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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Mary Haines: Birth: ABT 1643.

  2. Samuel* Haines\Haynes: Birth: ABT 1646 in Dover, NH. Death: ABT 1688 in Greenland, NH

  3. Matthias Haines: Birth: ABT 1650.


Sources
1. Title:   WFT VOL3 PED # 2437

Notes
a. Note:   NI08779
Note:   There is a book on the descendants of Deacon Samuel Haines at Higginson Book store
Following from Haines Family Forum - Internet, posted by Al Myers 2/26/1998
"Samuel was apprenticed at age 15 to John Cogswell of Westbury, Wiltshire a cloth manufacturer. Samuel came to America with Cogswell in 1635 on the ship "Angel Gabriel" - the ship anchored Aug 14 near Pemaquid or Bristol and was broken up in a hurricane the next day - they were rescued by another ship and taken to Ipswich where they took up residence. Samuel completed his apprenticeship and returned to Dilton, England to marry Eleanor Neate; they came to Northam (now Dover), NH; he later built a home in the area of Portsmouth and was one of the petitioners to the general court of Mass to change the name from Strawberry Bank to Portsmouth. He was a Deacon in the Church and a sturdy and strong man. He owned and operated a sawmill and held minor civic positions. The surname is presumed to be Welsh, perhaps derived from Eimws ("son of Einion"). Dilton, where Samuel and Eleanor married, was known for its manufacture of woolen cloth. The town name probably derives from Dyllan-tun, meaning Dyalla`s or Dulla`s farmstead. The place is now known as Old Dilton, in distinction from the newer towm of Dilton Marsh to the northwest. Who were his parents, etc? "
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and from the internet web-site of:
Phillip Haines Sherrod 4410 Gerald Place Nashville, TN 37205-3806 United States 615-292-2881 phil.sherrod@@sandh.com
Generation No. 1
1. SAMUEL1 HAINES, ("DEACON") was born 1611 in England, and died Abt. 1686 in Portsmouth, NH. He married ELLENOR NEATE April 01, 1638 in Dilton, Wiltshire, England.
Notes for SAMUEL HAINES, ("DEACON"): Samuel Haines was born in England in 1611. At fifteen years of age he was apprenticed to John Cogswell of Westbury, Wiltshire, a cloth manufacturer, who owned mills in Frome, Somersetshire, a few miles from Westbury. It appears that his apprenticeship was to continue for ten years; but after having served nine years, he came to New England in 1635 with Mr. Cogswell in the ship Angel Gabriel, which sailed from Kings Roads, Bristol, England, June 4, and from Milford Haven, Wales, on the 22nd of the same month.
After a voyage of ten weeks and two days from Bristol, coming near the coast of Maine, they anchored on the night of the 14th of August in the outer harbor of Permaquid, now Bristol; and there they encountered the "Great Hurricane" which occurred on the following day, when the storm was so severe that the vessel was driven on shore and broken to pieces; and although several persons perished, and much of the cargo was destroyed, yet they saved a considerable quantity of their personal effects, so that they were able to live on the shore in a tent, which Mr. Cogswell had taken with him, until the arrival of Goodman Gallup's bark from Boston, which took them with a large portion of their possessions to Ipswich, Mass., where Mr. Cogswell made his home.
Samuel Haines remained with him one year to complete the term of his apprenticeship; and having fulfilled his obligations for service, he outlined plans for the future in this then wild country, doubtless arranging to cast in his lot with the settlers at Northam, now called Dover Point.
In 1638 he returned to England, prolonging his visit one and a half years, and in the meantime, on April 1, 1638, was married to Ellenor Neate in the church at Dilton, Wiltshire, near Westbury, where he had previously lived. As he was married within a few weeks after returning to his native land, it is safe to infer that he was engaged to his bride before coming to this country, and that he made the long and perilous voyage across the sea that he might claim the lady of his choice.
On his return to this country they established their home in Northam, where he had ten acres of land near the first church. Afterwards there were set off to him twenty acres on the west side of Back River. He had for neighbors WWilliam Furber and John Tuttle, and perhaps others who were fellow passengers with him on the ship Angel Gabriel.
The patent of land on which he settled had been granted to Edward Hilton, but conveyed to him by Capt. Thomas Wiggin and his associates, who were from Shrewsbury, England, where the early Haines family lived. Such may have been a factor in the choice of location of our first ancestor.
We find that Samuel Haines was one of the signers on Oct. 16, 1640, of what was called the "Dover Combination." This must have been shortly after he had established his home at Northam, where he remained ten years. He was taxed in Dover in 1648 and 1649.
