Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Edmee* (Aimee) Lejeune: Birth: ABT 1622.

  2. Pierre Lejeune: Birth: ABT 1630.

  3. Catherine Lejeune: Birth: ABT 1633 in desc to V. Carter. Death: ABT 1672


Notes
a. Note:   following from WorldConnect
  MY NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE BEGININGS IN ARCADIA Entries: 173 Updated: Fri Oct 26 16:45:00 2001 Contact: Sue Ann Allen
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  IN HONOR OF MY FATHER, ALFRED JOSEPH DARCE 1903 TO 1961
  ID: I171 Name: PIERRE LEJEUNE 1 2 3 4 Sex: M Birth: 1595 1 2 Birth: 1595 in FRANCE 3 4 Note: [micmetis.FTW]
  RECORD OF PROOF:
  Let it be known that the record of Pierre Lejeune has been found in Leopold Lanctot's tome 2 of tome 1 & 2 which is volume I & 2, published in 1994 in French and in English. Lanctot's record of this was found in the Oblats Marie Immaculee, which is an order of Catholic Priest's. That which states that, the Lejeune's noted are Metis Indian's. Edmee, Pierre and Catherine Lejeune were born in the Cap de Sable, Arcadia area. Thus all descendants are of Metis Indian descent.
  Metis means French Indian and was one of the original families of this kind. All descendants, are Metis Indians and are of mixed blood Indian descent. Pierre Lejeune, was in Acadia around the time of the birth of these children, even though he is not named as the father of these children and since he was the only Lejeune there at the time beside a Jesuit father by the name of Lejeune, so by all indications on of these Lejeune's is their father and more that likely it was Pierre and not the Jesuit father, lets hope. There is another document by Louis Hebert, considered as the first settler there in Acadia, that I have seen mentioned by not shown, that was dated I believe around 1612 that Pierre Lejeune was mentioned in this document as being in Acadia.
  This record was sent to me by Luc Lacroix an Indian himself out of Quebec, Canada on Sept. 20, 2000 by fax to me. We had been corresponding by email in Aug. 2000. Luc Lacroix volunteers at the Canadian Government assiting idividuals and families, with their proof and documents. He researches at the National Archives in Montreal to back up the proof needed for helping those individuals with aid, education housing, joining various Indian Organization's. The Canadian Government excepts the Lanctot's pages as positive proof of Indian Ancestry. Luc, himself an Indian, told me that other's have been turned down with more information than the Lanctot pages.
  Pierre Lejeune along with Jean Lambert and a Guidry are mentioned in these pages. Some of these men returned to France with there familes and came back to Acadia to resume their life. Most of these families live with the Indian's instead of Port Royal and later when their children married French, the left to live with other French. Even though the US government does not recognize (no benifits or aid) the Metis Indian but does recognized the Micmac tribe in New England, a descendant can learn about his or her's Micmac/Metis Heritage through the Metis Confederarcy here in the US. It is my pleasure to bring you this information, about your Native American Ancestry mixed with our French Ancestry. What a friendship, what a begining in the America's. For without the help and friendship of the Micmac Indian's in Acadia some of our ancester's would have not survied.
  My heart felt thanks forever to the Micmac Indian's of Acadia, now Nova Scotia. And to my father Alfred Joseph Darce who on the night before he died in May of 1961, told me, that I was Indian. I love you, daddy and thank you for sending me on this ancestry journey. Sue Anna Darce Allen
  From the record's of the Lejeune children recorded without beneifit of Pierre himself not being in Bona Arsenault's book's which are in 6 volumes called Historie Et Genealogie Des Acadians prepared by the Rev. Donald J. Hebert, will be recorded as follow's. Bona Arsenault= BA with location of town and Page = pg with the number of the page in his volumes. Pierre Lejeune is not mentioned in any of the census taken in Acadia, but then no census was taken from any of the villiages that the French and Indian families. So no fault is thrown in any direction, because the early records were not taken. Even though many have denied that this record was proof, none the less it is. Much to my sorrow that many do not believe. It is and it has been my opinion all my life before I found out that I descend from a mix blood Indian linage the we as American and citizens of the United States owe a debt of gratitude to the Native Americans. Had it not been with the help of the Indians, our other forfathers would not have survived in this country. Our forfathers learned many things from them.
