Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Theodechildis : Birth: 492. Death: 567


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Theuderic I Of Metz: Birth: 486 in Reims, Marne, Champagne, France. Death: 534 in Metz, Austrasia


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Ingomir (Prince Of The Franks) : Birth: 493 in Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France. Death: 493 in Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France

  2. Chlodomir (King Of Orleans - 511-524) King Of Orleans: Birth: 495 in Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France. Death: 21 Jun 524 in Burgundy, France

  3. Childebert I (King Of Paris 511-558) King Of Paris: Birth: 496 in Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France. Death: 23 Dec 558

  4. Clothaire I King Of Soissons: Birth: 497 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, Franconie. Death: 10 Nov 561 in Braines, Loire-Atlantique, Franconie

  5. Clotilda Of The Visigoths: Birth: 497 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Alantique, France. Death: 7 Jun 531 in En Route To Paris

  6. Oueteria Of France: Birth: 504 in Moselle, Lorraine, France.

  7. Ferreolus DE Vitre-en-Perthois: Birth: Abt 505 in Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Preussen. Death: 532


Notes
a. Note:   Born circa 466, son of Childeric I, King des Francs and Basine Andovera de Turinge , Clovis I became King between the Summer of 481 and Autumn of 482. According to Gregoire de Tours, he was only about 15 years of age at the time. In any case he was quite young as he was called "juvenis". Timelines here are bound to be fraught with error since the custom of counting years from the time of Jesus Christ was not established until the 8th Century. Thus, both the Larousse and the History of France assert a birth date circa 466 whereas Stuart's "Royalty for Commoners" claims Clovis I was alive in the year 420! That date is necessary to claim that Sigebert I is the son of Childebert, son of Clovis, since Stuart claims Sigebert I was King of the Salic Francs from 481 to 511. Significant-Other - Evochilde before 486 - Evochilde was a concubine. Note - between 486 and 507: King of the Franks, Clovis I vanquished the Romans at Soissons in 486. Syagrius, the "Roman King" takes refuge in Toulouse under the protection of the King of the Wisigoths, Alaric [who had just become King in 484]. By the end of the year, Clovis I forced Alaric to give up Syagrius, and Clovis I secretly has Syagrius put to death. From 487 to 490, Clovis I extended his kingdom all the way to the Loire River, however, he respects the border of the Wisigoths to the South and of the Burgundians to the South-West, as well as that of the riparian Francs to the East. From 490 to 495, Clovis is occupied with the liquidation of the Salic Franc dynasty North of Gaule. King Chararic of Tongres is decapitated, and King Ragnacaire of Cambrai is executed. Upon the request for aid from the Riparian Francs, Clovis I defeats the Alamans (Germans) at the Battle of Tolbiac in 496 thus bringing Champagne under his jurisdiction. In 500, he wages war against Gondebaud, King of Burgundy defeating him near Dijon. Gondebaud retreats to Avignon. In 502, on the Cure and the Cousin, Clovis I and Gondebaud seal an alliance. From April to June 507, the French Army attack the Wisigoths, whose Kingdom extends from the Mediterranean to the ocean, and cross the Loire, going up the Valley of Calin toward Poitiers and encounter the Visigoth Army in the plain of Vouille, 15 km West of Clain. Alaric II, King of the Visigoths is killed and the Wisigoths thus are defeated. By 507, thanks to the efforts of his son, Thierry, the entire Meridional Gaule falls into Clovis I's control. In 508, the Franc Army lays siege on Arles in order to secure Provence. Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths, occupies Provence, and his general, Ibbas, crosses the Alps to deliver Arles from Clovis I's clutch. Theodoric conquers the Burgundians at Avignon and Orange and makes Amalaric, his grandson and son of Alaric II, King of the Wisigoths. Clovis I loses the Bas-Languedoc, then called Septimania. Around 510, Clovis has Cloderic, King of the Riparian tribes who had fought in his support at Vouille, assassinated, and proclaims himself King of the Riparians. Thus, the Kingdom extends from the Pyrenees, to the ocean to beyond the Rhine. Upon his death, according to Frankish custom, his kingdom was divided among his four sons: