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Sources
1. Title:   Public Member Trees
Author:   Ancestry.com
Publication:   Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:2006;
2. Title:   Social Security Death Index
Page:   Database online
Author:   Ancestry.com
Publication:   Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:2008;

Notes
a. Note:   e ? HAROLD O. ARNOLD - - Born on Aug. 15, 1920, Harold Ollis Arnold diedSept. 2, 2005, due to complications from a fall. Harold was born in South Dakota when his mother traveled from Bozemanto Milbank, S.D., to visit relatives. They returned when he was twoweeks old. He always joked that he got back as soon as he could. Otherthen that brief two week lapse, he was a lifelong resident of theGallatin Valley. His family lived in various places in Bozeman until they moved into ahouse on South Sixth. Starting when he was nine years old he soldpapers in front of the Baxter Hotel, making a penny a paper. He hadmany amusing stories about the early citizenry of Bozeman. Several other jobs included working at a local dairy where he helpedprocess milk, starting at 4 a.m., and then made deliveries at 6 a.m.He worked with his mother and sister at the local pea canningfacilities picking the peas and working in the factory. This was alldone at the ripe old ages of 11 to 15. Starting at age 15, Harold began driving Mrs. Phillips around town andon trips. One of the most memorable trips for him was when he droveher and a friend to Los Angeles and returned on the bus through LasVegas where he went to an all you could eat shrimp buffet. It was hisfirst taste of shrimp and he ate too much. The rest of the trip wasnot much fun! At 16 his driving career behind him he went to work for Mr. Phillipsat Phillips Bookstore and Sporting Goods sweeping floors and makingdeliveries. He liked this job so well that that he continued workingat Phillips for 69 years only leaving his post at the store to servein the military and for two years ago when health issues forced him tostay home. Through the years and the many changes of owners he worked his way upto manager. When the opportunity presented itself, Harold boughtshares of Phillips. In the early 1970s, he became sole owner of whatwas by then called Phillips Bookstore and Office Supply. His dry witand service to his customers made him memorable to the many peoplethat patronized the store over the years. He attended schools in Bozeman and was a member of the first class tograduate from the brand new Gallatin High School (now Wilson School)in May 1938. Harold served during World War II and was sworn into theNavy in August 1942. He attended Signalman School at Champaign, Ill.,and served on several different ships and carriers until January 1946. On May 29, 1953, he married Ruth Ellen Larson of Big Timber in Helena.During his life he participated in many local service organizations.He was especially active in the Methodist Church serving as thePresident of Gallatin Methodist Extension Society in 1968. The groupwas instrumental in sponsoring the Senior Social Center for its firstyear of operation. He also served as Associated Member of the SeniorCenter. His children and friends remember him for his sense of humor and as aloving father. He was always a business man, finding when he was ninethat his paper selling business did much better if he approached thesororities and fraternities on campus where each one of the studentswould buy a paper. Later, when he owned Phillips and new affordable calculators came out,he couldn't sell the old slide rulers; so he got a great deal on abunch of the slide rulers, waited five years and sold them as noveltyitems and made a profit on them. He loved to hold the customers'babies when they came in the store and always joked that it wasbecause it made it easier for them to write a check. As his children we remember the countless ways in which his humortouched our lives everyday. When asked about heaven he would say thathe didn't want to go to heaven because none of his friends orrelatives would be there. He liked to sing Mac Davis's song "It's hardto be humble when your perfect in every way." He approached life witha wit and attitude that we hope to emulate in our passage throughlife. We will sorely miss him. Harold was preceded in death by his mother, Vera Arnold; brother,Robert Arnold; sisters, Betty Arnold and Grace (Arnold) Barhaug. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Ruth; daughters: Diana Arnold,Carla (Rick) Radovich, Chris (Dan) Meade, and Jeanne Arnold, all ofBozeman; and son Paul Arnold of Las Vegas. He is also survived bygrandchildren: Katie McHenry; Kris, Shawn, Cole, Derrick, Dylan, andTysen Radovich; David and Jesse Meade; and Scott Arnold; and onegreat-grandson, Hayden Traver. He also leaves behind many other familymembers and valued friends. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Grace BibleChurch. A reception will follow at the church. In lieu of flowersplease make a contribution to your favorite charity or to the SeniorSocial Center, 807 N. Tracy, Bozeman, 59715. ____________________________________________ OBIT180 - - Harold Ollis Arnold, Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Bozeman, MT,September 04, 2005, page ? HAROLD O. ARNOLD - - Born on Aug. 15, 1920, Harold Ollis Arnold diedSept. 