  Marriage 1 INDIAN WOMAN TRIBE MICMAC b: ABT. 1600 in MICMAC VILLIAGE, ACADIA Married: BEF. 1624 in MICMAC VILLIAGE, ACADIA 3 4 Married: BEF. 1624 in MICMAC VILLIAGE, NOVA SCOTIA 1 2 Children EDMEE LEJEUNE ,METIS INDIAN b: 1624 in PROBABLY PORT ROYALOR CAP DE SABLE, ACADIE PIERRE LEJEUNE ,METIS INDIAN b: 1630 in PROBABLY CAP DE SABLE, ACADIA CATHERINE LEJEUNE ,METIS INDIAN b: 1633 in PROBABLY, CAP DE SABLE, ACADIE Sources: 1. Title: sue.FTW Repository: Call Number: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 26 Aug 2000
  2.Title: originalDARCEfilesue.FTW Repository: Call Number: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: Oct 16, 2001
  3.Title: FAMILIES ACADIENNE TOME II Author: LEOPOLD LANCTOT Publication: PUBLISHED IN 1911 IN FRENCH Note: LUC VOLUNTERS IN THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT, AN INDIAN HIMSELF HELPING TO DOCUMENT PROOF OF INDIAN ANCESTRY, THAT IS APPOVED BY THE CANDADIAN GOVERNMENT BEFORE AID CAN BE GIVEN. Note: GOVERNMENT EMAIL ADDRESS Repository: Note: QUEBEC, LUC LACROIX, ASSOCIATE VOLUNTER, CANADIAN GOVERNMENT Call Number: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 26 Aug 2000
  4.Title: micmetis.FTW Repository: Call Number: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: Nov 11, 2000
  and another version - WHO IS CORRECT??
  Louisiana Roots & Beyond Entries: 36861 Updated: Tue Nov 19 18:23:30 2002 Contact: Jerry Bordelon
  ID: I03355 Name: Pierre LEJEUNE 1 Sex: M Birth: 1595 in Martaize, Poitou, Vienne, France Death: in Port Royal, Acadia, Canada ARVL: 1611 Port Royal, Acadia with Pointrincourt & Biencourt Reference Number: T578-F8 Note: Lejeunes immigrated via interesting path By Damon Veach Genealogy columnist/The Times-Picayune April 12, 1998 The first Lejeune to arrive in Acadia from France was Pierre LeJeune, along with his wife, whose name is not known, and their three children, Edmee or Aimee, Pierre II and Catherine. This LeJeune family was from the Poitou region of France.
  By the census of 1671, Edmee was married to Francois Gautrot (Gautreaux), and Catherine was married to Francois Scavois (Savoie). Pierre II is not mentioned in the census of 1671. However, in the census of 1686, two LeJeune men are listed, Pierre III (age 28) and Martin Lejeune dit Briard (age 25). They are listed as brothers, and because of their young ages, the Pierre III of this census could not be the same Pierre II listed as having arrived in Acadia in the 1630s. (Were these two LeJeune men the sons of the young Pierre Lejeune II who arrived with his sisters, Edmee and Catherine?)
  Father Clarence-Joseph D'Entremont, in his book, ``Le Canada-Francais Documents sur l'Acadie,'' asserts that the Pierre II who arrived in Acadia as a child married a MicMac woman. The census of 1686 listed Pierre Lejeune III as being married to Marie Thibodeau and Martin LeJeune as being married to Marie-Jeanne Kagijonias, a member of the MicMac tribe. After Marie-Jeanne's death, Martin married Marie Gaudet, the daughter of Jehan (Jean) Gaudet and Marie-Jeanne Henry. A 1693 census lists a sister to Pierre III and Martin named Jeanne, who was married to Francois Joseph, a member of the MicMac tribe.
  Pierre III and Marie Thibodeau had nine children, four boys and five girls.
  The five girls were: Marie-Marguerite, who was born in 1686 and married in 1708 to Jean-Joseph Boutin; Jeanne, born about 1690, who was married in 1712 to Jean Roy II; Marguerite, who was born in 1695 and married in 1714 to Alexandre Trahan; Anne LeJeune, who was born in 1696; Catherine LeJeune, who was born in 1698 and married first Antoine LaBauve dit LaNoue, later Claude-Antoine Duplessis.