Thierry, Clodomir, Childebert and Clotaire. Married circa 493: Sainte Clotilde de Bourgogne , daughter of Chilperic, King de Bourgogne and N?; Clotilde was a Merovingien. By the time Clovis I married her, he already had a son through his concubine. Clotilde contributed to the conversion of Clovis to Christianity. After his death, she retired to the monastery of Saint-Martin in Tours (France). Her Feast Day is 3 June. Baptized: on 25 December 496; When the Queen, Clotilde, convinced Clovis I to have their son Ingomer baptized, he relented. Shortly afterwards, the son died. 481 - Clovis - "The Franks were a Germanic tribe just east of the Rhine who, even in the time of Julian, had carried through serious raids into Gaul. The rulers of the Franks were descended from a leader named Merovech, so that they were called the 'Merovingians.' In 481, a 15-year-old Merovingian named Clovis succeeded to the leadership of the Frankish tribes." [Isaac Asimov, Asimov's Chronology Of The World] "When Meroveus's son Childeric died in AD 481, he was followed by his son Clovis, the most prominent of all the Merovingians and traditionally reckoned founder of the French monarchy. At that time the Roman Church greatly feared the increasing popularity of the Arian religion in Gaul [a Christian faith which did not subscribe to the divinity of Jesus], and Catholicism was dangerously close to being completely overrun in Western Europe. Clovis was, in practice, neither Catholic nor Arian and it occured to the Roman hierarchy that the rise of Clovis could be used to their advantage. As it transpired, Clovis aided them quite inadvertently when he married the Burgundian Princess Clotilde." [Laurence Gardner, Realm Of The Ring Lords] 486 - Clovis - Clovis beat Syagrius at Soissons in northern Gaul. The last bit of land in the west that might be considered Roman was gone. 500 - Clovis - "About 500, Clovis defeated the Burgundians [his wife's kingsmen] in eastern Gaul." 507 - Clovis - "In 507, Clovis defeated the Visigoths and drove them out of Gaul." 508 - Clovis - "Clovis made his capital at Paris." 511 - Franks - "By the time of his death in 511, Clovis was master of virtually all of Gaul. In centuries to come, Gaul was the one province in the west that lost its name. It was Gaul no more, but eventually became 'France,' from the word 'Frank.' In German, the land is called 'Frankreich' ['realm of the Franks']. On Clovis's death, his four sons each inherited a portion of the Frankish kingdom and, as was inevitable, they fought eachother. This happened over and over and kept the Franks from becoming stronger than they were." [Isaac Asimov, Asimov's Chronology Of The World] -------------------------------- He was a member of the Merovingian dynasty. He succeeded his father Childeric I in 481 as King of the Salian Franks. These were a Germanic people occupying the area west of the lower Rhine, with their own center around Tournai and Cambrai, along the modern frontier between France and Belgium, in an area known as Toxandria. In 486, with the help of Ragnachar, Clovis defeated Syagrius, the last Roman official in northern Gaul, who ruled the area around Soissons in present-day Picardie. This victory extended Frankish rule to most of the area north of the Loire. After this, Clovis secured an alliance with the Ostrogoths, through the marriage of his sister Audofleda to their king, Theodoric the Great. He followed this victory with another in 491 over a small group of Thuringians east of his territories. Later, with the help of the other Frankish sub-kings, he defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac. He had previously married the Burgundian princess Clotilde (493), and, following his victory at Tolbiac, he converted in 496 to her Catholic faith. This was a significant change from the other Germanic kings, like the Visigoths and Vandals, who embraced the rival Arian beliefs. The conversion of Clovis to Roman Catholic Christianity, the religion of the majority of his subjects, strengthened the bonds between his Roman subjects and their Germanic conquerors. However, Bernard Bachrach has argued that this conversion from his Frankish pagan beliefs alienated many of the other Frankish sub-kings, and weakened his military position over the next few years. (Interestingly, the monk Gregory of Tours wrote that the pagan beliefs which Clovis abandoned were in Roman gods such as Jupiter and Mercury, rather than their Germanic equivalents. If Gregory's account is accurate, it suggests a strong affinity of