2, 2005, due to complications from a fall. Harold was born in South Dakota when his mother traveled from Bozemanto Milbank, S.D., to visit relatives. They returned when he was twoweeks old. He always joked that he got back as soon as he could. Otherthen that brief two week lapse, he was a lifelong resident of theGallatin Valley. His family lived in various places in Bozeman until they moved into ahouse on South Sixth. Starting when he was nine years old he soldpapers in front of the Baxter Hotel, making a penny a paper. He hadmany amusing stories about the early citizenry of Bozeman. Several other jobs included working at a local dairy where he helpedprocess milk, starting at 4 a.m., and then made deliveries at 6 a.m.He worked with his mother and sister at the local pea canningfacilities picking the peas and working in the factory. This was alldone at the ripe old ages of 11 to 15. Starting at age 15, Harold began driving Mrs. Phillips around town andon trips. One of the most memorable trips for him was when he droveher and a friend to Los Angeles and returned on the bus through LasVegas where he went to an all you could eat shrimp buffet. It was hisfirst taste of shrimp and he ate too much. The rest of the trip wasnot much fun! At 16 his driving career behind him he went to work for Mr. Phillipsat Phillips Bookstore and Sporting Goods sweeping floors and makingdeliveries. He liked this job so well that that he continued workingat Phillips for 69 years only leaving his post at the store to servein the military and for two years ago when health issues forced him tostay home. Through the years and the many changes of owners he worked his way upto manager. When the opportunity presented itself, Harold boughtshares of Phillips. In the early 1970s, he became sole owner of whatwas by then called Phillips Bookstore and Office Supply. His dry witand service to his customers made him memorable to the many peoplethat patronized the store over the years. He attended schools in Bozeman and was a member of the first class tograduate from the brand new Gallatin High School (now Wilson School)in May 1938. Harold served during World War II and was sworn into theNavy in August 1942. He attended Signalman School at Champaign, Ill.,and served on several different ships and carriers until January 1946. On May 29, 1953, he married Ruth Ellen Larson of Big Timber in Helena.During his life he participated in many local service organizations.He was especially active in the Methodist Church serving as thePresident of Gallatin Methodist Extension Society in 1968. The groupwas instrumental in sponsoring the Senior Social Center for its firstyear of operation. He also served as Associated Member of the SeniorCenter. His children and friends remember him for his sense of humor and as aloving father. He was always a business man, finding when he was ninethat his paper selling business did much better if he approached thesororities and fraternities on campus where each one of the studentswould buy a paper. Later, when he owned Phillips and new affordable calculators came out,he couldn't sell the old slide rulers; so he got a great deal on abunch of the slide rulers, waited five years and sold them as noveltyitems and made a profit on them. He loved to hold the customers'babies when they came in the store and always joked that it wasbecause it made it easier for them to write a check. As his children we remember the countless ways in which his humortouched our lives everyday. When asked about heaven he would say thathe didn't want to go to heaven because none of his friends orrelatives would be there. He liked to sing Mac Davis's song "It's hardto be humble when your perfect in every way." He approached life witha wit and attitude that we hope to emulate in our passage throughlife. We will sorely miss him. Harold was preceded in death by his mother, Vera Arnold; brother,Robert Arnold; sisters, Betty Arnold and Grace (Arnold) Barhaug. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Ruth; daughters: Diana Arnold,Carla (Rick) Radovich, Chris (Dan) Meade, and Jeanne Arnold, all ofBozeman; and son Paul Arnold of Las Vegas. He is also survived bygrandchildren: Katie McHenry; Kris, Shawn, Cole, Derrick, Dylan, andTysen Radovich; David and Jesse Meade; and Scott Arnold; and onegreat-grandson, Hayden Traver. He also leaves behind many other familymembers and valued friends. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Grace BibleChurch. A reception will follow at the church. In lieu of flowersplease make a contribution to your favorite charity or to the SeniorSocial Center, 807 N. Tracy, Bozeman, 59715. ____________________________________________
Note:   OBIT180 - - Harold Ollis Arnold, Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Bozeman, MT,September 04, 2005, pag


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