Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William Flanders: Birth: Aft 1249 in Flanders. Death: 1311

  2. Robert III Of Flanders: Birth: Abt 1249 in Artois, Pas-DE-Calais, Nord-Pas-DE-Calais, France. Death: 17 Sep 1322 in Ypern

  3. Baldwin De Dampierre: Birth: 1252. Death: 1296

  4. Beatrix De Dampierre-Sur-L'aube: Birth: 1254 in Dampierre, Jura, Franche-Comte, France. Death: 23 Mar 1296 in Gravenhage, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

  5. Philip De Dampierre: Birth: Abt 1263. Death: Nov 1318

  6. Marguerite De Dampierre: Birth: Bet 1253 and 1255. Death: 3 Jul 1285

  7. Marie De Dampierre: Death: 1297

  8. Wilhelm IV Landless Sire Of Dendermonde: Death: 1311


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Marguerite Flanders: Birth: Abt 1262. Death: 1331

  2. John I Of Dampierre, Count Of Namur: Birth: 1267. Death: 1 Feb 1331

  3. Beatirx De Dampierre: Birth: Abt 1268. Death: 1307

  4. Philippa De Dampierre: Birth: Abt 1280. Death: 1306 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France

  5. Beatrice De Dampierre: Birth: 1280. Death: 1307

  6. Isabel (Lady Of Tingry) De Dampierre: Birth: Abt 1281 in Flanders. Death: 1323

  7. Henry De Dampierre: Death: 6 Nov 1337

  8. Jeanne De Dampierre: Death: 1296

  9. Guy Namur: Death: 1311

  10. Beatrix Of Flanders: Death: Aft 1307

  11. Margaret Of Flanders: Death: 1331


Sources
1. Title:   Wikipedia

Notes
a. Note:   Guy of Dampierre (Dutch: Gwijde van Dampierre) (c. 1226 ? March 7, 1304, Compi�egne) was the count of Flanders during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. His coat-of-arms was "Or, a lion rampant sable". In June 1246 he married Matilda of Bethune (d. November 8, 1264), daughter of Robert VII, Lord of Bethune. In March 1265 he married Isabelle of Luxembourg (d. September 1298), daughter of Henry II, Count of Luxembourg. Guy was the second son of Guy II of Dampierre and Margaret II of Flanders. The death of his elder brother William in a tournament made him joint Count of Flanders with his mother. (She had made William co-ruler of Flanders 1246 to ensure that it would go to the Dampierre children of her second marriage, rather than the Avesnes children of her first.) Guy and his mother struggled against the Avesnes (led by John I, Count of Hainaut), but were defeated in 1253 at the Battle of Walcheren, and Guy was taken prisoner. By the mediation of Louis IX of France, he was ransomed in 1256. Some respite was obtained by the death of John of Hainaut in 1257. In 1270, Margaret confiscated the property of English merchants in Flanders; this led to a devastating trade war with England, which supplied most of the wool for the Flemish weavers. Even after her abdication in 1278, Guy often found himself in difficulties with the fractious commoners. In 1288, complaints over taxes led Philip IV of France to tighten his control over Flanders. Tension built between Guy and the king; in 1294, Guy arranged a marriage between his daughter Philippa and Edward, Prince of Wales. However, Philip imprisoned Guy and two of his sons, forced him to call off the marriage, and imprisoned Philippa in Paris until her death in 1306. Guy was summoned before the king again in 1296, and the principal cities of Flanders were taken under royal protection until Guy paid an idemnity and surrendered his territories, to hold them at the grace of the king. After these indignities, Guy attempted to revenge himself on Philip by an alliance with Edward I of England in 1297, to which Philip responded by declaring Flanders annexed to the royal domain. The French under Robert II of Artois defeated the Flemings at the Battle of Furnes, and Edward's expedition into Flanders was abortive. He made peace with Philip in 1298 and left Guy to his fate. The French invaded again in 1299 and captured both Guy and his son Robert in January 1300. The Flemish burghers, however, found direct French rule to be more oppressive than that of the count. After smashing a French army at the Battle of Courtrai in 1302, Guy was briefly released by the French to try to negotiate terms. His subjects, however, refused to compromise; and a new French offensive in 1304 destroyed a Flemish fleet at the Battle of Zierikzee and fought the Flemings to a draw at the Battle of Mons-en-P�ev�ele. Guy was returned to prison, where he died. (Wikipedia) Guy of Dampierre-From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Guy of Flanders) Guy of Dampierre (Dutch: Gwijde van Dampierre) (c. 1226 ? March 7, 1304, Compi�egne) was the count of Flanders during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. His coat-of-arms was "Or, a lion rampant sable". Guy was the second son of William II of Dampierre and Margaret II of Flanders. The death of his elder brother William in a tournament made him joint Count of Flanders with his mother. (She had made William co-ruler of Flanders 1246 to ensure that it would go to the Dampierre children of her second marriage, rather than the Avesnes children of her first.) Guy and his mother struggled against the Avesnes (led by John I, Count of Hainaut) in the War of the Succession of Flanders and Hainault, but were defeated in 1253 at the Battle of Walcheren, and Guy was taken prisoner. By the mediation of Louis IX of France, he was ransomed in 1256. Some respite was obtained by the death of John of Hainaut in 1257. In 1270, Margaret confiscated the property of English merchants in Flanders; this led to a devastating trade war with England, which supplied most of the wool for the Flemish weavers. Even after her abdication in 1278, Guy often found himself in difficulties with the fractious commoners. In 1288, complaints over taxes led Philip IV of France to tighten his control over Flanders. Tension built between Guy and the king; in 1294, Guy arranged a marriage between his daughter Philippa and Edward, Prince of Wales. However, Philip imprisoned Guy and two of his sons, forced him to call off the marriage, and imprisoned Philippa in Paris until her death in 1306. Guy was summoned before the king again in 1296, and the principal cities of Flanders were taken under royal protection until Guy paid an idemnity and surrendered his territories, to hold them at the grace of the king. After these indignities, Guy attempted to revenge himself on Philip by an alliance with Edward I of England in 1297, to which Philip responded by declaring Flanders annexed to the royal domain. The French under Robert II of Artois defeated the Flemings at the Battle of Furnes, and Edward's expedition into Flanders was abortive. He made peace with Philip in 1298 and left Guy to his fate. The French invaded again in 1299 and captured both Guy and his son Robert in January 1300. The Flemish burghers, however, found direct French rule to be more oppressive than that of the count. After smashing a French army at the Battle of Courtrai in 1302, Guy was briefly released by the French to try to negotiate terms. His subjects, however, refused to compromise; and a new French offensive in 1304 destroyed a Flemish fleet at the Battle of Zierikzee and fought the Flemings to a draw at the Battle of Mons-en-P�ev�ele. Guy was returned to prison, where he died. [edit] Family and Children In June 1246 he married Matilda of Bethune (d. November 8, 1264), daughter of Robert VII, Lord of Bethune, and had the following children: Marie (d. 1297), married William of J�ulich (d. 1278), married in 1285 Simon II de Chateauvillain (d. 1305), Lord of Bremur Robert III of Flanders (1249?1322) William (aft. 1249 ? 1311), Lord of Dendermonde and Crevecouer, married in 1286 Alix of Beaumont and had issue John (1250 ? October 4, 1290), Bishop of Metz and Li�ege Baldwin (1252?1296) Margaret (c. 1253 ? July 3, 1285), married in 1273 John I, Duke of Brabant Beatrix (c. 1260 ? April 5, 1291), married c. 1270 Floris V, Count of Holland Philip (c. 1263 ? November 1318), Count of Teano, married Mahaut de Courtenay, Countess of Chieti (d. 1303), married c. 1304 Philipotte of Milly (d. c. 1335), no issue In March 1265 he married Isabelle of Luxembourg (d. September 1298), daughter of Henry V of Luxembourg, and had the following children: Beatrix (d. 1307), married c. 1287 Hugh II of Ch�atillon Margaret (d. 1331), married on November 14, 1282 at Roxburgh Alexander of Scotland (son of Alexander III of Scotland), married on July 3, 1286 in Namur Reinoud I, Duke of Guelders Isabelle (d. 1323), married 1307 Jean de Fiennes, Lord of Tingry and Chatelain of Bourbourg Philippa (d. 1306, Paris) John I, Marquis of Namur (1267?1330) Guy of Namur (d. 1311), Lord of Ronse, sometime Count of Zeeland Henry (d. November 6, 1337), Count of Lodi, married January 1309 Margaret of Cleves and had issue Jeanne (d. 1296), a nun at Flines ====================================================== Died a prisoner of the French ====================================================== Arranged an open alliance with England. As a result, King Philippe IV of France invaded Flanders & imprisoned Guy in Paris. He spent most of the rest of his life imprisoned. 