  The boys were: Pierre IV, who was born in 1689 and was married in 1712 to Jeanne Benoit; Germain, who was born in 1693 and married Anne-Marie Trahan; Jean, born in 1697, who married Francoise Guedry or Guidry; and Joseph, who was born in 1704 and married to Cecile Pitre in about 1724.
  Martin LeJeune dit Briard had four children with his first wife, Marie-Jeanne Kagijonias, and eight children with his second wife, Marie Gaudet. The three sons born of his first marriage were: Claude, who was born about 1685 and was married in 1705 to Anne-Marie Gaudet; Germain, born in 1689, who married Marie Guedry or Guidry in about 1729; and Bernard, who was born in 1693 and married to Isabelle Saulnier or Sonnier in about 1720. Their only daughter was Anne Lejeune, who was born in 1686 and married in 1702 to Rene LaBouve.
  Following the death of his first wife, Martin Lejeune dit Briard married Marie Gaudet in 1700. It is interesting to note that Martin's son, Claude, married his stepmother's sister two years later.
  Martin Lejeune and Marie Gaudet's eight children were: Theodore; Paul, who was born in 1702 and married in 1727 to Marie Benoit; Martin, Paul's twin, who was married in 1729 to Marie Renaud; Eustache, who was born in 1714 and married in 1747 to Marie-Anne Barriot or Barrilleaux; and Pierre. The three remaining children were girls named Claire, who was born in 1706 and married Francois Viger; Marguerite I; and Marguerite II.
  In order to escape the encroaching and increasingly hostile British, a number of the LeJeune families left for Ile-Royale, present day Cape Breton Island, which was protected by the French fort at Louisbourg. For example, Paul Lejeune and Marie Benoit are shown on the 1752 census at Baie-des-Espagnols, Ile-Royale. The Acadians living on Ile-Royale were not affected by the Acadian deportations of 1755. However, after the fall of Fort Louisbourg to the English during the summer of 1758, there was another round of deportations from Ile-Royale and Ile St-Jean.
  One of the sons of Paul Lejeune and Marie Benoit was named Jean-Baptiste. He was born in 1728 and was married in about 1748 to Marguerite Trahan, the daughter of Etienne Trahan and Francoise Roy. They were listed in the 1752 census as living at Baie-des-Espagnols. The census showed that they lived between the homesteads of Jean-Baptiste's parents and Marguerite's parents. In 1752, they had three children - Jean-Baptiste II, Blaise and Marguerite.
  A mystery surrounds the eventual deportation of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune and his family. The 1763 census of Port Tobacco, Md., shows that the children of Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite were living there at that time. Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite were deceased. However, the census showed that they had two children between 1752 and 1763, both probably born in exile after the deportation. These two children were named Joseph and Nanette. The children were all listed as orphans and living with relatives or friends.
  The mystery is that the Acadians deported from Ile-Royale were all sent to England or France. For example, Jean-Baptiste's mother, Marie Benoit, and at least one of his sisters were deported to France. It is not known why Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite were deported to Maryland. Perhaps they had moved back to the Nova Scotia mainland between 1752 and 1755 and were caught up in the initial round of deportations. Most of the initial deportees of 1755 were scattered among the American colonies.
  In any event, Jean-Baptiste, Blaise, Joseph, Marguerite, and Nanette all eventually left Maryland en route to Louisiana with their uncle, Honore Trahan and his wife, aboard the English schooner Britain. This ship, ill-equipped and barely seaworthy, eventually ran aground near present-day Goliad, Texas. Eventually, the Acadians and the Germans were given Spanish passports for an overland journey to Louisiana. They traveled by land from Goliad to Natchitoches. Somewhere along the way, Nanette Lejeune left the travel party, although it is not known why.
