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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Thomas Mayo: Birth: ABT 1774 in Abbeville County, South Carolina. Death: 1814 in Died in the Army

  2. Sarah Mayo: Birth: ABT 1776 in Abbeville County, South Carolina.

  3. Daughter Mayo: Birth: ABT 1778 in Abbeville County, South Carolina.

  4. Daughter Mayo: Birth: ABT 1784 in Abbeville County, South Carolina.

  5. Daughter Mayo: Birth: ABT 1790 in Abbeville County, South Carolina.

  6. ALFRED FRANKLIN MAYO: Birth: 1792 in Abbeville County, South Carolina. Death: ABT 1858 in Florida or Louisiana


Notes
a. Note:   Food for Thought: In the late-1750s, a small contingent of French Huguenots, along with a small group of Germans, settled in what is present-day McCormick County. The Old "Ninety-Six" District of South Carolina was created (original) in 1769 and was abolished in 1798. It consisted of (present-day) Abbeville Co. (formed 1785); Part of Abbeville Co. to Greenwood Co. (formed 1897); Part of Abbeville Co. to McCormick Co. (formed 1916); Edgefield Co. (formed 1785); Part of Edgefield to Aiken Co. (formed 1871); Part of Edgefield to Greenwood Co. (formed 1897); Part of Edgefield to Saluda Co. (formed 1896); Laurens Co. (formed 1785); Newberry Co. (formed 1785); Spartanburg Co. (formed 1785); Part of Spartbg. Co. to Cherokee Co. (formed 1897); Union Co. (formed 1798); Part of Union. Co. to Cherokee Co. (formed 1897). The 96th Dist. from 1785 to 1798 consisted of present day Union Co. McCormick County; the county was formed in 1916 from parts of Edgefield, Abbeville, and Greenwood counties. This area was part of Old 96 District, and was settled in the mid-eighteenth century by Scotch-Irish, French Huguenots, and German farmers. Some of the early inhabitants were massacred by Cherokee Indians at Long Cane in 1760, and the British subsequently built Fort Charlotte to protect the region; this fort was one of the first seized by the Americans in the Revolutionary War.] The last French coloney New Bordeaux, a small settlement founded in 1764 in Abbeville County located near Little River not far from its confluence with the Savannah River, was mostly settled by those who either came from the Bordeaux region of France or for whom it was the point of departure from France to South Carolina. In 1761, three "new" townships were created by the Bounty Act in the backcountry area of South Carolina. Boonesborough Township was set aside for the Scots-Irish. Londonborough Township was set aside, once again, for the Swiss/Palatines, which included many French Huguenots. Hillsborough Township was set aside for French Huguenots. Hillsborough Township was settled in 1764 by 200 French Huguenots and they established the town of New Bordeaux that year. In 1765, they established the town of New Rochelle. These settlements were in the present-day counties of McCormick and Abbeville. Londonborough Township was settled in 1765 by 300 Swiss immigrants, many of whom were French Huguenots. This settlement was in the present-day counties of McCormick and Edgefield. In the first United States census of 1790 - only fifteen years after the Royal Period - South Carolina's population included approximately 3.9% with French heritage, much more than the 1.7% as found in North Carolina the same year. New Bordeaux, established in 1764, was the only French settlement in the South Carolina piedmont (Moragne 1857; Davis 1951; Gibert 1976). This town was located at the confluence of Long Cane Creek and Little River, tributaries of the Savannah River in present day McCormick County. A 1765 plat of the New Hillsborough Township drawn by Patrick Calhoun, survives, as do numerous individual lot plats within the town of New Bordeaux, but no detailed town plan has been found. The portion of Calhoun�s plan, which includes New Bordeaux, is reproduced in Figure 2. The original plan of New Bordeaux called