8 Event: Accedence 1278 Note: Acceded as the Count of Flanders 6 7 Birth: ABT 1226 7 Event: Note 06 JUN 1251 Note: On June 6, 1251, his elder full brother Guillaume de Dampierre was assassinated and it was shown that Guillaume and Gui's elder half brothers Jan and Baudouin d'Avesnes financed the crime. 6 Event: Note 04 JUL 1253 Note: On July 4, 1253 Jan d'Avesnes (Gui's elder half brother) defeated the armies of his mother Margarethe and of Gui, at the battle of West-Capelle. Gui was imprisoned and Margarethe agreed to sell her rights to Hainault to Charles I Etienne, brother of Louis IX, if he would reconquer it from Jan. Jan's brother-in-law Willem II, Count of Holland, the Emperor-Elect, was convinced to grant Hainault (an imperial fief) and those Flemish lands within the Empire to Jan. Charles was defeated and King Louis, returning from the Seventh Crusade, ordered his brother to abide by his arbitration of 1246. 6 Event: Note 22 NOV 1257 Note: On November 22, 1257, Gui de Dampierre finally relinquished Hainault to his elder half brother Jan d'Avesnes, but Jan died on Christmas Eve 1257 in Valenciennes. He was succeeded by his son Jan II. 6 (source: RootsWeb: labron0) Guy of Dampierre (Dutch: Gwijde van Dampierre) (c. 1226 ? March 7, 1304, Compi�egne) was the count of Flanders during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. His coat-of-arms was "Or, a lion rampant sable". In June 1246 he married Matilda of Bethune (d. November 8, 1264), daughter of Robert VII, Lord of Bethune. In March 1265 he married Isabelle of Luxembourg (d. September 1298), daughter of Henry II, Count of Luxembourg. Guy was the second son of Guy II of Dampierre and Margaret II of Flanders. The death of his elder brother William in a tournament made him joint Count of Flanders with his mother. (She had made William co-ruler of Flanders 1246 to ensure that it would go to the Dampierre children of her second marriage, rather than the Avesnes children of her first.) Guy and his mother struggled against the Avesnes (led by John I, Count of Hainaut), but were defeated in 1253 at the Battle of Walcheren, and Guy was taken prisoner. By the mediation of Louis IX of France, he was ransomed in 1256. Some respite was obtained by the death of John of Hainaut in 1257. In 1270, Margaret confiscated the property of English merchants in Flanders; this led to a devastating trade war with England, which supplied most of the wool for the Flemish weavers. Even after her abdication in 1278, Guy often found himself in difficulties with the fractious commoners. In 1288, complaints over taxes led Philip IV of France to tighten his control over Flanders. Tension built between Guy and the king; in 1294, Guy arranged a marriage between his daughter Philippa and Edward, Prince of Wales. However, Philip imprisoned Guy and two of his sons, forced him to call off the marriage, and imprisoned Philippa in Paris until her death in 1306. Guy was summoned before the king again in 1296, and the principal cities of Flanders were taken under royal protection until Guy paid an idemnity and surrendered his territories, to hold them at the grace of the king. After these indignities, Guy attempted to revenge himself on Philip by an alliance with Edward I of England in 1297, to which Philip responded by declaring Flanders annexed to the royal domain. The French under Robert II of Artois defeated the Flemings at the Battle of Furnes, and Edward's expedition into Flanders was abortive. He made peace with Philip in 1298 and left Guy to his fate. The French invaded again in 1299 and captured both Guy and his son Robert in January 1300. The Flemish burghers, however, found direct French rule to be more oppressive than that of the count. After smashing a French army at the Battle of Courtrai in 1302, Guy was briefly released by the French to try to negotiate terms. His subjects, however, refused to compromise; and a new French offensive in 1304 destroyed a Flemish fleet at the Battle of Zierikzee and fought the Flemings to a draw at the Battle of Mons-en-P�ev�ele. Guy was returned to prison, where he died. (Wikipedia) Guy of Dampierre-From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Guy of Flanders) Guy of Dampierre (Dutch: Gwijde van Dampierre) (c. 1226 ? March 7, 1304, Compi�egne) was the count of Flanders during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. His coat-of-arms was "Or, a lion rampant sable". Guy was the second son of William II of