Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Benjamin Temple: Birth: 27 JUL 1690 in Concord, Mass. Death: 6 MAR 1753


Notes
a. Note:   NI11900
Note:   following from The Syiek Family Tree Entries: 6982 Updated: 2004-07-11 09:49:02 UTC (Sun) Contact: J Syiek
Abraham Temple served in the military in 1675 in Kingston, Washington, RI. He was impressed at Concord between 25 Nov and 3 Dec 1675. He is mentioned in a warrant of impressment as an able bodied soldier, 10 Mar 1675. He served as a soldier in the King Philip's War. He was one of a thousand men who mustered on Dedham Plain, 9 Dec 1675, and marched for Narragansett Fort, the stronghold of King Philip, situated on an island in a swamp in what is now South Kingston, RI. He received a wound in the attack on the fort, in which 4 of Captain Nathaniel Davenport's company were killed, and 11 wounded. 24 June 1675, he received 2 pounds and two shillings for earlier services in the same war. In 1735, he, among others, received a grant of land (known as a Narragansett grant) as a recognition of services rendered the Commonwealth in King Philip's War. 3 Jan 1689, Abraham, Richard and Isaac are mentioned in the town records as "freeholders but not freeman, " not being members of the Church. They were, however, made freeman by the General Court in Boston, 21 March 1690. He died on 4 Jan 1738/39 in Concord, Middlesex, MA. Buried in Old Burying Ground, Concord, MA on the hillside overlooking Concord Square. His tombstone was still standing in Sept 1995, and the inscription was as distinct as when first cut. Real estate conveyances, recorded at East Cambridge, MA, indicate he was a man of considerable means. His estate was not administered on until 18 years after he died, and then amounted only to $375. The following inventory of Abraham's estate was returned 30 Dec 1756: Money due to the estate, a dark mare, a saddle and bridle, one fat ox, one yoke of oxen, six steers and four cows, two heifers and three fat swine, four small swine and three house ladders, five old axes, two plows, two broad hoes, fodder in both barns, eight seven bushels of Indian corn and rye, fifteen bushels of oats and ten bushel of beans, a cart and wheels, an ox yoke and irons, one chain, a retie line, three lengths and tacklings, three old saws, fourteen harrow teeth, a file, square and broad, old iron, a half bushel, adz, hammer and two sickles, fine lock, plain iron beetle, rings and wedges, six barrels of cider and old casks, salted beef, fresh beef and cow hide, a drag and iron pins, a grindstone, and iron crow, a tunnel, two black sheep skins, cloth for a coat and hat; an old blue coat, a pair of leather "bricks" (breeches) and two shirts, a pair of shoes, an ox yoke for one ox, one pair of stockings and one book, a cloth colored coat and jacket, one hay fork and a shovel, about three acres of upland and meadow.
further from
Genealogy of Pierce and allied families Entries: 4567 Updated: Wed Feb 26 15:21:08 2003 Contact: Peter C. Pierce
RESIDENCE: He and his family lived in Concord, Middlesex, MA.
BURIAL: He is buried in the old "Hill burying ground". His gravestone was standing and readable in August 1897.
BIOGRAPHY: "He is mentioned in a warrant of pressment as an able bodied soldier, March 10, 1675. He served as a soldier in King Phillip's war. He was one of a thousand men who mustered on Dedham plain, Dec 9, 1675, and marched for Narragansett Fort, the stronghold of King Phillip, situated on an insland in a swamp in what is now South Kingston, R.I. Abraham was wounded in the attack upon this fort. June 24, 1675, he received two pounds and two shillings for earlierservices in the same war. In 1735 he, among others, received a grant of land (known as a Narragansett grant) as a recognition of services rendered the Commonwealth in King Phillip's war." From "Some Temple Pedigrees..."
BIOGRAPHY: January 3, 1689, Abraham, Richard, and Isaac are mentioned in the town records as "freeholders but non-freemen", not being members of the Church. They were however made freemen by the General Court in Boston, March 21, 1690.
BIOGRAPHY: He bought and sold a lot of land per records at East Cambridge, MA.
DEATH: His estate was not administered until the following inventory dated 30 Dec 1756, 18 years after his death. "Money due to the estate, a dark mare, a saddle and bridle, one fat ox, one yoke of oxen, six steers and four cows, two heifers and three fat swine, four small swine and three house ladders, five old axes, two plows, two broad hoes, fodder in both barns, eighty seven bushels of Indian corn and rye, fifteen bushels of oats and one bushell of beans, a cart and wheels, anox yoke and irons, one chain, a rie line, three lengths and tacklings, three oldsaws, fourteen harrow teeth, a file, square and frad, old iron, a half bushel, adz, hammer and two sickles, fine lock, plain iron beetle, rings and wedges, six barrels of cider and old casks, salted beef, fresh beef and cow hide, a dragand iron pins, a grindstone and iron crow, a tunnel, two black sheep skins, cloth for a coat and jacket cut out, a black jacket, an old great coat and hat; an old blue coat, a pair of leather "bricks" (breeches) and two shirts, a pair of shoes, an ox yoke for one ox, one pair stockings and one book, a cloth colored coat and jacket, one hay fork and a shovel, about threeacres of upland and meadow." 3


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.