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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Mary Imogene Cook: Birth: 4 AUG 1877 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York. Death: 1 JUL 1953 in Montclair, Essex, New Jersey


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Maria Louise Cook: Birth: 28 DEC 1881 in Montclair, Essex, New Jersey. Death: 9 JAN 1958 in St Petersburg, Florida

  2. Helen Dodd Cook: Birth: 15 AUG 1883 in Montclair, Essex, New Jersey. Death: 19 DEC 1954 in St Petersburg, Florida

  3. Joseph Alexander COOK: Birth: 11 JAN 1888 in Montclair, Essex, New Jersey. Death: 23 JAN 1972 in Red Bank, New Jersey


Sources
1. Source:   S128
2. Source:   S129
3. Text:   Cook Family Bibles Prospect Hill Cem, Caldwell, New Jersey Footnote: Prospect Hill Cem, Caldwell, New Jersey
Source:   S130

Notes
a. Note:   N6 Cyrus Alexander Cook, called Aleck, (1845-1926) grew up on his family’s farm in Caldwell, New Jersey, however, he chose not to be a farmer, and went to work in New York City, as had several of his father's sisters, where he met and married Mary Imogene Peck (1844-1877). They lived in Brooklyn; when daughter Mary Imogene Cook (Aunt Ginny) was born, her mother died. Mary Imogene Peck Cook’s funeral was delayed because her baby seemed so frail it was thought to bury them together. However, due to the loving care of her nurse, Mrs. Brown, baby Imogene (Ginny) survived and thrived. I have an antique wax head baby doll with glass eyes which Mrs. Brown gave to Aunt Ginny when she was a baby. The doll was probably made in Germany about 1840. Aleck brought the baby home to his sisters in New Jersey to care for, and three years later he married Louise Whitehead Crane (1848-1902) who was the sister of Henry Duryea Crane who had married Aleck’s sister Abby Lurana Cook. Aleck and Louise lived in Montclair, New Jersey. Aleck Cook worked for the White Steamship Company and then the A. H. Bull Steamship Company for many years, commuting from Montclair into New York City daily. He was also Secretary of the Montclair Building and Loan Association for 35 years. Betty Cook Hill, Aleck’s granddaughter remembered hearing that in later years Aleck frequently traveled to the Caribbean both on business for the steamship company and for pleasure. His granddaughter, Peggy Cook, as a small child, was chosen to christen one of the A H Bull Company’s new steamships at an official ceremony in New York City. The given name Cyrus probably comes from the brother of his mother Phebe Harrison, Cyrus Harrison (1794-1873.) Louise and Aleck Cook's three daughters all graduated from college: Imogene in 1900, Helen in 1906 from Wellesley College, and Louise in 1907 from Oberlin College. Their son Aleck graduated from Princeton in 1909. They must have been quite exceptional parents to provide college educations for three daughters as well as their son in days when very few people even finished high school. Perhaps they were especially encouraged to educate their daughters because Aleck's sister Anna Cook (1836-1919) was a teacher and had graduated from Trenton Normal School, and his aunt Helen Cook (1810-1866) had her medical degree. From Family History Stories January 2017 Bonnie L Hamilton ____________________ notes from Anna Cook C A Cook Testimonial Montclair Savings Bank Dec 22 1926 Secretary Montclair Building and Loan 36 years which he helped organize in 1888 Clerk NY Savings bank Secretary A H Bull Steamship Company 36 years _____________________ The name Cyrus probably comes from the brother of his mother Phebe Harrison, Cyrus Harrison 1794-1873. Louise and C. Alex both grew up on working farms in Caldwell, New Jersey. C Alex, however, chose not to be a farmer, and went to work in New York City, as had several of his father's sisters. He worked for the White Steamship Company, and then the A H Bull Steamship Company; later he was also Secretary of the Montclair Building and Loan Association. In New York he met and married Imogene Peck; they lived in Brooklyn. When their daughter Mary Imogene was born, Imogene died. C Alex brought the baby home to his sisters in New Jersey, and three years later he married Louise Crane and moved to Montclair, where he could commute to New York City by train. C. Alexander Cook is listed as one of the Managers of the Montclair Savings Bank in the Montclair Annual, Who’s Who in Montclair 1916 p. 45 C A Cook worked for the A H Bull Steamship company for many years, commuting from Montclair into New York City daily. A. H. Bull & Company, New York (1902-1963) / Baltimore Insular Line Inc. Archibald H. Bull was the founder of the British-flagged New York and Porto Rico Steamship Co. in 1885, which succeeded an earlier line of sailing packets on the same route that he had established in 1873. In 1900, his stake in the company was bought out by his partners in a hostile takeover, and Bull was forced to give up running steamers to Puerto Rico for 10 years. In 1902 he set up the Bull Line to serve the US Atlantic coastwise trade and operate sailing vessels to Puerto Rico and by 1917 when the United States entered the war, fifteen ships had been acquired or built for the fleet.