Dampierre and Margaret II of Flanders. The death of his elder brother William in a tournament made him joint Count of Flanders with his mother. (She had made William co-ruler of Flanders 1246 to ensure that it would go to the Dampierre children of her second marriage, rather than the Avesnes children of her first.) Guy and his mother struggled against the Avesnes (led by John I, Count of Hainaut) in the War of the Succession of Flanders and Hainault, but were defeated in 1253 at the Battle of Walcheren, and Guy was taken prisoner. By the mediation of Louis IX of France, he was ransomed in 1256. Some respite was obtained by the death of John of Hainaut in 1257. In 1270, Margaret confiscated the property of English merchants in Flanders; this led to a devastating trade war with England, which supplied most of the wool for the Flemish weavers. Even after her abdication in 1278, Guy often found himself in difficulties with the fractious commoners. In 1288, complaints over taxes led Philip IV of France to tighten his control over Flanders. Tension built between Guy and the king; in 1294, Guy arranged a marriage between his daughter Philippa and Edward, Prince of Wales. However, Philip imprisoned Guy and two of his sons, forced him to call off the marriage, and imprisoned Philippa in Paris until her death in 1306. Guy was summoned before the king again in 1296, and the principal cities of Flanders were taken under royal protection until Guy paid an idemnity and surrendered his territories, to hold them at the grace of the king. After these indignities, Guy attempted to revenge himself on Philip by an alliance with Edward I of England in 1297, to which Philip responded by declaring Flanders annexed to the royal domain. The French under Robert II of Artois defeated the Flemings at the Battle of Furnes, and Edward's expedition into Flanders was abortive. He made peace with Philip in 1298 and left Guy to his fate. The French invaded again in 1299 and captured both Guy and his son Robert in January 1300. The Flemish burghers, however, found direct French rule to be more oppressive than that of the count. After smashing a French army at the Battle of Courtrai in 1302, Guy was briefly released by the French to try to negotiate terms. His subjects, however, refused to compromise; and a new French offensive in 1304 destroyed a Flemish fleet at the Battle of Zierikzee and fought the Flemings to a draw at the Battle of Mons-en-P�ev�ele. Guy was returned to prison, where he died. [edit] Family and Children In June 1246 he married Matilda of Bethune (d. November 8, 1264), daughter of Robert VII, Lord of Bethune, and had the following children: Marie (d. 1297), married William of J�ulich (d. 1278), married in 1285 Simon II de Chateauvillain (d. 1305), Lord of Bremur Robert III of Flanders (1249?1322) William (aft. 1249 ? 1311), Lord of Dendermonde and Crevecouer, married in 1286 Alix of Beaumont and had issue John (1250 ? October 4, 1290), Bishop of Metz and Li�ege Baldwin (1252?1296) Margaret (c. 1253 ? July 3, 1285), married in 1273 John I, Duke of Brabant Beatrix (c. 1260 ? April 5, 1291), married c. 1270 Floris V, Count of Holland Philip (c. 1263 ? November 1318), Count of Teano, married Mahaut de Courtenay, Countess of Chieti (d. 1303), married c. 1304 Philipotte of Milly (d. c. 1335), no issue In March 1265 he married Isabelle of Luxembourg (d. September 1298), daughter of Henry V of Luxembourg, and had the following children: Beatrix (d. 1307), married c. 1287 Hugh II of Ch�atillon Margaret (d. 1331), married on November 14, 1282 at Roxburgh Alexander of Scotland (son of Alexander III of Scotland), married on July 3, 1286 in Namur Reinoud I, Duke of Guelders Isabelle (d. 1323), married 1307 Jean de Fiennes, Lord of Tingry and Chatelain of Bourbourg Philippa (d. 1306, Paris) John I, Marquis of Namur (1267?1330) Guy of Namur (d. 1311), Lord of Ronse, sometime Count of Zeeland Henry (d. November 6, 1337), Count of Lodi, married January 1309 Margaret of Cleves and had issue Jeanne (d. 1296), a nun at Flines ====================================================== Died a prisoner of the French ====================================================== Arranged an open alliance with England. As a result, King Philippe IV of France invaded Flanders & imprisoned Guy in Paris. He spent most of the rest of his life imprisoned. 8 Event: Accedence 1278 Note: Acceded as the Count of Flanders 6 7 Birth: ABT 1226 7 Event: Note 06 JUN 1251 Note: On June 6, 1251, his elder full brother Guillaume de Dampierre was assassinated and it was shown that Guillaume and Gui's elder half brothers Jan and Baudouin d'Avesnes financed the crime. 