thus leaving them with a legacy of security that helped sustain them and also helped launch his grandchildren into their own lives. [Br�derbund WFT European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Tree #0447, Date of Import: Dec 30, 2003]
  Harry E. Daugherty was of Irish-German descent. He owned very successful veneer mills, first in Ladoga, IN, then in Indianapolis. One source said he was born 3 Nov 1870. He and Letha lost their first baby after two years of marriage. Three years after that/after 5 years of marriage, Carl was born in 1990. He and Letha lived in Ladoga until 1912, when a veneer mill he owned burned. They then moved to Indianapolis and began another mill. All of Letha's relatives were already living there. Their youngest daughter, Letha, was born at 3614 No. Illinois Street. The family next moved to 3440 N. Central, which no longer stands. It was razed to make room for the parking lot for Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. Harry donated the wood for the pews. 1900 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 393 - Vol 54, ED 100, Sheet 1, Line 96): HARRY, Mar, 1870, 30, m. 4, IN/IN/OH, Bank bookeeper; LEATHA, May 1874, 26, m. 4, 0/0, IN/IN/IN They continued to live in Ladoga until 1912, when a veneer mill which Harry owned burned. They moved to 3614 N. Illinois Street, Indianapolis, and started another mill. 1920 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 452 - Vol 65, ED 82, Sheet 1, Line 30): 3440 Central Avenue, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN; HARRY E DAUGHERTYY, 49, IN/OH/OH, Manufactures furniture; LETHA, 45, IN/IN/IN; JAMES C., 19, Shipping clerk, furniture; ANNA, 17; MATILDA, 15; ANDREW J., 12; LETHA R., 7; RACHAEL, 73, widow, OH/PA/PA; ORA RICHMOND, servant, 43, widow, KY/KY/KY, Cook private home Matilda "Til" Daugherty Linn (1993) said, "Our parents always entertained a lot, especially Dad's business acquaintances. It was good training for us children, learning how to relate to people from other places and countries." About their black cook, she said, "Ora was such a lady, sweet and old fashioned and clean. She always bathed and put on a clean dress before dinner. She made delicious cakes and mixed the batter by hand, the old fashioned way." A deer head in the "3440" home was sent to Harry Daugherty by a Daugherty who had settled in the West as a rancher. He was one of Teddy Roosevelt's guides on trips West. His name may have been Galt, and he may have been a nephew by marriage to a Daugherty woman. Matilda Daugherty Linn (1993) also said that her Grandma Rachel, with Josiah and baby Harry took the train to visit relatives in Kansas. The "3440" house was razed to make a parking lot for Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. Harry Daugherty, with no more education than Ladoga Normal School, had the intelligence and initiative to enter into business, succeed, respond to traumatic setbacks, and come right back. At the end of his life in 1938, he bestowed the Hoosier Veneer Company in Indianapolis to his five children, thus leaving them with a legacy of security that helped sustain them and also helped launch his grandchildren into their own lives.


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