Either because he was not satisfied with his location, or because he saw that it would be more profitable, in 1650 he rented Capt. Francis Champernown's farm at Strawberry Bank, so named because of the strawberries found there. In company with Lieut. Neal he took the farm "to the thirds." It appears that he took a deed of the farm for the satisfying of a "certain debte," and that he lived there two years. In the meantime he secured ninety-one acres of land adjoining the Champernown farm, where he built himself a house and made a permanent home. By purchase and by grant of common lands from the town he came into posession of many acres.
He chose a very desirable location for his house, on a well-drained ridge of land which now commands a pleasing view of the surrounding country. Ther could have been but a small hamlet where he settled; for there were at that time but fifty or sixty families in what now constitutes New Castle, Portsmouth, Greenland, and Newington. The larger part of the country around was as yet unsubdued by ax or plow, so the comforts and privileges were comparatively few. Travel to the more thickly settled part of the town was by water, or by a circuitous and rough path through the forest. The Indians were a menace, and waild animals were in the woods. Foreign supplies must have been costly and few, and the support of a family was the price of unceasing toil, while educational and religious privileges were obtained only by great effort.
Our ancestor seems to have been sturdy and strong, for he was able to more than hold his own. In addition to the large tract of land which he had secured, he bought a part of the saw-mill which was located near his home, paying for it one hundred and ten pounds. He was a highly respected citizen, and occupied important positions of trust.
But there were adversaries to contend with as well as a rigorous climate and hard soil. In 1683, after he had made his land pleasant with the labor of thirty years, Robert Mason, Esq., laid claim to it, together with that of others, and tried to eject him, but without success. In the following year he made a second effort, putting the land-holders under bond to appear in court at New Castle, but his plans did not succeed. The titles were good.
The four towns within the limits of New Hampshire, having put themselves under the protection of the colony of Massachusetts, in 1653, Samuel Haines was one of the signers, petitioning the General Court at boston to change the name of the town from Strawberry Bank to Portsmouth, which was done. The same year he was chosen one of the selectmen of Portsmouth, to which office he was elected for ten successive years. In 1666 he was employed to assist in running the town line between Portsmouth and Hampton. In 1678 the town intrusted to him the keeping of an orphan child for a period of fifteen years for a stipulated sum of money.
Aside from his business sagacity he was a religious man, being one of the number who organized the North Church in Portsmouth; and as soon as Reb. Joshua Moodey was settled as their pastor, he was ordained Deacon of the church by the "imposition of hands and prayer." This was in 1671, although religious services had been held in town for the greater part of the time since 1638. In 1675 the town granted "Deacon Haines" the privilege of hitching his horse in "the pound" on Sundays for shelter and protection. It was a long distance for him to travel to church, and that act indicates that he made the journey sometimes in rough weather.
When by the weight of years his infirmities increased, he deemed it wise to deed his homestead to his eldest son, Samuel, reserving a sufficient life support for himself and wife. The exact date of his death s not on record; but it must have occured about 1686, at the age of abut seventy-five years. His wife was living at the time he made his will in 1682, but the exact date of her death is not determined.
They were buried on a bold promontory jutting a little into the Winnicut, thirty or forty feet above the river, -- a beautiful, quiet spot, now covered witha wooded growth, at the foot of which the tide has ebbed and flowed by their graves for almost two and a quarter centuries. At this place it is said that more than one hundred of the first settlers of the town of Greenland have been laid away. This "God's acre" is but a short distance from the old Haines homestead.
Children of SAMUEL HAINES, ("DEACON") and ELLENOR NEATE are: 2. i. MARY2 HAINES, b. 1643, Dover. 3. ii. SAMUEL HAINES, b. 1646, Dover, NH; d. 1688-1689, Greenland, NH. 4. iii. MATTHIAS HAINES, b. 1650, Portsmouth, NH; d. 1688-1689.