  Marriage 1 Unknown b: ABT. 1603 in Martaize, Vienne, France Married: BEF. 1622 Children Edm´┐Że Aimee LEJEUNE b: 1624 in Port Royal, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada Catherine Briard LEJEUNE b: 1633 in France Or Canada Pierre LEJEUNE b: ABT. 1638 in Martaize, Loudun, Vienne, France Sources: Title: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Publication: Ancestral File, v4.19 Copyright (c) 1987, June 1988, data as of 5 January 1998 Repository: Note: Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84150 USA Call Number: Media: Book
  AND FINALLY
  Corporon/Corpron Entries: 1096 Updated: Sat Jan 5 23:17:05 2002 Contact: Ken Corpron
  ID: I0826 Name: Pierre LEJEUNE Sex: M Birth: 1595 in Martaize, Vienne, France (La Rochelle,France?) Death: in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada Note: Event: Theory ABT. 1636 a farmer from the from Martaize, Poitou region of France, came to Canada with D'Aulnay Event: Theory lived in Port Royal Fort with an Indian wife Event: Theory 1611 came to Acadia with Pointrincourt Event: Theory 1611 occupation: Jesuit Priest Event: Theory ABT. 1619 arrived from France between as a single man and as an engage hired by one of the fur traders Event: Theory 8 SEP 1632 arrived in Acadia wtih Isaac de Razilly Event: Theory 1636 arrived in Acadia on the ship "St Jehan," which sailed from LaRochelle. In checking the passenger lists of this ship, the name LeJeune is not listed Event: Fact We know nothing about him, where he came from, not even his name as the father of Edmee and Catherine, who are the only two documented to be related
  Marriage 1 MicMac Indian WOMAN b: 1610 in Nova Scotia,Canada Married: 1621 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia Children Pierre LEJEUNE II b: 1627 in Brie, France (abt 1625?) Catherine LEJEUNE b: 1633 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada (France?) JUST TWO MORE!!!
  FIRST Autwell Entries: 1515 Updated: Sat Apr 6 07:22:43 2002 Contact: Acevedo
  NOTE Pierre LEJEUNE and his wife, name not known, arrived in Acadia from France by 1636. At the time of their arrival in Acadia,Pierre and his wife had three children. From the 1671 census ofAcadia we can summise that two of the three Lejeune childrenwere the sisters Edmee and Catherine LEJEUNE. The declaration ofClaude PITRE provides us with the name of the third child,Pierre LEJEUNE. This is commensurate with information presentedby d'Entremont in his Histoire de Cap-Sable and in thepreviously quoted work Le Canada-Francais: Documents surL'Acadie. From the ages attributed to the eldest Lejeune child, Edmee, bomabout 1624, and the youngest Lejeune child, Catherine, bornabout 1633, it appears likely that the children were born inFrance and arrived in Acadia with their parents at a young age.The date of the marriage, in Acadia of the eldest daughter,Edmee LeJEUNE to Frangois GAUTEROT in about 1646, is evidencethat the family arrived sometime prior to that time. Using the dates from the census, attributed to his children, wecan hypothesize that from the year of birth of the first child,Edmee, in 1624, the couple was probably married about 1622-1623.We can further hypothesize that, at the time of their marriage,Pierre LEJEUNE Sr. was about 21 or 22 years of age which wouldindicate a birth around 1600. The following are the three known children of Pierre LEJEUNE (I)and his unknown wife, the first Lejeunes in Acadia. It ispossible that there were other childen which have not yet beenfound.
  SECOND Louisiana Acadian Genealogy Entries: 77090 Updated: Mon Nov 4 22:02:26 2002 Contact: Whitney Dartez Home Page: The Dartez Home Page
  Stephen White does not agree with this, he has Edmee and Catherine as sisters without parents and claims Pierre is not related to them. John A. Young, in his book, has reconstruted the Lejeune family in Acadia. Some of the information he presented, states that Pierre Lejeune; along with his unknown French wife and three children Edmee, Pierre and Catherine, the famly came from the region of Poitou, France, and were in the colony prior to 1636. The son Pierre Lejeune; born beteen 1625-32 , married an Unnamed Doucet, daughter of Germain Doucet, and his unknown wife prior to 1656. Clarence J.d'Entremont, in his Histoire du Cap-Sable, Volume 3 page 1121, says that the Lejeune family arrived in Acadia before or during the time of Razilly which would put their arrival around 1635. An individual named Pierre with an unnamed french wife an three children: Edmee, Pierre and Catherine.



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