Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Mary4 ORECKOVSKY: Birth: 7 JUN 1888 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 9 AUG 1975 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota

  2. Abram4 Charles ORECK: Birth: 11 JUL 1889 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 2 JAN 1979 in Phoenix, Arizona

  3. Israel4 (Tokie) ORECK: Birth: 14 SEP 1892 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 17 SEP 1973 in Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, California

  4. Eva4 ORECKOVSKY: Birth: 1 MAY 1894 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 5 MAR 1976 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota

  5. James6 Richard ORECK: Birth: 8 MAY 1899 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 3 MAR 1982 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota

  6. Irving4 Samuel ORECKOVSKY: Birth: 7 JUL 1910 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Death: 29 JUN 1927 in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota


Sources
1. Title:   World Family Tree European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1
Page:   Tree #0447
Author:   Br�derbund Software, Inc.
Publication:   Release date: September 15, 1997
2. Title:   OneWorldTree

Notes
a. Note:   [Br�derbund WFT European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Tree #0447, Date of Import: Mar 22, 2003]
  In 1883, Joseph Oreckovsky, 19, and his brother, Israel (later Israel Bright), 23, arrived on the east coast of America. They were the first in our family to come from the Russian Empire, and among the first arrivals from eastern Europe in Duluth, Minnesota. Awaiting word from them were their kin in Revutskoe, Novoukrainka and other villages outside of Elisavetgrad, in the Russian Empire. THE YEARS BEFORE WE CAME TO AMERICA: In 1751, Empress Elizabeth of Russia built a fortress between Kiev and Odessa, on a bluff overlooking the river flowing south to the Black Sea. A trading post and village of Elisavetgrad sprang up. On a fertile, elevated plain, the area's excellent climate, productive soil, and good river transportation to Nikolaev and Odessa on the Black Sea became the basis for flourishing grain, livestock, hide, and sugar industries there. The native peasant farmers - Ukrainians, Cossacks, and Russians - were joined by immigrant Serbs, Valaches, Moldavians, Greeks, Bulgarians, Hungarians, Germans, Italians, and French, all eager to work the verdant soil. Many Jews arrived, commonly to engage in their traditional role of trading in agricultural products, and to add to the commercial and cultural well-being of the community. They came by trade routes from Poland, Germany, Austria, Turkey, and Greece. In 1850, Elisavetgrad had three synagogues and numerous Jewish schools and social institutions. That year, decrees were issued to restrict construction of Jewish homes to separate blocks, and to tax Jews on their traditional clothing. In 1855, Alexander II, became Czar of Russia. Known as the "czar liberator", he emancipated the serfs, and he made life much easier for Jews. This accelerated Jewish migration to Elisavetgrad (now Kirovograd) and nearby villages, where our relatives lived. Toward the end of the 1800s, Elisavetgrad's 28,000 Jews were one third of its population and largely responsible for its industry, education, and culture. The Jewish community supported a library, two vocational schools and ten prayer schools, or cheders. During this time, Jews built the first performing arts theatre in the Ukraine. It still stands. Revutskoye, Tishkovka, Novoukrainka, Bobrinets, Zlatopol, near Yelisavetgrad - this region is where the Oreckovskys and many of our relatives lived when, in 1881, liberal Czar Alexander II was asassinated. Reactionary Alexander III promptly cancelled his father's liberal acts and embarked upon programs of suppression. Elisavetgrad, one of the most visible centers of Jewish prosperity and culture, became the target of the first of many pogroms - government sponsored anti-Semitic riots by still-poor peasants and worried landowners, who had blamed the Jews for all the social problems. It was then that the two Oreckovsky sons were sent to explore for a new family home in North America. THE FIRST ORECKOVSKYS IN AMERICA (Excerpts from the Oreck Family News, 1993, by