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  1. Simon Thompson: Birth: ABT 1618 in England. Death: 16 MAY 1658 in Woburn, Middlesex, Mass


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a. Note:   worldconnect: Raven Genealogy and Family History Entries: 42424 Updated: 2005-01-23 21:55:23 UTC (Sun) Contact: Alice
"Loyalists of Mass, p 261: JAMES THOMPSON, one of the original settlers of Woburn, was prominent among those who fixed their residence in that part of the town now known as North Woburn. Little is known of his English antecedents except that he was born in 1593, his wife's name was Elizabeth and by her he had three sons and one daughter all probably born in England. As early as 1630 when he was thirty-seven he joined the company of about fifteen hundred persons who under lead of Governor Winthrop landed on New England shores during the eventful year. He was one of the first settlers of Charlestown and belonged to sturdy yeomanry of the country. He was among the few adventurers who early pushed their way into an unknown region and fixed their home in the wilderness, with Henry Baldwin and a few others, in that part of Charlestown Village now known as North Woburn. James Thompson was twice married. Elizabeth died November 13, 1643, and he married February 15, 1644, Susannah Blodgett, widow of Thomas Blodgett of Cambridge. The descendants of this early settler are now very numerous in the country. 3 �Death: BET 28 FEB 1682 AND 03 OCT 1682 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts 4 5 �Residence: DEC 1640 Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts �Note: and was one of thirty-two men who signed the Town Orders, or by-laws 4 6 �Religion: admitted to the First Church 31 OCT 1633 Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts 7 4 8 �Event: Freeman 14 MAY 1634 Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts 9 10 �Will: 28 FEB 1681/82 Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts �Note: In his will, dated the "last day of February" 1681[/2] and proved 3 October 1682, James Thompson Sr. of Woburn bequeathed to "my loving son Jonathan Thompson the only child now of my own body all my house & outhousing & all my lands whatsoever" and all moveables, except for following legacies; to "Sarah Redknap & Hannah Horn my grandchildren forty shillings apiece in silver (viz:) I give to Hannah Horn forty shillings of that money of mine now in her own hands, the other twenty shillings in silver in her hands my will is that she pay it to her sister Sarah Redknap & my will is that John Sheldin Sr. shall pay her the other twenty shillings in silver out of that money he hath of mine in his hands"; to "John Cuttler & Susannah Logee my grandchildren & to my son Jonathan's six children three pounds apiece ... and my will is that James Thompson my grandchild & Jno. Sheldin aforesaid shall pay to Jno. Cuttlar & Susanna Logee their three pounds apiece" and the rest to come out of the estate; son Jonathan to be sole executor and "my trusted & wellbeloved friends Samuel Blogget Sr. & John Mousall to be overseers ... & as a pledge of my love I give to said Bloggett Mr. Rogers his book & Mousall a pair of new gloves" [MPR 6:8-10]. -- Great Migration Begins 4 11 �Immigration: 1633 Massachusetts �Note: in Winthrop's Fleet 6 5 �Event: Note �Note: New Eng Fams Gen & Mem, 3rd Ser, Vol III, pp 1350-1351: THOMPSON James Thompson, the immigrant ancestor, was born in England in 1593, and died in Woburn, Massachusetts, in 1682. He was one of the original settlers of Woburn, and was a member of the first board of selectmen, holding also other offices in the town. He had been one of the first settlers of Charlestown, and belonged to the class of yeomanry. He, with his wife Elizabeth, was admitted to the First Church in Charlestown, August 31, 1633, and he became a freeman in December of the same year. In December, 1640, he was one of thirty-two men who signed the Town Orders, or by-laws, for Woburn, with Henry Baldwin and one or two others. He pushed his way into the wilderness and established his home in the part of Woburn now known as North Woburn, and anciently known as New Bridge. His descendants are now very widely scattered in nearly every state and territory in the Union and in several foreign countries. They are numerous in Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin and Berkshire counties, in Massachusetts; more so in Suffolk; and the most of them in Middlesex; Woburn, North Village, has always been considered the true home of the Thompsons. He married (first) Elizabeth (???), who died November 13, 1643. He married (second) February 15, 1644, Susannah Blodgett, widow of Thomas Blodgett, of Cambridge, and she died February 10, 1661. James Thompson owned considerable property in Woburn and Charlestown. His will was dated February 28, 1681. Children, probably not in order of birth: James, died January 24, 1646-47; Simon, mentioned below; Olive, married John Cutler; Jonathan, married Susannah Blodgett. 