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  1. Person Not Viewable

  2. Stillborn Wolda: Birth: 02 DEC 1935 in Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands. Death: 02 DEC 1935 in Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands

  3. Stillborn Wolda: Birth: 09 APR 1937 in Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands. Death: 09 APR 1937 in Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands


Sources
1. Title:   Burgelijke Stand Scheemda Burgelijke Stand Coevorden
CallNumber:   001
Givenname:   Book
Name:   Book
RepositoryId:   R23
Repository:   R23
Note continued:   Source Medium: Book
2. Title:   Burgelijke Stand Finsterwolde
CallNumber:   001
Givenname:   Book
Name:   Book
RepositoryId:   R23
Repository:   R23
Note continued:   Source Medium: Book

Notes
a. Note:   As a 14-year old, on 8 April 1919, my father Willem Derk Wolda left Oostwold to learn the plumbing trade with his uncle Hendrik Jalvingh in Klazienaveen. Here he met Barteld Menkveld from Coevorden whom we will meet later. He returns on 10 November 1922 and departs for Noordbroek on 3 September 1924 to work as a plumber in Noordbroek for a while, and then started work for gebroeders Van der Weert, plumbers, on the Stationstraat in Wageningen. Together with the fam Van den Berg he built a duplex, 2 1/2 story, house on the Diedenweg in Wageningen and with the tossing of a coin managed to get the southern (sunny) side of the house. Here he moved after he married Gepke Paap and here Henkie (Hindrik=me) was born. Father played the mandoline and the cither for a while, but then became to busy with other things. He trained policedogs, among which there was Tarzan, a national champion. We rented rooms to students of the Agricultural University. His early training in making waterpumps etc. out of copper he made to good use by making all sorts of beautiful copper things such as waterkettles, flower pots, oil lamps, a billiard table, a wheelbarrow, etc. This culminated in a real working model of a steam engine that was unfortunately stolen with many other items during our absence in 1944-45 (see below). In 10 May 1940 the Germans invaded the country and as we were just in front of the main Dutch defense line of the Grebbeberg the city had to be evacuated. On a long series of barges we went westward to go to Rotterdam, but those plans had to change after the Germans carpetbombed the center of that city. So we stayed at a farmhouse in Langerak, not too far from Schoonhoven, province of Zuid Holland. When we returned home after the Dutch had surrendered, our house and belongings were remarkably intact. Many houses had been broken into while the owners were absent, but ours was not. Were those robbers friends of ours?? The student who happened to be living with us just after the German invasion, Johan Koeslag from Laren (Gelderland), became very much involved with the underground, especially with the hiding en repatriation of downed allied pilots. Father also became very active in the underground. Until the evacuation at the end september 1944 we had jews hidden in our house, an elderly Polish couple Max Gross and his wife and Eric Pinto, a tobacco salesmen from Amsterdam. In spite of some critical moments and the problems of getting food for them without legal ration books, we all survived the war. In September 1944 operation Market Garden, the battle of Arnhem occurred. We saw the gliders and paratroopers coming down on the Ginkelse Hei, a few miles away, but things went bad. Then the British and Polish troops finally came at the other -south- side of the river Rhine and we were directly in the line of fire of their artillery. So we had to be evacuated again. The plan was that all of us were to go to the west to Amsterdam and surroundings, but father knew better and after a few weeks at a farm house at Otterlo (the British were expected to cross the Rhine "any day now", but they did not) we climbed on our bicycles to go to Laren to the Koeslag family. No proper tires on the bicycles, and fully loaded with all we could carry, did not make the trip easy. When we arrived at Laren father Koeslag had been captured by the Germans and the sons were in hiding. So father decided to stay for some 10 days to help getting in the crop together with the younger children of the large Koeslag family. Then on to Coevorden. We did not quite make it in a day, but a friendly farmer in Dedemsvaart offered to let us spend the night. The Koeslags virtually all moved to Ontario, Canada, in 1948. The next day in Coevorden we were met by a welcoming committee, people who stopped us, offered us meals and beds, etc. It turned out that at that time many Dutch Nazis were fleeing the country. The commitee took us for such Nazis and they being nazis themselves wanted to help us. We stopped at the electricity/plumbing shop of Barteld and Mannie Menkveld (see above) who recognized the nazis and immediately offered to let us stay with him and, kind of, shooed the nazis away. Father and Barteld decided to work together after the war! Then our final leg of the trip. We got as far as Jipsingboertange and we were exhausted. There happened to be a tram full of workers conscripted to harvest potatoes and they offered us a ride to Winschoten. Then the last 8 kilometers and we arrived at my grandparents home, Geert Paap and Wobgien Smit, at the First Lane, Kromme Elleboog, Ekamp, municipality of Finsterwolde. Here we spent the "warwinter". It was not easy without electricity and many necesities of life, but we never went hungry, because of the contacts father managed to make with farmers all around. We were liberated by Canadian troops on April 15, 1945 but had to duck for the German artillery that was dug in at Termunten, on the coast of the Dollard. Father and mother went to Wageningen as soon as they could with a rented truck and they found our house badly damaged and most of our belongings stolen. People had volunteered to work for the Germans just to get access to all those empty homes, ready to be robbed. They sold what was left of the house and returned with whatever they had been able to salvage. Then we moved to Coevorden. Father and Menkveld became partners in the Electricity and Plumbing business, father taking care of the latter. It did not work out well between them, so in 1948 the business split, with father getting the plumbing part. He had to study hard to get the necessary diploma's, but he did it. In the Netherlands you cannot open a plumbing business, or any business, unless you have al sorts of papers and diploma's. Father did very well. In 1965, at 60 years of age, he decided to retire. They called him crazy because he could make a lot more money and work until he was, say, 65. His answer was "I don't know that I will ever see 65 and I want to enjoy my last years." He did and lived until 81 years of age.


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