and from
Leah McKin 110 Fanmar Way Capitola, California 95010-3343 lmckin7884@@aol.com
"From Savage's A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New England, Vol. II 2492 HAYNES, SAMUEL, Dover 1640, came in the Angel Gabriel, 1635, from Bristol, wh. was wreck. at Pemaquid in the gr. storm of 15 Aug.; prob. rem. to Portsmouth 1646, was selectman 1653, and after one of the found. of the ch. there, and deac. 1671, was liv. 21 May 1684. His ch. were Samuel, b. 1646; Matthias, a. 1650; and Elizabeth or Mary, wh. m. says Quint, in Geneal. Reg. IX. 367, Samuel, but it may have been Leonard, Weeks, bef. 1682, prob. as 2d w. Adams, 55. Belkn. I. 65. SAMUEL, Portsmouth, s. of the preced. m. 9 Jan. 1673, Mary Fifield, prob. d. of Giles of Hampton, had Sarah, b. 6 Oct. foll.; Elinor, 23 Aug. 1675; Matthias, [[vol. 2, p. 391]] 7 Mar. 1677; William, 7 Jan. 1679; Mary, 27 Jan. 1686; and Samuel, 5 July 1687. Descend. spell their name Haines. THOMAS, Sudbury, perhaps br. of Walter, or John, or both, d. 28 July 1640. THOMAS, Maine 1658-1665. Perhaps he rem. to Amesbury, m. 26 Dec. 1667, Martha Burnet (in Geneal. Reg. VI. 342, print. Bartlett), of Salisbury, and d. 1683, leav. wid. wh. m. Samuel Bucknam, and ch. of the ages foll. Thomas, 13; Ellen, 9; Aquila, 5; John, 3; and Mary, 1 1/2. He may have been s. of Richard. THOMAS, Amesbury, s. of the first William, took o. of fidel. 20 Dec. 1677, m. 15 Dec. 1676, Sarah Rea, had John, b. 14 Apr. 1678; William, 25 Oct. 1680; Sarah, 31 Oct. 1681; Joseph, 18 Oct. 1683; Benjamin, 21 Sept. 1685; Daniel, 25 Aug. 1687, d. young; Hannah, 25 Sept. 1689; and Thomas, 17 Oct. 1691. THOMAS, Haverhill, s. of Jonathan of the same, m. 22 Dec. 1703, Hannah Harriman, perhaps d. of Matthew of the same, had Lydia, b. 7 Aug. 1705; Hannah, 22 Mar. 1707; Mehitable, 22 Jan. 1709; Sarah, 9 Jan. 1711; Jonathan, 25 Apr. 1712; Joseph, 5 Feb. 1715; and Elizabeth 4 Feb. 1717. His w. d. 12 Feb. 1761; and he d. 6 Dec. 1771.
From Hall's Rambles About Greenland in Rhyme, pp. 175-176 2375 [Begins with notation: "From A. M. Haines's account."] Samuel Haines, deacon of the First Congregational Church of Portsmouth, N.H., was born about the year 1611, and came over to New England in the ship "Angel Gabriel," 240 tons, which sailed from Bristol, England, June 4th, 1635, and was wrecked at "Pemaquid," now Bristol, Maine, in the 'great hurricane' of 15th of August, in the same year. He was at Ipswich in 1635-6; returned to England about 1640 where he remained about a year and a half; was at Dover in 1640-9 and finally settled at Portsmouth, in the parish of Greenland, in the year 1650, where he continued to reside on his farm, on the Great Bay, on the east side of the Winnicut river, until his decease, which was subsequent to the 21st of May, 1684, or about 1686-7. He was one of the Selectmen of Portsmouth from 1653 to 1663, one of nine founders, and ordained a deacon of the First Congregational Church at its organization, 1671. He held many other offices of trust in the gift of his fellow townsmen, the duties of which were discharged with fidelity. The old homestead was enjoyed for three generations by the eldest son as desired by Deacon Samuel, as follows; -- Samuel Jr. (2d gen.) who 1688-9 when it passed to his son Matthias (3d gen.), who occupied it until his decease, 9 April 1745, when it passed by will to his son Samuel (4th gen.) b. 20 April, 1716, who sold it the 19 Feb'y 1766 to Enoch Clark, inn-holder for 500�, from whom it descended to Enoch II. Clark.
From Hall's Rambles About Greenland in Rhyme, p. 79 2375 "At a public meeting held the 12th of Sept. 1653, granted unto Samuel Haines ten ackers [sic] of land at the bottom of the great Bay, over against Capt. Champernowns--so that it be not upon the Captains land." Taken out of the "ould book." In 1653 there were but fifty or sixty families in the limits of what now comprises Portsmouth, Newcastle, Ry/e, Greenland, and Newington.
From Hall's Rambles About Greenland in Rhyme, p. 88 2375 Dec. 18. '90 acres laid out for Deacon Haines on the N. W. side of Hampton highway to a little brook, and Leo. Weeks [his son-in-law; married to daughter Mary] land on north side of it.