4 �Residence: 1633 Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts 4 �Event: Note �Note: Virkus, Abridged Compendium, p 3534: THOMPSON, James (1593-1682), from Eng. in Winthrop's fleet, to Charlestown, Mass., 1630; freeman, 1634; original settler at Woburn, 1640; m in Eng., Elizabeth -----(d 1643); m 2d, 1644, Susanna -----, widow of Thomas Blodget, of Cambridge 6 �Event: Note �Note: Hamlin Family, p 1245: JAMES THOMPSON,1 b. England, 1593; wife Elizabeth, three sons and a dau. all b. England. He came to Mass., in the company of Gov. Winthrop, landed at Salem, June, 1630. one of the first settlers of Charlestown, Mass.; yeoman; freeman, Dec., 1633; one of the first settlers of Woburn, Mass 12 �Event: Note �Note: Farmer, Gen Reg 1st Settlers, p 285: JAMES, Woburn, was born a. 1593, admitted freeman 1634, when he probably resided in Charlestown. Eliza, his wife, d. Nov. 1639, and he m. Susanna Blodget in Feb. 1644. His son James was born 24 Jan. 1646. 13 �Event: Note �Note: Savage 4, p 176: JAMES, Charlestown, with w. Eliz. adm. of the ch. in the autumn of 1633, freem. 14 May 1634, was, says Frothingham, 82, one of the first selectmen of Woburn. His w. by wh. he had Jonathan, perhaps b. on this side of the ocean, as sure. was Simon, on the other side, d. 8 Nov. 1643; and he m. 15 Feb. foll. Susanna, wid. of Thomas Blodget of Cambridge, had James, b. 24 Jan. 1646, or 7, d. soon; James, again, a. 1649; and perhaps others. His w. d. 10 Feb. 1661; and he d. 1682. 7 �Event: Note �Note: Great Migration Begins: JAMES THOMSON ORIGIN: Fishtoft, Lincolnshire MIGRATION: 1633 FIRST RESIDENCE: Charlestown REMOVES: Woburn 1640 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: On 31 [October?] 1633 "James Tomson and Elizabeth his wife" were admitted to Charlestown church [ChChR 8]. FREEMAN: 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:369]. ESTATE: Surrendered five acres Mystic Side, 1635 [ChTR 14]. Had one acre of planting ground, January 1635/6 [ChTR 15]. Had one share of hay ground in 1635, which was increased to two [ChTR 19, 20]. Had five acres Mystic Side, 1637 [ChTR 27]. Had three and a quarter cow commons, 1637 [ChTR 33]. Received Mystic Side allotments of five, thirty and five acres, 23 April 1638 [ChTR 36]. On 27 August 1638 "James Tomson is granted a houseplot next to Jno: Brimsmead's" [ChTR 40]. On 30 December 1638 had three and a quarter cow commons in the stinted common [ChTR 42]. In the 1638 Charlestown Book of Possessions "James Tomson" held nine parcels: two acres in High Field with "a dwelling house and other appurtenances thereunto"; one acre of arable in High Field; two acres meadow in High Field Marsh; two acres in Line Field; three and a quarter milch cow commons (later annotation that one quarter milch cow common was sold to John Green and one full common to John March); two acres meadow in Mystic Field; five acres woodland in Mystic Field; five acres woodland in Mystic Field; and forty acres of land in Water Field [ChBOP 26]. The inventory of the estate of "James Thompson Sr. late of Woburne deceased" was taken 22 September 1682 and totalled �103 17s. (the original arithmetic given incorrectly as �133 17s.), including �59 in real estate: "house & homestall," �30; "outlands & meadow," �23; and "woodlands," �6 [MPR 6:10]. BIRTH: Baptized Frieston, Lincolnshire, 4 March 1592[/3?], son of John and Joan [Baxter?] Thomason [TAG 74:101-4]. DEATH: Between 28 February 1681/2 (date of will) and 22 September 1682 (date of inventory). MARRIAGE: (1) By 1619 Anne _____; she was buried at Frieston, Lincolnshire, 13 December 1625 [TAG 74:102]. (2) By 1628 Elizabeth _____; she died at Woburn 8 November 1643. (3) Woburn 15 February 1643/4 Susanna (_____) Blodgett, widow of Thomas Blodgett [Dawes-Gates 1:91-92]; she died at Woburn 10 February 1660/1. CHILDREN: With first wife i SIMON, bp. Frieston, Lincolnshire, 3 July 1919 [TAG 74:103]; m. Woburn 19 December 1643 Mary Converse, daughter of EDWARD CONVERSE. ii MARY, bp. Frieston, Lincolnshire, 16 April 1621 and buried there 17 April 1621 [TAG 74:103]. iii ALICE, bp. Frieston, Lincolnshire, 16 April 1622; no further record. iv FRANCIS, bp. Frieston, Lincolnshire, 9 April 1624; no further record. With second wife v JONATHAN, bp. Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, 14 December 1628 [TAG 74:103]; m. Woburn 28 November 1655 Susanna Blodgett (his stepsister). vi JAMES, bp. Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, 12 June 1631 [TAG 74:103]; d. Woburn 24 January 1646/7. vii OLIVE, b. say 1633; m. Woburn 3 September 1650 John Cutler. COMMENTS: "James Tomson" was admitted as an inhabitant of Charlestown in December 1633 [ChTR 9]. He was in the lists of inhabitants of Charlestown of 9 January 1633/4 and 1635/6 [ChTR 10, 15]. Pope cites the church admission as occurring in August 1633, but the month is missing; by context the month seems more likely to be October, or perhaps a month or two later. BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1999 Leslie Mahler published his discovery of the English origin of James Thomson [TAG 74:101-4]. 5
Sources: 1.Title: Genealogical Record of Several Famlies Bearing the Name of Cutler in the United States Abbrev: Genealogical Record ... Cutler Author: Morse, Rev. Abner Publication: Samuel G. Drake, Boston, 1867 Page: p 16 2.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 Page: citing TAG 74:101-4 3.Title: Biographies of the Loyalists of Massachusetts, and the other side of the American revolution Abbrev: Loyalists of Massachusetts Author: Stark, James Publication: W.B. Clarke Co., Boston, 1910 Page: p 261 4.Title: New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume III Abbrev: New England Families, 3rd Series, Vol. III Author: Cutter, William Richard Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1915 -- reprint 1996 Page: pp 1350-1351 5.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 6.Title: The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy: First Families of America, Volume I Abbrev: Abridged Compendium Author: Editor: Virkus, Frederick A. Publication: F.A. Virkus & Company, Chicago, 1925 Repository: Name: GenealogyLibrary.com Page: p 3534 7.Title: Genealogical Dictionary of First Settlers of New England, Volume: Vol. 4 Abbrev: Genealogical Dictionary, vol. 4 Author: Savage, James Publication: Genealogical Publishing Company, Boston, 1860-1862 Page: p 176 8.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 Page: citing Charlestown Church Recs 8 9.Title: New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume III Abbrev: New England Families, 3rd Series, Vol. III Author: Cutter, William Richard Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1915 -- reprint 1996 Page: pp 1350-1351 (Dec 1633) 10.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 Page: citing MBCR 1:369 11.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 Page: citing MPR 6:10 12.Title: A GENEALOGY OF JAMES HAMLIN OF BARNSTABLE MASSACHUSETTS, ELDEST SON OF JAMES HAMLIN, THE IMMIGRANT, WHO CAME FROM LONDON, ENGLAND, AND SETTLED IN BARNSTABLE, 1639, 1639--1902 Abbrev: Hamlin Family Author: Hon. H. Franklin Andrews Publication: published by the author, Exira, Iowa, 1902 Repository: Name: GenealogyLibrary.com Page: p 1245 13.Title: Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New England Abbrev: Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New England Author: Farmer, John Page: p 285 14.Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins, Volumes I-III Author: Anderson, Robert Charles Publication: Great Migration Study Project, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 2000 Page: citing Dawes-Gates 1:91-92 "
also
"A Chronological History of Woburn, Massachusetts
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Introduction1700s1800s1900s 1710s1810s1910s 1620s1720s 1820s1920s 1630s1730s1830s1930s 1640s1740s1840s1940s 1650s1750s1850s1950s 1660s1760s1860s1960s 1670s1770s1870s1970s 1680s1780s1880s1980s 1690s1790s1890s1990s Conclusion
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Introduction Charlestown, settled in 1629, only nine years after the Pilgrims founded Plymouth Colony, is actually the starting point of Woburn�s history. In the early 1630s, looking to expand Charlestown, its citizens petitioned the newly elected representatives of the Great and General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony for more land. A wide extent of territory on the �main land� eight miles northward was granted to Charlestown (this area includes present day Woburn, Winchester, Burlington and parts of Stoneham and Wilmington).