6 Event: Note 04 JUL 1253 Note: On July 4, 1253 Jan d'Avesnes (Gui's elder half brother) defeated the armies of his mother Margarethe and of Gui, at the battle of West-Capelle. Gui was imprisoned and Margarethe agreed to sell her rights to Hainault to Charles I Etienne, brother of Louis IX, if he would reconquer it from Jan. Jan's brother-in-law Willem II, Count of Holland, the Emperor-Elect, was convinced to grant Hainault (an imperial fief) and those Flemish lands within the Empire to Jan. Charles was defeated and King Louis, returning from the Seventh Crusade, ordered his brother to abide by his arbitration of 1246. 6 Event: Note 22 NOV 1257 Note: On November 22, 1257, Gui de Dampierre finally relinquished Hainault to his elder half brother Jan d'Avesnes, but Jan died on Christmas Eve 1257 in Valenciennes. He was succeeded by his son Jan II. 6 (source: RootsWeb: labron0) BIBLIOGRAPHY: Paget, Gerald, The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince ofWales. London: Charles Skilton Ltd, 1977. Nypl ARF+ 78-835. Previte-Orton, C. W., The Shorter Cambridge Medieval History, Cambridge:University Press, 1952. Chatham 940.1PRE. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichteder europaischen Staaten, New Series. I: Die Stammesherzoge, DieWeltlichenkurforsten, Die Kaiserlichen, Koniglichen und GrossherzoglichenFamilien. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1980. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichteder europaischen Staaten, New Series. II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten DieRegierenden Hauser der Ubrigen Staaten Europas. Marburg: Verlag von J. A.Stargardt, 1984. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichteder europaischen Staaten, New Series. VI: Familien des Alten Lotharingien I.Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1978. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichteder europaischen Staaten, New Series. VII: Familien des Alten Lotharingien II.Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1979. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichteder europaischen Staaten, New Series. XVIII: Zwischen Maas und Rhein.Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998. Tapsell, R. F., Monarchs, Rulers, Dynasties and Kingdoms of the World. NewYork: Facts on File Publications, 1983. Watney, Vernon James, The Wallop Family and their Ancestry, Oxford:JohnJohnson, 1928. LDS Film#1696491 items 6-9. van de Pas, Leo, Stephen de Blois. Posting to soc.genealogy.medieval (emaillist GEN-MEDIEVAL) on 12/31/1998-025515. Subject: Stephen de Blois - ONE.Available at http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/1998-12/0915101715,http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/1998-12/0915105338,http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/1998-12/0915111633, andhttp://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/1998-12/0915127331. Author address:leovdpas at iinet dot net dot au. RESEARCH NOTES: Count of Flanders [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p76] Sources for this Information: date: 1225/26 [Ref: ES II #8] died 1305 aged 80 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #408],parents: [Ref: CMH p1034, Watney WALLOP #408] Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES VII #57] 1304 [Ref: CMH p1034] 1305 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #408]7.III 1305 [Ref: ES II #8], place: (im Gefangenschaft) Compiegne [Ref: ES II#8]
b. Note:   BI65725
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: 1225/26 [Ref: ES II #8] died 1305 aged 80 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #408], parents: [Ref: CMH p1034, Watney WALLOP #408]
c. Note:   DI65725
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES VII #57] 1304 [Ref: CMH p1034] 1305 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #408] 7.III 1305 [Ref: ES II #8], place: (im Gefangenschaft) Compiegne [Ref: ES II #8]
d. Note:   NF30286
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: (2.II 1246) [Ref: ES II #8, ES VII #57], child: [Ref: ES II #2, ES II #8, Leo van de Pas SGM 12/31/1998-025515, Watney WALLOP #408]
e. Note:   NF30333
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES II #8], child: [Ref: ES II #8, Leo van de Pas SGM 12/31/1998-025515, Paget HRHCharles p157]


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