 In 1914, A. H. Bull bought the Insular Line, which had been established in 1904 as a successor to his old company, and renamed it the Baltimore Insular Line. 
 After the Armistice, services were inaugurated to the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea and to the Azores, Canary Islands and West Africa. These were abandoned in 1924 and a new service inaugurated to South and East Africa, but again, in 1927 the service was ended and the fleet concentrated on the Atlantic coastal service and sailings to the West Indies. In 1923 A.H. Bull commenced a passenger service with the introduction of the CATHERINE sailing on overnight trips between San Juan and St. Thomas. This service was supplemented in 1930 by the BARBARA on the Baltimore San Juan route.
 The Second World War disrupted all passenger services and the BARBARA was lost and although the CATHERINE survived the war she was immediately sold to British buyers. http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/bull.shtml A H Bull Steamship Co, New York, New York (1902-1963) House Flags of Shipping Companies House flags, also known as company flags or private signals, indicate the owner or operator of a merchant vessel. Before the days of radio, the sighting of the house flag at the foremast of a vessel arriving near a port would enable the owners to be notified so they could make immediate arrangements to unload the cargo and passengers and so on. The practice of using house flags seems to have originated in Liverpool around the end of the 18th century and quickly spread throughout the world. It is not possible to illustrate all the thousands of flags that have been used by U.S. shipping companies over the years, so the following is merely a selection of those of especially notable companies to illustrate the range of designs used. The flags of U.S. shipping companies most often consist of the company initial or initials on the center of a geometrical figure, such as a diamond or circle. Red, white, and blue are the colors most frequently used. One interesting aspect of these flags is the way one can sometimes trace the history of a line and its organizational genealogy through the changes in its flags. The Log of Mystic Seaport volume 45, issue 1, page 7 A H Bull Steamship CO, New York, New York (1902-1963) Carolyn-a steel-hulled, single-screw steamer-was laid down on 15 March 1912 at Newport News, Virginia., by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., for the A. H. Bull Steamship Lines; launched on 3 July 1912; sponsored by Miss Carolyn Bull (for whom the ship was probably named), a granddaughter of the shipping line's owner, Archibald Hilton Bull (1847-1920); and delivered on 20 July 1912. http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/steamers/atik.htm Carolyn (2) 1912 built by Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company, Newport News | 1942 to US Navy renamed Atik used as a Q ship, 26th March 1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.123. 1850 United States Federal Census Livingston, Essex, New Jersey Name: Cyrus A Cook Age: 5 Estimated birth year: abt 1845 Birth Place: New Jersey Family Number: 165 Household Members: Name Age Joseph Cook 44 Phebe Cook 42 Hannah M Cook 13 Zuas F Cook (Zenas) 11 Abby L Cook 8 Cyrus A Cook 5 Joseph H Cook 1 Phebe Harrison 77 1900 Federal Census 100 Park St, Montclair, New Jersey Cook C. Alexander Cook bookkeeper steamship company Louise W(hitehead) Maria L(ouise) Helen D(odd) Joseph A(lexander) Mary I(mogne Aunt Ginny) Wheeler Julius P Samuel C Mary L Howard D Charlotte R Edgar C Cook listed as “boarders” William H Marian A Henry A Helen M 1910 Federal Census Montclair, New Jersey C. Alexander Cook 65 Ship Broker Mary I (Imogene) 32 (Aunt Ginny) Teacher Louise 28 Helen D (Dodd) 26 Teacher Joseph A (Alexander) 22 Mary L Wheeler 32 niece Teacher Ruth Wheeler 24 niece Edgar C Wheeler 21 nephew Mary Walsh 31 servant _____________________________ Cyrus Alexander Cook*^ went to work in New York City where he met and married Mary Imogene Peck. They lived in Brooklyn; when their daughter Mary Imogene*^ (Aunt Ginny) was born, Imogene died. Imogene Peck Cook's funeral was delayed because her baby seemed so frail it was thought to bury them together. However, due to the loving care of her nurse, Mrs. Brown, baby Imogene (Ginny) survived. Aunt Ginny graduated from Wellesley College in 1900 and was a spinster schoolteacher. For many years she lived at 100 Park St. with her father C. Alex and her brother Alec and his wife Marion Engle Cook, and helped raise their daughters. C. Alex Cook worked for the White Steamship Company and the A H Bull Steamship Company of New York City, and was Secretary of the Montclair Building and Loan Association for 35 years. Betty Cook Hill remembers hearing that