In February of 1640 a group set forth from Charlestown to find a suitable location for their projected town. After much deliberation, present day Woburn Center was chosen as the site for the new Village.
On November 5, 1640 a committee of seven was appointed by Charlestown to determine the boundary lines of the new settlement. The seven men who received this grant to undertake the settlement of Charlestown Village, as it was to be called, were Captain Edward Johnson, Thomas Richardson, Samuel Richardson, Ezekiel Richardson, Thomas Graves, Edward Converse and John Mousall. These men were required to build houses for habitation within two years. They also were entrusted with the power to grant lands to other persons willing to build and live within the newly formed Village. The grant further stated that it was the duty of these men to select newcomers who would work as a unit to improve the land, lay out the streets and maintain a civil and religious society.
Edward Converse is said to have built the first house and mill in 1640. It was located in the southern part of town (now Winchester Center). John Mousall�s house was the first dwelling built in present day Woburn. It was located on what is now Montvale Avenue. Captain Edward Johnson was chosen as the first Town Clerk on December 18, 1640. Not yet even a year old, the spirit of independence was strong in the new Charlestown Village. Already plans were underway to create a distinct Town, instead of a Village more or less dependent upon Charlestown.
Religion played an important role in Puritan Massachusetts. Every incorporated Town or Parish was required to have a church and pastor. On December 5, 1641 the Rev. Thomas Carter, the first pastor, gave his first sermon. The first church was built around this time on the southerly side of the Common.
The new Village was growing, a church and pastor were a part of the community; the way was now prepared for granting the privileges of a Town to this newly established community. The General Court met in session in the fall of 1642 and the Town of Woburn was incorporated on October 7, 1642. The act of incorporation reads: "Charlestowne Village is called Wooborne'.
1620s The vicinity of present day Woburn was first visited by white men in 1621. 1630s Charlestown petitioned the Great and General Court of Massachusetts for more land. This decade was a time of exploration and planning for the future settlement. 1640s This was a busy decade for the new Village. In addition to the events described in the narrative, other memorable occurrences included: Bridges were built over the Aberjona River (Feb. 10, 1641) and the Horn Pond River (Aug. 26, 1641). The first birth in the Village was Increase Winn, son of Edward, born December 5, 1641. The first church of Charlestown Village was built in late 1641, early 1642 - located on the southerly side of the Common. Charlestown Village now had about thirty families living within its boundaries; almost 150 people. The General Court met in session and the Town of Woburn was incorporated on October 7, 1642. The act of incorporation reads: "Charlestown Village is called Wooburne". The first general town meeting was held November 9, 1643; absence from a public meeting without an excuse meant a fine of 18 pence. Lynn Village (Reading) separated from Woburn, May 29,1644. The first organizational Town Meeting was held and the first town officers were chosen on April 13, 1644. Selectmen were: Edward Johnson, Edward Converse, John Mousall, William Learned, Ezekiel Richardson, Samuel Richardson and James Thompson. William Learned was also selected as Constable. Some of the first streets were laid out in November of 1644, including Upstreet (Main St. �Busy Bend� area); Sawpit Lane (take Lexington St. to Revere Road - off to the left parts still exist as it was in the 1600s); and Military Lane (Common St. in front of City Hall). More streets were laid out by 1646, including the road to Reading and the Highway to Mistick Bridge (Medford). Ezekiel Richardson, one of the original founders died on October 21, 1647. 1650s By 1652 Woburn had grown to sixty families, doubling its population in ten years. The first silver money coined by the State was seen in town by the early 1650s. New Bridge Village (North Woburn) was named for the new bridge over the river in 1656. Three of the original founders died during this decade: Thomas Richardson died on August 28, 1651. Thomas Graves died in 1653. Samuel Richardson died on March 23, 1657. 