Ralph Oxman): Our first arrivals here were Joseph Oreckovsky and his brother, Israel (later Israel Bright), sons of Samuel and Esther Bazelon Oreckovsky. They arrived in Montreal, Canada [perhaps 1882, more likely 1883]. They worked their way toward Lake Superior along the construction of the new Canadian Pacific railway spur. Joe sold clothing; Israel, watches to the workers. Arriving at Fort William on Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, they set out for Duluth along frozen Lake Superior. Suffering from frostbite after 75 miles, they stayed over in Grand Marais, Minnesota, a portaging outpost for travellers crossing La Superior. In the Spring, they continued by boat on to Duluth. EARLY HISTORY OF THE FAMILY AS REPORTED BY ABE ORECK (Excerpted from the Oreck Family News, October 1959): This earlier story says that Joseph and Israel arrived first in New York, then went to Montreal. Joseph was single; Israel's wife and son were waiting in Russia. In Montreal they bought dry goods for peddling and, with backpacks full, they travelled the path of the new Canadian Pacific railway being built from Montreal to the area of Port Arthur, Fort William, and Grand Portage, on Thunder Bay, Canada. So in the Fall [of 1883], after walking from construction camp to camp, almost all the way from Montreal to Port Arthur, they reached Lake Superior. They had hoped to walk the lake's ice 200 miles on to Duluth, but Joe's feet and legs started to freeze. This version tells that Israel got Joe back to Port Arthur, where he remained in the hospital several months. One story is that the Native Americans assisted them off the lake and helped take care of them until Spring warmed up. (Miriam Oreck Long, 1993) In the Spring, [1884], they took the first boat on to Duluth, where they found six or eight Jewish families, including the Bernard Silbersteins and Ike Freimuths. Joe soon opened a small tailoring and pressing shop, and Israel started a watch repair and small jewelry store in West Duluth. Within a year they sent tickets for their parents, Schmeel and Esther Bazelon Oreckovsky, and the children - Gabe, Louie, Sara, and Elsa. Israel sent for his wife, Lena, and son, Sol. Hannah Oreckovsky, 16, came with them, and married Joseph, her first cousin, a few months later. Schmeel opened a tailor and pressing shop "in Superior". It was recently [1993] discovered that younger brother Gabriel's official citizenship documents record that he also arrived in Duluth at the same time as Joseph and Israel, June 1884. Gabe himself is not known to have said this, and it is was never part of our family's oral tradition. Either Gabe arrived by a different route, or, more likely, documents are incorrect and he arrived later, as told in early stories. APPLICATION FOR CITIZENSHIP (Microfilm 6, Code 11, Vol I, Pg 255/256, Duluth Library): On 30 Jan 1888, "JOSOPH ORECKOVSKY", "ISSRAIL ORECKOVSKY", and "GABEREAL ORECKOVSKY" applied together for U.S. citizenship at the 11th U.S. District Court, St. Louis County, Duluth, Minnesota. Joseph said he was born in "Russia in 1864" and "landed at the port of Duluth in June 1884." Israel's and Gabriel's documents confirmed they all arrived together in 1884, Israel having been born in 1861, Gabriel 1867. U.S. CITIZENSHIP (Microfilm 31, Code 75, Vol 6, Pg 111, Duluth Library): "JOSUPH ORECKOSKY" had declared his intention for citizenship 30 Jan 1888; signed 18 June 1897. His brother, Israel, became a citizen 6 Nov 1899, along with "Big Joe" Oreckovsky and Joseph "Eedel" Sosnovsky. 1882-1883 and 1884-1885 Duluth City Directory: (NO Oreckovsky found) "Not long after settling in Duluth, "Joseph acquired a group of frame flats on Lake Avenue and First Street. After his marriage to Hannah, one of these units became their home.." (Ralph Oxman, from the Oreck Family News, February 1993)
