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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Lady Elizabeth Seymour: Birth: 1685. Death: 02 APR 1734

  2. Lady Catherine Seymour: Birth: 1693. Death: 09 APR 1731

  3. Lady Anne Seymour: Birth: 1709. Death: 27 NOV 1722

  4. Algernon Seymour 7th Duke of Somerset: Death: 07 FEB 1749


Family
Marriage:
Notes
a. Note:   Elizabeth Percy managed to have 3 husbands, the first 2 dying shortly after their marriages. Between the years 1710-1714, Elizabeth was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Anne. Elizabeth brought immense estates to her husbands and in addition her residences: Alnwick Castle Petworth House Syon House Northumberland House in London. The Duke and Duchess were among the Queen's oldest friends, with whom she had taken refuge in 1692 after a violent quarrel with William III and Mary. LIke the Duke of Marlborough before him, Somerset used his wife's position as confidante to advance his career. Both of them became the target of violent verbal attacks, especially from Swift who hoped to influence the Queen through Abigail Masham, the obvious rival for the position of confidante. Apparently against Mrs. Masham's wish he published a violent diatribe , The Windsor Prophecy, against the Duchess, referred to as " Carrots " ( a common nickname derived from the Duchess' red hair). Swift explicitly accused the Duchess of murdering her second husband, and wildly suggested she might poison the Queen " I have been told, they assassin when young and poison when old". The Queen was outraged and from then on refused to consider Swift for preferment; but insisted on retaining the Duchess. The Duke's pride and arrogance eventually wore out the Queen's patience and he was dismissed his Court offices early in 1712. The Queen's doctor , Sir David Hamilton, advised her to keep the Duchess in her service " for her own quiet ": and the Queen agreed. The Duchess remained with the Queen to the end by which time Lord Dartmouth described her as " much the greatest favourite." Elizabeth's influence on the Queen, together with her colourful past, made many enemies : like her husband she seems to have been proud, although Dartmouth called her " the best bred as well as the best born person in England ". She showed great skill in dealing with the Queen, her secret, it was said being , never to press the Queen to do anything, in contrast to Abigail Masham who constantly pressed for favours.


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