1660s Baldwin Mansion in North Woburn was built by Henry Baldwin in 1661. A great earthquake was recorded during the year 1663. In 1668 Gershom Flagg's tannery was located behind the present day Unitarian and Baptist Churches. Samuel Converse was killed by the water wheel at the Mill in South Woburn on February 20, 1669. Two of the original founders died in the 1660s: John Mousall died on March 27, 1665. Edward Converse died on August 10, 1663. 1670s Susanna Brooks is listed in town records of 1670 as the first practitioner of medicine in Woburn. In 1671 the Court ordered Selectmen to go round and see if the children were 'catechised' according to law (weekly religious lessons were required). The Second Meeting House was built on the hill East of the Common in 1672. Only three pews were allowed to be built Edward Johnson, Town Clerk and the last survivor of the original founders, died in 1672. His son William Johnson was chosen to replace him as Town Clerk. The first public schoolmaster, in 1674, was Jonathan Thompson and the first public schoolmistress was Mrs. Allen Converse. In 1674 two Selectmen were fined for non-attendance at meetings, six pence each. By law no person could �harbor a stranger� more than three days without the consent of the Selectmen. In 1675, the first known tavern was kept by Samuel Walker. Samuel Walker was the first person licensed to sell intoxicating liquor. Samuel Walker was fined 20 shillings for improper sale of liquor. Hopestill Foster was fined in 1677 for oppression in charging inordinate wages. Samuel Richardson's wife and children were killed by Indians April 10, 1676. In 1678 Small pox was prevalent. 1680s Newton's great comet as it was called, appeared in 1680. The Rev. Thomas Carter died in 1684. The town paid for fourteen gallons of wine for his funeral. By 1685 there were one hundred families living in Woburn. Women were reproved by the authorities for extravagance in dress in 1686. In 1688 there was a spring drought and measles were prevalent that year. 1690s The Town, established fifty years ago, had a population of 550 in 1692. The first Town Treasurer was elected in 1695. 1700s The beginning of the century witnessed Woburn�s continued growth. Since established as a town, records indicated there had been 1313 births and 340 deaths. In 1708 the total real estate value in town was 22 pounds, 8 shillings, 3 pence. Woburn was fourth in the county for population and wealth. 1710s In 1713 the first school house was built. Count Rumford's birth place in North Woburn was built around 1714. The winter of 1717 brought The Great Snow - 20 to 25 feet Dr. Peters, the first resident physician, arrived in 1719. 1720s There were 305 tax payers in Woburn by 1725. On October 29, 1729 a great earthquake occurred. 1730s Wilmington separated from Woburn in 1730. Second Parish, (Woburn Precinct, Burlington) was incorporated September 27, 1730. 1740s By the town's one hundredth year, the population had increased to about 1400. Col. Loammi Baldwin was born January 10, 1745. 1750s Prince Walker was sold as a slave on July 10, 1751. Count Rumford (Benjamin Thompson) was born in North Woburn on March 26, 1753. Some of his inventions included the drip coffee pot and the kitchen stove. President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said that the three greatest minds America ever produced were Jefferson, Franklin and Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford). In 1756 David Cummings began tanning on the estate formerly used by the Hon. John Cummings. 1760s Bears were seen on the old Converse Place located on Salem Street in 1760. A great gale was reported in 1761. The Black Horse Tavern opened for business in 1763 in South Woburn. By 1765 the population had increased to 1575 and there were now 228 dwelling houses located in Woburn. 1770s Records of the Revolutionary War dominate the news from this decade. In 1775: Asahel Porter and Daniel Thompson were killed at the Battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775. Hancock, Adams and Dorothy Quincy were concealed at Madame Jones� house at Woburn Precinct that same day. In 1776 Washington was entertained at Black Horse Tavern in South Woburn. Some weather conditions during these ten years were also notable: 1770 brought what was called a �remarkable storm�. The next year lists great spring floods. In 1773 twenty people froze to death. The decade drew to a close with a hurricane that tore off the roof of the Woburn Precinct Church on August 15, 1777. 1780s May 19, 1780 was recorded as the �Dark Day�. Conditions were probably caused by numerous forest fires in upstate New York and in Canada. .............."



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