  1886-1887 Duluth Directory: ISAAC ORECKOVSKY, [Isaac and Zelda/Edith, and perhaps their son, Israel] rooms 20 First ave W.; ISAAC ORECKOVSKY, [Israel, age 25, son of Samuel and Esther] laborer, res 216 Lake ave S.; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, [age 21, son of Samuel and Esther] clothes cleaner, dyers and scourers, 216 Lake ave S., res same 1887-1888 Duluth Directory: ISAAC ORECOVSKY, lab, bds 216 Lake ave S; JOSEPH ORECOVSKY, tailor, H LeRoy, res. 216 Lake Av S; LESA ORECOVSKY, mens furnishing goods, 112 Third Rice's Point, res same; SAMUEL ORECOVSKY, tailor, John Ley & Co., res 216 Lake Ave S; MRS. SAMUEL ORECOVSKY, (John Ley & Co.) res. 216 Lake Ave S; (In 1887-88, no Shapiros, Sosnovskys, Schwartzbeins, or Boznus were found.) 1888-1889 Duluth Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 25 W. Superior Street (residence same); SAMUEL ORECKOVSKY [Joseph & Israel's father], tailor, 216 Lake Ave So; ISAAC ORECKOVSKY [Israel & Lena], jeweler, 112 3rd, Rice's Point (residence same) 1890 Duluth City Directories: GABRIEL ORECKOVSKY [age 22), clothes cleaner, 27-1/2 W. Superior, res 31 W. 1st; HARRIS ORECKOVSKY, peddler, boards at 412-1/2 E. 4th; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, clerk, Mrs. Lessa Oreckovsky; res: 112 Garfield Ave; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, J. Oreckovsky; res: 111-1st Ave E.; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, clothes cleaner, 25 W. Superior St; res 214 E. 5th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOVSKY, jeweler, 112 Garfield Ave; res: same; 1891-1892 Duluth City Directory: ALLIE ORECKOVSKY, [age 17] clerk, Levine Bros, boards 111 E. 1st; GABRIEL ORECKOVSKY, secondhand goods, 27-1/2 W. Superior, res 31 W. 1st; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, clerk, Mrs. Lessa Oreckovsky; res: 112 Garfield Ave, West Duluth; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, Kovach & Orechovsky; res 111 rear 116 1st av E; JOHN ORECKOVSKY, laborer, boards 111 rear 116 1st av E. [with his fathe Israel; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKI, tailor, 25 W. Superior St; res 214 E. 5th; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, JR., [age 16] tailor, Joseph Oreckovski; boards 214 E. 5th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOVSKY, watchmaker, south side, So. 2nd, 2 streets E of 2nd Ave, West Duluth, res same "When these families came to Duluth they came with practically nothing. In many instances their tickets for passage were either given to them or financed by my father, Joseph. Many, many of the families upon their arrival here moved into our home with the children, baggage and all, and remained in our home until they became settled. Most of these immigrants did not come here out of choice, but rather because of necessity. The majority of them were in their middle thirties, limited in their education, perhaps with the exception of Hebrew and their religion. They had no money, unable to speak the language, and with a family to support. "With the assistance of the families already here they were fixed up with packs to peddle, or jobs with those somewhat established in a small store or tailor shop. Usually as soon as any of these immigrants could loan or accumulate $500, they opened a small clothing store, or new or second hand goods store... usually on the bowery or in working districts in the West End and West Duluth... I think it would be safe to say that 85 per cent of the members of our family that located in Duluth were in small store business." (Joseph's son, Abram "Abe" Oreck, in the Oreck Family News, October 1959) 1893 Duluth City Directory: ALEXANDER ORECKOVSKY, clerk, rooms 1330 W. Superior; ALLIE ORECKOVSKY, clerk, W.M. Abrahamson, res 920 W Michigan; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, Joseph Polinsky & Co, res 920 W. Michigan; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, clothing, 27-1/2 W Superior, res 118 1st av W; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, dyer, 27 W Superior, res 516 Lake av N; MONICK ORECKVOSKY, boards 920 W Michigan; JOSEPH ORECKOWSKY, peddler, res 326 E 9th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOWSKY, jeweler, 202 55th av W., res Raleigh 1 W of 61st av; ISRAEL ORECKOWSKY, manager, Mrs Lessa Oreckowsky, res s s Raleigh 1 W of 61st av. 1893-1894 Superior, Wisconsin Business Directory - Retail Clothing: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, 702-1/2 Tower av; ORECKOVSKY, POLINSKY & CO., 416 Tower av; SAMUEL ORECKOVSKY, 1619 N. 5th 1900 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 789 - Vol 54, ED 267, Sh 7, L 18) Residence: 516 Lake Ave. North, Duluth; JOSEPH ORACEKOESKY, June 1865, 34, m. 13y, Russia/Russia/Russia; immig 1885; here 15 y, tailor repair shop; ANNIE, Jan 1871, 29, m. 13y, 5/5, R/R/R, immig 1886; MARY, June 1888, 12, MN, at school; ABE, July 1890, 10, MN; EZRAEL, Sep 1892, 8, MN; EVA, May 1894, 6, MN; JAMES, May 1899, 1, MN; SOFFA NORTISMAKI, 26, Finland (servant) Joseph was rather successful as a tailor. He and Hannah came to own some property and flats in Duluth. 