From Reiss' Angel Gabriel; The Elusive English Galleon, p. 57 2185 Samuel Haines, who had been an apprentice to the Cogswells in England for nine years, lived with the Cogswells in Ipswich for three years before returning to England. While in England in 1638, he married Eleanor Neate. They returned to New England, bringing some goods back for John Cogswell, and settled in Dover, New Hampshire, where his neighbors included William Furber and John Tuttle. Haines was a Dover selectman in 1653 and 1663, served on the grand jury, and bought half interest in a saw mill in 1670. He and Eleanor had three children: Mary, Mathias, and Samuel. The Lockheeds, of Lockheed Aircraft, are direct descendants of Samuel Haines.
From Haines Deacon Samuel Haines, pp. 19-22 2175 Samuel Haines was born in England in 1611. At fifteen years of age he was apprenticed to John Cogswell of Westbury, Wiltshire, a cloth manufacturer, who owned mills in Frome, Somersetshire, a few miles from Westbury. It appears that his apprenticeship was to continue for ten years; but after having served nine years, he came to New England in 1635 with Mr. Cogswell in the ship Angel Gabriel, which sailed from Kings Roads, Bristol, England, June 4, and from Milford Haven, Wales, on the 22d of the same month. After the voyage of ten weeks and two days from Bristol, coming near the coast of Maine, they anchored on the night of the 14th of August in the outer harbor of Pemaquid, now Bristol; and there they encountered the "Great Hurricane," which occurred on the following day, when the storm was so severe that the vessel was driven on shore and broken in pieces; an although several persons perished, and much of the cargo was destroyed, yet they saved a considerable quantity of their personal effects, so that they were able to live on the shore in a tent, which Mr. Cogswell had taken with him, until the arrival of Goodman Gallup's bark from Boston, which took them with a large portion of their possessions to Ipswich, Mass., where Mr. Cogswell made his home. Samuel Haines remained with him one year to complete the term of his apprenticeship; and having fulfilled his obligations for service, he outlined plans for the future in this then wild country, doubtless arranging to cast in his lot with the settlers at Northam, now called Dover Point. In 1638 he returned to England, prolonging his visit one and a half years, and in the meantime, on April 1, 1638, was married to Ellenor Neate in the church at Dilton, Wiltshire, near Westbury, where he had previously lived. As he was married within a few weeks after returning to his native land, it is safe to infer that he was engaged to his bride before coming to this country, and that he made the long and perilous voyage across the sea that he might claim the lady of his choice. On his return to this country they established their home in Northam, where he had ten acres of land near the first church. Afterwards there were set off to him twenty acres on the west side of Back River. He had for neighbors William Furber and John Tuttle, and perhaps others who were fellow passengers with him on the ship Angel Gabriel. The patent of land on which he settled had been granted to Edward Hilton, but conveyed by him to Capt. Thomas Wiggin and his associates, who were from Shrewsbury, England, where the early Haines family lived. Such may have been a factor in the choice of location of our first ancestor. We find that Samuel Haines was one of the signers on Oct. 16, 1640, of what was called the "Dover Combination." This must have been shortly after he had established his home at Northam, where he remained ten years. He was taxed in Dover in 1648 and 1649. Either because he was not satisfied with his location, or because he saw that it would be more profitable, in 1650 he rented Capt. Francis Champernown's farm at Strawberry Bank, so named because of the strawberries found there. In company with Lieut. Neal he took the farm "to the thirds." It appears that he took a deed of the farm for the satisfying of a "certain debte," and that he lived there two years. In the meantime he secured ninety-one acres of land adjoining the Champernown farm, where he built himself a house and made a permanent home. By purchase and by grant of common lands from the town he came into possession of many acres. He chose a very desirable location for his house, on a well-drained ridge of land which now commands a pleasing view of the surrounding country. There could have been but a small hamlet where he settled; for there were at that time but fifty or sixty families in what now constitutes New Castle, Portsmouth, Greenland, and Newington. The larger part of the country around was as yet unsubdued by ax or plow, so the comforts and privileges were comparatively few. Travel to the more thickly settled part of the town was by water, or by a circuitous and rough path through the forest. The Indians were a menace, and wild animals were in the woods. Foreign supplies must have been costly and few, and the support of a family was the price of unceasing toll, while educational and religious privileges were obtained only by great effort. Our ancestor seems to have been sturdy and strong, for he was able to more than hold his own. In addition to the large tract of land which he had secured, he bought a part of the saw-mill which was located near his home, paying for it one hundred and ten pounds. He was a highly respected citizen, and occupied important positions of trust. But there were adversaries to contend