in later years C. Alex frequently traveled to the Caribbean both on business for the steamship company and for pleasure. His granddaughter, Peggy Cook, as a small child, was chosen to christen one of the A H Bull Company new steamships at an official ceremony in New York City. When C. Alex married Louise Whitehead Crane*, they bought the house at 100 Park St, Montclair. In addition to daughter Imogene, they had three children: Maria Louise (Aunt Louise) married William Everett Raymond; Helen Dodd (Aunt Helen) married Harold Vincent; and Joseph Alexander married Marion Fenimore Engle. Louise and Helen graduated from Wellesley College in 1905 and 1907 respectively, and Alec graduated from Princeton University in 1909, majoring in Greek. (This was not a particularly useful specialty.) C. Alex and Louise Crane Cook must have been very exceptional parents to send three daughters and a son to college in days when very few people even finished high school. Perhaps they were especially encouraged to educate their daughters because C. Alex's sister Anna^ graduated from Trenton Normal School (Teachers college), and his aunt Helen had attended Oberlin College for nine years. Helen /Eleanor/Ellen (she is referred to by all three names in family papers) Cook Barker (1810-1866) became a doctor and practiced medicine in New York City along with her husband Dr. A. Barker. (Family papers don't give his first name and neither does his tombstone, but I hope to find out that his name was Alexander and speculate that Cyrus Alexander Cook was named for him. Of course that theory may be all wrong if he turns out to be Alfred or Arthur.) When Louise Crane Cook's twin sister, Maria Crane Wheeler, died in 1892 her children came to live with the Cook children. These were the Wheeler cousins, Howard, Edgar, Ruth, and Louise, (Aunt Louie who was a missionary in India for many years). In 1899 C. Alex had the original 100 Park St. house* moved back on the lot, and added a second house to the front, making a spacious home* where there was room for the extended family. Including, of course, the many pets who shared house space over the years: dogs and puppies, cats and kittens, white mice, chameleons, gold fish, and Marion's canaries. When courting, one of the first things Alec and Marion discovered they had in common was a love of cats. The house was always expandable, whether for the many family gatherings, or for unexpected guests for holidays. Several generations have memories centered on that house: the race with the birds to pick the bing cherries, then sitting on the back porch to pit them for making jam, pies, etc., always on the hottest days of summer; arguments between Aunt Ginny and Marion over what colors to choose for new porch cushions; putting the pot of water on to boil before Grandpa (C. Alex) went to pick the sweet corn growing out back; the music room with the big piano; the conservatory with the little brass toys Aunt Louie brought from India; the roses in the back yard that bloomed just in time for the garden wedding of Marion Louise and Betty; Aunt Ginny as an old lady in a big chair by the fireplace, making scrapbooks to entertain visiting children; the big kitchen with a second set of stairs behind a door, and Aunt Ginny offering refreshments: grape juice and ginger ale, mixed half and half, to drink with cinnamon toast. The house was sold when Aunt Ginny died in 1953 and is now used as doctors' offices and apartments. In 1994* it is very well cared for, but without its front porch it looks quite different from the big house we remember. Obituary The Montclair Times December 24, 1926 C. Alexander Cook, eighty-one years old, of 100 Park Street died suddenly of a heart attack at his home on Wednesday evening. Mr. Cook was particularly interested in local public affairs, and was one of the veteran residents of the town. Hw was born in Caldwell and had lived in Montclair for about forty-five years. He had been a life-long resident in this section (of New Jersey). Mr. Cook recently submitted his resignation as secretary of the Montclair Building and Loan Association which position he had held since the organization of the association about thirty-five years ago. About ten years ago Mr Cook left the employ of the A H Bull Steamship Company of New York City, where he had served as secretary for a number of years. He was a member of the Central Presbyterian church and of the Rotary Club and was a member of the old Montclair Club when it existed on Church Street. Surviving Mr Cook are three daughters, Imogene Cook and Mrs Harold Vincent, both of Montclair, and Mrs Everett Raymond of Kingston and an son J Alexander Cook. Funeral services for Mr Cook will be conducted at his home this afternoon at 3 o’clock by Rev Edmund Melville Wylie, pastor of the Central Presbyterian church, assisted by Rev Vincent. Mr Cook’s son-in-law. In tournament will be in Caldwell cemetery.
b. Note:   heart failure


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