1901 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, propr, Duluth Steam Dye Works, 516 Lake av N, res. same On 8 November 1901, Joseph and Hannah became legal guardians of young Anna (15) and Meyer (12) Packer, children of Joseph's deceased sister, Elka, and Solomon Packer, who lived in Dawson City, Alaska at the time. Sadly, beautiful Annie died in Duluth of tuberculosis in 1904, just before her 18th birthday. On 11 Aug 1905, Joseph's brother, Israel Bright, petitioned the court for Joseph to produce a surety bond to show that Joseph had not misappropriated the money from Annie and Meyer Packer's modest estate. Israel was also concerned that all of Joseph's property had been given to Hannah "putting it beyond the reach of creditors." Joseph demonstrated his integrity to the court, but this surely caused a chasm in the family relationship, or deepened animosities that may have existed earlier. 1913/14 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 5-1/2 E 5th, res. same 1920 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 858 - Vol 74, ED 112, Sh 13, Line 37): 5 E. 7th, Duluth, MN; JOSEPH ORECKOESKY, 55 [1865], Russia/Jewish, R/J, R/J, immig 1885, Na 1891, proprietor, tailor shop; ANNA, 49 [1871], Russia/Jewish, R/J, R/J, immig 1887, Na 1891; ISRAEL, 27 [1893], MN, bookkeeper, railroad; JAMES, 20 [1899], MN, salesman, gum machines; IRVING, 9 [1911], MN 1922/23 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 28 N 4th av W; h. 5-1/2 E 5th The Oreckovskys, Oxmans, and other Russian orthodox Jews worshipped at Adas Israel temple on 3rd Street. 1925 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, 323 W. Superior, h 5-1/2 E. 5th "Grandpa was a hard working man. He would go downtown with a bag over his shoulder every day." (Jerome Oxman, 1994)
  His full name was "Yosef Mendl ben Shmuel ha Levi", written in Yiddish on his Duluth gravestone. CERTIFICATE OF DEATH (Microfilm 1933, #687): JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, died 27 Aug 1933, St. Mary's Hospital, Duluth; b Abt 1865, Russia; age 65; married, Anna; residence 516 Lake Ave North; resident 46 years [since 1887?]; tailor, last worked 1930; worked 40 years at his occupation; father, Samuel, b Russia; mother, Esther Bazelon, b Russia; informant, G.A. Oreck, 18 West 2nd; cause of death, Aleukemic myclosis OBITUARY, Duluth Herald, 28 Aug 1933: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, age 68..resident of the city for more than forty-six years..resided at 516 Lake Avenue North.." [Br�derbund WFT European Origins Vol. E1, Ed. 1, Tree #0447, Date of Import: Dec 30, 2003]
  In 1883, Joseph Oreckovsky, 19, and his brother, Israel (later Israel Bright), 23, arrived on the east coast of America. They were the first in our family to come from the Russian Empire, and among the first arrivals from eastern Europe in Duluth, Minnesota. Awaiting word from them were their kin in Revutskoe, Novoukrainka and other villages outside of Elisavetgrad, in the Russian Empire. THE YEARS BEFORE WE CAME TO AMERICA: In 1751, Empress Elizabeth of Russia built a fortress between Kiev and Odessa, on a bluff overlooking the river flowing south to the Black Sea. A trading post and village of Elisavetgrad sprang up. On a fertile, elevated plain, the area's excellent climate, productive soil, and good river transportation to Nikolaev and Odessa on the Black Sea became the basis for flourishing grain, livestock, hide, and sugar industries there. The native peasant farmers - Ukrainians, Cossacks, and Russians - were joined by immigrant Serbs, Valaches, Moldavians, Greeks, Bulgarians, Hungarians, Germans, Italians, and French, all eager to work the verdant soil. Many Jews arrived, commonly to engage in their traditional role of trading in agricultural products, and to add to the commercial and cultural well-being of the community. They came by trade routes from Poland, Germany, Austria, Turkey, and Greece. In 1850, Elisavetgrad had three synagogues and numerous Jewish schools and