with as well as a rigorous climate and hard soil. In 1683, after he had made his land pleasant with the labor of thirty years, Robert Mason Esq. laid claim to it, together with that of others, and tried to eject him, but without success. In the following year he made a second effort, putting the land-holders under bond to appear in court at New Castle, but his plans did not succeed. The titles were good. The four towns with the limits of New Hampshire, having put themselves under the protection of the Colony of Massachusetts, in 1653 Samuel Haines was one of the signers, petitioning the General Court at Boston to change the name of the town from Strawberry Bank to Portsmouth, which was done. The same year he was chosen one of the selectmen of Portsmouth, to which office he was elected for ten successive years. In 1666 he was employed to assist in running the town line between Portsmouth and Hampton. In 1678 the town intrusted [sic] to him the keeping of an orphan child for a period of fifteen years for a stipulated sum of money. Aside from his business sagacity he was a religious man, being one of the number who organized the North Church in Portsmouth; and as soon as Rev. Joshua Moodey was settled as their pastor, he was ordained Deacon of the church by the "imposition of hands and prayer." This was in 1671, although religious services had been held in town for the greater part of the time since 1638. In 1675 the town granted "Deacon Haines" the privilege of hitching his horse in "the pound" on Sundays for shelter and protection. It was a long distance for him to travel to church, and that act indicates that he made the journey sometimes in rough weather. When by the weight of years his infirmities increased, he deemed it wise to deed his homestead to his eldest son, Samuel, reserving a sufficient life support for himself and wife. The exact date of his death is not on record; but it must have occurred about 1686, at the age of about seventy-five years. His wife was living at the time he made his will in 1682, but the exact date of her death is not determined. They were buried on a bold promontory jutting a little into the Winnicut, thirty or forty feet above the river,--a beautiful, quiet spot, now covered with a wooded growth, at the foot of which the tide has ebbed and flowed by their graves for almost two and a quarter centuries. At this place it is said that more than one hundred of the first settlers of the town of Greenland have been laid away. This "God's acre" is but a short distance from the old Haines homestead.
From "The Dover Combination" 2329 Samuel Haines, in 1640, signed "The Dover Combination," a petition for a civil government, which was intended to keep the settlement separate from the Massachusetts colony. The petition, a copy of which was found in the Public Record Office in London, reads: "Whereas sundry Mischeifes and inconveniences have befaln us, and more and greater may in regard of want of Civill Government, his Gratious Matie haveing hitherto setled no Order for us to our Knowledge: "Wee whose names are underwritten being Inhabitants upon the River Piscataquack have voluntarily agreed to combine our Selves into a Body Politique that wee may the more comfortably enjoy the benefit of his Maties Lawes. And do hereby actually ingage our Selves to Submit to his Royal Maties Lawes together with all such Orders as shalbee concluded by a Major part of the Freemen of our Society, in case they bee not repugnant to the Lawes of England and administred in the behalfe of his Majesty. "And this wee have Mutually promised and concluded to do and so to continue till his Excellent Matie shall give other Order concerning us. "In Witness wee have hereto Set our hands the two & twentieth day of October in the Sixteenth yeare of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord Charles by the grace of God King of Great Brittain France & Ireland Defender of the Faith &c Annoq Domi: 1640."
From Lyford's History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hamphire, 1727-1912, pp. 171-172 2343 Among the passengers of the ship Angel Gabriel in 1635 were John Cogswell of Westbury, near Wiltshire, Eng., a cloth manufacturer, and his apprentice, Samuel Haines. The latter, at the end of his term of service, returned to Wiltshire, where he had been b. in 1611. He m. at Dalton in April, 1638, Ellenor Neate. Setting sail for America, he settled at Northam, now Dover Point, on ten acres of land near the first church. Here he remained ten years. On 16 Oct., 1640, Samuel Haines was one of the signers of the Dover Combination. He was taxed in Dover 1648 and 1649. In 1650, in company with Lieut. Neal, he rented Francis Champernoun's farm at Strawberry Bank, securing ninety-one acres adjoining, where he built his house and made his home. By purchase and by town grants, he came into possession of many acres. In 1653 he was one of the signers petitioning the General Court of Massachusetts to change the name of the town to Portsmouth. 1653 to 1663 he was selectman. In 1666 he assisted in running the town line between Portsmouth and Hampton. He was one of the original members of the North Church, settling the Rev. Joshua Moody as pastor. 11 July, 1671, he was ordained Dea. "by the laying on of hands." 1675 he was granted the privilege of hitching his horse in "the pound" for shelter and protection on Sundays. He deeded, 28 Dec., 1682, his homestead to his eldest son, Samuel, reserving a sufficient support for himself and his wife. He d. about 1686.