for an 800 acre tract containing 198 house lots, measuring 1/2 acre, 300 acres of glebe land, 176 acres for vineyards (4 acre lots), 195 acres for commons, and 25 acres to be used for a fortified church yard, parsonage, market place, parade ground, public mill, and streets. New Bordeaux town was organized in 2 acre blocks surrounded by streets. House lots within the town were granted as late as 1774. The town served as a place of refuge during the American Revolution, but was probably abandoned soon after the war and the present town of Bordeaux was established several miles away. These French Huguenots may be the clue as to the ancestry of Alfred Mayo whom I believe to be the son of Thomas Mayo of Abbeville County, South Carolina. 1. LAND PURCHASE: State Plats COM Index pp. 12946-12947 Roll # ST 604: ENTRY NBRS 0009 008 0022 00120 01 Thomas was in Old Ninety Six District when he purchased two hundred fifty two acres from John White, on waters of Fair Forrest Creek, Ninety Six District, surveyed by Jesse Connell on 1785/05/02. 2. Thomas Mayo is listed in the 1790 Nineth Six District, Abbeville County census, 1m>16, 1m<16, 5f. 3. ADMINISTRATOR: MAYO THOMAS, JR.-BOX 108, PACK 2996: Est. admnr. Oct. 16, 1815 by Thos. Mayo Sr., Wm. Thompson, David Fife unto Taliaferro Livingston Ord. Abbeville Dist. sum 1,000 lbs. Cit. pub. at Hopewell Church. 4. Martin Mayo stated in the 1900 Census Louisiana, Natchitoches Parish, Page 337a, 10 Ward, age 80 b. South Carolina, Father b. France, now we know Alfred Mayo was not born in France as shown by the 1850 Holmes County, Florida census, however, at his advanced age it is entirely possible Martin mixed up his Grandfather�s birthplace with his fathers. Martin Mayo also stated in his CSA pension application he was born 4/15/1820 in Bordal District, South Carolina, Could this be a misspelling of Bordeaux? This area falls in the exact region we find Thomas Mayo and his family from ca 1785 until 1815. 5. The DNA test from proven descendents of Alfred is very different from the other Mayo lines in the colonies. ****************************************** LAND PURCHASE: State Plats COM Index pp. 12946-12947 Roll # ST 604: ENTRY NBRS 0009 008 0022 00120 01 Thomas was in Old Ninety Six District when he purchased two hundred fifty two acres from John White, on waters of Fair Forrest Creek, Ninety Six District, surveyed by Jesse Connell on 1785/05/02. ABSTRACTS OF OLD NINETY-SIX AND ABBEVILLE DISTRICT WILLS AND BONDS by W. Pauline Young. WILL EXECUTOR: FOSTER, ANDREW-BOX 34, PACK 749: Will dated Oct. 17, 1780 in 96 Dist. Proved Nov. 11, 1783. Exrs- Jno. Foster, Isaac Patton. Wit: Wm. Patton, Thos. Mayes, Robt. Harris. Was of Fair Forest. Wife, Margaret Foster. Dtr., Jane Foster. Other legatees: Joseph Nesbett, Moses, Jno. Foster, Isaac Patton, Wm. McCellan, Geo. Storey. BUYER: THOMSON, JOHN-BOX 92, PACK 2266: Will dated Dec. 28, 1780 in 96 Dist. Prov. Nov. 1, 1783. Exrs: Wife, Ann Thompson. Bro., Wm. Thompson. Wit: John Davidson, Nicholas, Robt. Harris, Geo. Park. Chn: Richard, Ephraim, Andrew, John, Wm., Margaret, Mary, Ann Thompson. Mother, Elenor Harper. Inv. made Dec. 13, 1783, by Robt. Harris, Andrew Mayes, John Davidson. Sale, Dec. 29, 1783. Byrs: Ann Thomson, Elenor Harper, Jas. Crawford, Andrew, Richard Thomson, Andrew Mayes, Daniel Jackson, Thos. Mayes, Patrick Shaw, Saml. Jackson, Wm. Shaw. (Name written Thompson, Thomson) ADMINISTRATOR: MAYS THOMAS, JR.-BOX 108, PACK 2996: Est. admnr. Oct. 16, 1815 by Thos. Mays Sr., Wm. Thompson, David Fife unto Taliaferro Livingston Ord. Abbeville Dist. sum 1,000 lbs. Cit. pub. at Hopewell Church. Thos. Mays, Jr. was late of the Army of the U. S. [the original papers show this to be Mayo] These French Huguenots may be the clue as to the ancestry of Alfred Mayo whom I believe to be the son of Thomas Mayo of Abbeville County, South Carolina


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