social institutions. That year, decrees were issued to restrict construction of Jewish homes to separate blocks, and to tax Jews on their traditional clothing. In 1855, Alexander II, became Czar of Russia. Known as the "czar liberator", he emancipated the serfs, and he made life much easier for Jews. This accelerated Jewish migration to Elisavetgrad (now Kirovograd) and nearby villages, where our relatives lived. Toward the end of the 1800s, Elisavetgrad's 28,000 Jews were one third of its population and largely responsible for its industry, education, and culture. The Jewish community supported a library, two vocational schools and ten prayer schools, or cheders. During this time, Jews built the first performing arts theatre in the Ukraine. It still stands. Revutskoye, Tishkovka, Novoukrainka, Bobrinets, Zlatopol, near Yelisavetgrad - this region is where the Oreckovskys and many of our relatives lived when, in 1881, liberal Czar Alexander II was asassinated. Reactionary Alexander III promptly cancelled his father's liberal acts and embarked upon programs of suppression. Elisavetgrad, one of the most visible centers of Jewish prosperity and culture, became the target of the first of many pogroms - government sponsored anti-Semitic riots by still-poor peasants and worried landowners, who had blamed the Jews for all the social problems. It was then that the two Oreckovsky sons were sent to explore for a new family home in North America. THE FIRST ORECKOVSKYS IN AMERICA (Excerpts from the Oreck Family News, 1993, by Ralph Oxman): Our first arrivals here were Joseph Oreckovsky and his brother, Israel (later Israel Bright), sons of Samuel and Esther Bazelon Oreckovsky. They arrived in Montreal, Canada [perhaps 1882, more likely 1883]. They worked their way toward Lake Superior along the construction of the new Canadian Pacific railway spur. Joe sold clothing; Israel, watches to the workers. Arriving at Fort William on Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, they set out for Duluth along frozen Lake Superior. Suffering from frostbite after 75 miles, they stayed over in Grand Marais, Minnesota, a portaging outpost for travellers crossing La Superior. In the Spring, they continued by boat on to Duluth. EARLY HISTORY OF THE FAMILY AS REPORTED BY ABE ORECK (Excerpted from the Oreck Family News, October 1959): This earlier story says that Joseph and Israel arrived first in New York, then went to Montreal. Joseph was single; Israel's wife and son were waiting in Russia. In Montreal they bought dry goods for peddling and, with backpacks full, they travelled the path of the new Canadian Pacific railway being built from Montreal to the area of Port Arthur, Fort William, and Grand Portage, on Thunder Bay, Canada. So in the Fall [of 1883], after walking from construction camp to camp, almost all the way from Montreal to Port Arthur, they reached Lake Superior. They had hoped to walk the lake's ice 200 miles on to Duluth, but Joe's feet and legs started to freeze. This version tells that Israel got Joe back to Port Arthur, where he remained in the hospital several months. One story is that the Native Americans assisted them off the lake and helped take care of them until Spring warmed up. (Miriam Oreck Long, 1993) In the Spring, [1884], they took the first boat on to Duluth, where they found six or eight Jewish families, including the Bernard Silbersteins and Ike Freimuths. Joe soon opened a small tailoring and pressing shop, and Israel started a watch repair and small jewelry store in West Duluth. Within a year they sent tickets for their parents, Schmeel and Esther Bazelon Oreckovsky, and the children - Gabe, Louie, Sara, and Elsa. Israel sent for his wife, Lena, and son, Sol. Hannah Oreckovsky, 16, came with them, and married Joseph, her first cousin, a few months later. Schmeel opened a tailor and pressing shop "in Superior". It was recently [1993] discovered that younger brother Gabriel's official citizenship documents record that he also arrived in Duluth at the same time as Joseph and Israel, June 1884. Gabe himself is not known to have said this, and it is was never part of our family's oral tradition. Either Gabe arrived by a different route, or, more likely, documents are incorrect and he arrived later, as told in early stories. APPLICATION FOR CITIZENSHIP (Microfilm 6, Code 11, Vol I, Pg 255/256, Duluth Library): On 30 Jan 1888, "JOSOPH ORECKOVSKY", "ISSRAIL ORECKOVSKY", and "GABEREAL ORECKOVSKY" applied together for U.S. citizenship at the 11th U.S. District Court, St. Louis County, Duluth, Minnesota. Joseph said he was born in "Russia in 1864" and "landed at the port of Duluth in June 1884." Israel's and Gabriel's documents confirmed they all arrived together in 1884, Israel having been born in 1861, Gabriel 1867. U.S. CITIZENSHIP (Microfilm 31, Code 75, Vol 6, Pg 111, Duluth Library): "JOSUPH ORECKOSKY" had declared his intention for citizenship 30 Jan 1888; signed 18 June 1897. His brother, Israel, became a citizen 6 Nov 1899, along with "Big Joe" Oreckovsky and Joseph "Eedel" Sosnovsky. 1882-1883 and 1884-1885 Duluth City Directory: (NO Oreckovsky found) "Not long after settling in Duluth, "Joseph acquired a group of frame flats on Lake Avenue and First Street. After his marriage to Hannah, one of these units became their home.." (Ralph Oxman, from the Oreck Family News, February 1993)
  1886-1887 Duluth Directory: ISAAC ORECKOVSKY, [Isaac and Zelda/Edith, and perhaps their son, Israel] rooms 20 First ave W.; ISAAC ORECKOVSKY, [Israel, age 25, son of Samuel and Esther] laborer, res 216 Lake ave S.; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, [age 21, son of Samuel and Esther] clothes cleaner, dyers and scourers, 216 Lake ave S., res same 1887-1888 Duluth Directory: ISAAC ORECOVSKY, lab, bds 216 Lake ave S; JOSEPH ORECOVSKY, tailor, H LeRoy, res. 216 Lake Av S; LESA ORECOVSKY, mens furnishing goods, 112 Third Rice's Point, res same; SAMUEL ORECOVSKY, tailor, John Ley & Co., res 216 Lake Ave S; MRS. SAMUEL ORECOVSKY, (John Ley & Co.) res. 216 Lake Ave S; (In 1887-88, no Shapiros, Sosnovskys, Schwartzbeins, or Boznus were found.) 1888-1889 Duluth Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 25 W. Superior Street (residence same); SAMUEL ORECKOVSKY [Joseph & Israel's father], tailor, 216 Lake Ave So; ISAAC ORECKOVSKY [Israel & Lena], jeweler, 112 3rd, Rice's Point (residence same) 1890 Duluth City Directories: GABRIEL ORECKOVSKY [age 22), clothes cleaner, 27-1/2 W. Superior, res 31 W. 1st; HARRIS ORECKOVSKY, peddler, boards at 412-1/2 E. 4th; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, clerk, Mrs. Lessa Oreckovsky; res: 112 Garfield Ave; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, J. Oreckovsky; res: 111-1st Ave E.; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, clothes cleaner, 25 W. Superior St; res 214 E. 5th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOVSKY, jeweler, 112 Garfield Ave; res: same; 1891-1892 Duluth City Directory: ALLIE ORECKOVSKY, [age 17] clerk, Levine Bros, boards 111 E. 1st; GABRIEL ORECKOVSKY, secondhand goods, 27-1/2 W. Superior, res 31 W. 1st; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, clerk, Mrs. Lessa Oreckovsky; res: 112 Garfield Ave, West Duluth; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, Kovach & Orechovsky; res 111 rear 116 1st av E; JOHN ORECKOVSKY, laborer, boards 111 rear 116 1st av E. [with his fathe Israel; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKI, tailor, 25 W. Superior St; res 214 E. 5th; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, JR., [age 16] tailor, Joseph Oreckovski; boards 214 E. 5th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOVSKY, watchmaker, south side, So. 2nd, 2 streets E of 2nd Ave, West Duluth, res same "When these families came to Duluth they came with practically nothing. In many instances their tickets for passage were either given to them or financed by my father, Joseph. Many, many of the families upon their arrival here moved into our home with the children, baggage and all, and remained in our home until they became settled. Most of these immigrants did not come here out of choice, but rather because of necessity. The majority of them were in their middle thirties, limited in their education, perhaps with the exception of Hebrew and their religion. They had no money, unable to speak the language, and with a family to support. "With the assistance of the families already here they were fixed up with packs to peddle, or jobs with those somewhat established in a small store or tailor shop. Usually as soon as any of these immigrants could loan or accumulate $500, they opened a small clothing store, or new or second hand goods store... usually on the bowery or in working districts in the West End and West Duluth... I think it would be safe to say that 85 per cent of the members of our family that located in Duluth were in small store business." (Joseph's son, Abram "Abe" Oreck, in the Oreck Family News, October 1959) 1893 Duluth City Directory: ALEXANDER ORECKOVSKY, clerk, rooms 1330 W. Superior; ALLIE ORECKOVSKY, clerk, W.M. Abrahamson, res 920 W Michigan; ISRAEL ORECKOVSKY, tailor, Joseph Polinsky & Co, res 920 W. Michigan; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, clothing, 27-1/2 W Superior, res 118 1st av W; JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, dyer, 27 W Superior, res 516 Lake av N; MONICK ORECKVOSKY, boards 920 W Michigan; JOSEPH ORECKOWSKY, peddler, res 326 E 9th; MRS. LESSA ORECKOWSKY, jeweler, 202 55th av W., res Raleigh 1 w of 61st av; ISRAEL ORECKOWSKY, manager, Mrs Lessa Oreckowsky, res s s Raleigh 1 w of 61st av. 1893-1894 Superior, Wisconsin Business Directory - Retail Clothing: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, 702-1/2 Tower av; ORECKOVSKY, POLINSKY & CO., 416 Tower av; SAMUEL ORECKOVSKY, 1619 N. 5th 1900 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 789 - Vol 54, ED 267, Sh 7, L 18) Residence: 516 Lake Ave. North, Duluth; JOSEPH ORACEKOESKY, June 1865, 34, m. 13y, Russia/Russia/Russia; immig 1885; here 15 y, tailor repair shop; ANNIE, Jan 1871, 29, m. 13y, 5/5, R/R/R, immig 1886; MARY, June 1888, 12, MN, at school; ABE, July 1890, 10, MN; EZRAEL, Sep 1892, 8, MN; EVA, May 1894, 6, MN; JAMES, May 1899, 1, MN; SOFFA NORTISMAKI, 26, Finland (servant) Joseph was rather successful as a tailor. He and Hannah came to own some property and flats in Duluth. 1901 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, propr, Duluth Steam Dye Works, 516 Lake av N, res. same On 8 November 1901, Joseph and Hannah became legal guardians of young Anna (15) and Meyer (12) Packer, children of Joseph's deceased sister, Elka, and Solomon Packer, who lived in Dawson City, Alaska at the time. Sadly, beautiful Annie died in Duluth of tuberculosis in 1904, just before her 18th birthday. On 11 Aug 1905, Joseph's brother, Israel Bright, petitioned the court for Joseph to produce a surety bond to show that Joseph had not misappropriated the money from Annie and Meyer Packer's modest estate. Israel was also concerned that all of Joseph's property had been given to Hannah "putting it beyond the reach of creditors." Joseph demonstrated his integrity to the court, but this surely caused a chasm in the family relationship, or deepened animosities that may have existed earlier. 1913/14 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 5-1/2 E 5th, res. same 1920 U.S. CENSUS (Roll 858 - Vol 74, ED 112, Sh 13, Line 37): 5 E. 7th, Duluth, MN; JOSEPH ORECKOESKY, 55 [1865], Russia/Jewish, R/J, R/J, immig 1885, Na 1891, proprietor, tailor shop; ANNA, 49 [1871], Russia/Jewish, R/J, R/J, immig 1887, Na 1891; ISRAEL, 27 [1893], MN, bookkeeper, railroad; JAMES, 20 [1899], MN, salesman, gum machines; IRVING, 9 [1911], MN 1922/23 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, tailor, 28 N 4th av W; h. 5-1/2 E 5th The Oreckovskys, Oxmans, and other Russian orthodox Jews worshipped at Adas Israel temple on 3rd Street. 1925 Duluth City Directory: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, 323 W. Superior, h 5-1/2 E. 5th "Grandpa was a hard working man. He would go downtown with a bag over his shoulder every day." (Jerome Oxman, 1994)
  His full name was "Yosef Mendl ben Shmuel ha Levi", written in Yiddish on his Duluth gravestone. CERTIFICATE OF DEATH (Microfilm 1933, #687): JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, died 27 Aug 1933, St. Mary's Hospital, Duluth; b abt 1865, Russia; age 65; married, Anna; residence 516 Lake Ave North; resident 46 years [since 1887?]; tailor, last worked 1930; worked 40 years at his occupation; father, Samuel, b Russia; mother, Esther Bazelon, b Russia; informant, G.A. Oreck, 18 West 2nd; cause of death, Aleukemic myclosis OBITUARY, Duluth Herald, 28 Aug 1933: JOSEPH ORECKOVSKY, age 68..resident of the city for more than forty-six years..resided at 516 Lake Avenue North.."


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