Samuel Haines is named as one of the "early householders on the east side of High Street" in the History of Dover, New Hampshire. 2374
From Stearns Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire, pp. 815-816 2693 Haines The name is traced back in Wales to A.D., 607. In the fifteenth and the early part of the sixteenth centuries it was variously written in England as Eines, Eynes, Heynes, Heanes, Haines, and Haynes, but the pronunciation was probably the same in all. Einion, Prince of Powys, was distinguished in the wars against Henry I of England, A.D., 1100-1135. Some members of the family served with the with the Crusaders, and were granted coats of arms, in token of appreciation of their services; the first was conferred about A.D., 1300. (I) Deacon Samuel Haines came to New England in 1635, with John Cogswell, of Westbury, Wiltshire, England, a cloth manufacturer, with whom he had "served his time," learning the trade, as was the old custom. They came on the ship "Angel Gabriel" which sailed from King's Roads, Bristol, England, June 4, of that year, and from Milford Haven, Wales, on the 22d of the same month. After a voyage of ten weeks and two days from Bristol, they were wrecked at Pemaquid, now Bristol, in the "great hurricane" of the following August 15. An account of this wreck is given in the genealogy of Cogswell in this work, which see. Samuel Haines accompanied his master to Ipswich, Massachusetts, and remained with him one year to complete his apprenticeship, and then went to Dover and settled with Captain Thomas Wiggin's Company on Dover Neck. There he remained two years, and then returned to England and married Ellenor Neate, in the church at Dilton, Wiltshire, near Westby, where he had previously lived. The old parish register of Dilton, hamlet of Westbury, county of Wilts, Anno Domini, 1638, has this: "William Hucketts and Jane Pierce were marryed the first day of April. Samuel Haines and Ellenor Neate were marryed the same day." It is probably that Samuel Haines made that visit on purpose to be married, as the ceremony in the church occurred a few weeks after his arrival there. After passing the "honey moon" in his own home, the young couple sailed for New England, and in the course of several weeks arrived at Dover Neck and set up housekeeping in a house he built on ten acres of land the town had granted him on Low street near the Old Meeting House. Later the town granted him twenty acres on the west side of Back river. He had for neighbors William Furber and John Tuttle. In 1640 the citizens of Dover formed a combination for government, as there was then no well established government to rule over them. Samuel Haines was one of the signers, on October 16 of that year, and remained on Dover Neck ten years or more, as he was taxed there in 1649. He took a deed November 18, 1650, from Captain Francis Champernoon, of Portsmouth, then called Strawberry Bank, a farm "by ye name of Capt. Champernoon, his ffarme, lying and being on ye southeast side of ye Great baye, for and in consideration of the sum of Ninetie pounds Sterling," etc. On September 12, 1653, the town granted him ten acres "at the bottom of Great baye over against Capt. Champernoons." July 5, 1660, he was granted ninety-one acres more. Later he received other grants of land, so that he became possessed of several hundred acres, all in the vicinity of Great Bay, in that part of old Portsmouth, now Greenland. On that farm he spent the years of his life, from 1650 till his death, about 1686; a most beautiful locality, the village of Greenland. In 1671 he was ordained deacon of the North Church by the "imposition of hands and prayer." Henceforth he was known as Deacon Haines. During his thirty-six years' residence on Champernoon farm Great Bay, Deacon Haines took an active part in the public affairs of the town. In 1653 he was elected one of the selectmen of Portsmouth, which office he held ten years in succession. In 1675 the town granted to "Deacon Haines ye privilege of hitching his horse in ye Pound on Sundays for shelter and protection." It was a long distance from his farm to the North Meeting House, which stood where the North Church now stands on Market Square, Portsmouth, and the vote of the town indicates that the deacon attended meetings in rough and stormy weather, and took good care of his team. The date of the deaths of Deacon Haines and his good wife is not recorded, but they were both dead before 1690, and they were buried on a bold promontory jutting a little into the Winnicut river, in the ancient burying ground of the first settlers, but a short distance from the old Haines homestead. To Deacon Samuel and Ellenor (Neate) Haines were born three children: Mary, Samuel, and Matthias, whose sketch follows."


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