Frankish rulers for the prestige of Roman culture, which they must have embraced as allies and federates of the Empire during the previous century.) Though he fought a battle in Dijon in the year 500, Clovis did not successfully subdue the Burgundian kingdom. It appears that he somehow gained the support of the Armoricans in the following years, for they assisted him in his defeat of the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse at Vouill�e (507), This victory confined the Visigoths to Spain and added most of Aquitaine to Clovis' kingdom. He then established Paris as his capital, and established an abbey dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul on the south bank of the Seine. All that remains of this great abbey is the Tour Clovis, a Romanesque tower which now lies within the grounds of the prestigious Lyc�ee Henri IV, just east of The Panth�eon. (After its founding, the abbey was renamed in honor of Paris' patron saint, Genevi�eve. It was demolished in 1802.) According to Gregory of Tours, following the Battle of Vouill�e, the Byzantine Emperor Anastasius I, granted Clovis the title of consul. Since Clovis' name does not appear in the consular lists, it is likely he was granted a suffect consulship. Gregory also records Clovis' systematic campaigns following his victory at Vouill�e to eliminate the other Frankish reguli or sub-kings. These included Sigibert of Cologne and his son Clotaire; Chararic another king of the Salian Franks; Ragnachar of Cambrai, his brother Ricchar, and their brother Rigomer of LeMans. Shortly before his death, Clovis called a synod of Gallic bishops to meet at Orl�eans to reform the church and create a strong link between the crown and the Catholic episcopate. Clovis I died in 511 and is interred Saint Denis Basilica, Paris, France, whereas his father had been buried with the older Merovingian kings at Tournai. Upon his death, his realm was divided among his four sons, (Theuderic, Chlodomer, Childebert, and Clotaire). This created the new political units of the Kingdoms of Reims, Orl�eans, Paris and Soissons and inaugurated a period of disunity which was to last with brief interruptions until the end (751) of his Merovingian dynasty. Popular tradition, based on French royal tradition, holds that the Franks were the founders of the French nation, and that Clovis was therefore the first King of France. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) ...x 1 NAME Clovis I "The Great" King of the /Franks/ 1 NAME Clovis I "The Great" /Meroving/ 1 BIRT 2 DATE 463 1 BIRT 2 DATE ABT. 466 2 PLAC Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France 1 DEAT 2 DATE 511 1 DEAT 2 DATE 27 NOV 511 2 PLAC Saint Pierre, France [De La Pole.FTW]ks" by Edward James; Collins; Pfafman; Women in the Wall.lly. Clovis' methods included conquest and murder. He personally killed one Frankish king and his brother after they had been turned over to him. See Chapter 3 of "The Franks." When he died in 511, the kingdom was divided among his four sons. In the next 50 years, the Franks and their Merovingian dynasty extended the power and influence of much of western Europe and became the dominant Germanic successor kingdom to the Roman Empire. Became a Christian and converted the Franks to Christianity. RC: Clovis I "the Great," King of the Salic Franks, 481-511. King of France. K: Clovis I, King of the Franks. Died 493 (picked up a marriage date?)reat. Sole King of Franks 511, King of Salic Franks 481-511. Became a devout Catholic responsible for Catholicism instead of Arianism in large portion of Western Europe. Great statesman. Conquered Central and Southern France and Gaul, later conquered the Ripuerian Franks. His dominions became France.First important ruler of the Merovingian dynasty. He succeeded his father, Childeric I, as king of the Salian Franks at age 15. His career focused largely on forging the Salian Franks on the northern Rhine River and the Ripuarian Franks on the lower Rhine into a single dominion. He began with a victory in 486 over Syagrius, the last Roman governor in northern Gaul. By 493, when he married the Burgundian princess Clotilda (later canonized as St Clotilda), Clovis had defeated many petty princes whose territories had surrounded his capital at Soissons. He next came into conflict in 496 with the confederation of Germanic tribes known as the Alamanni, who inhabited land east of his domains. According to legend, it was only by invoking the God of his Christian wife, Clotilda , that he defeated his enemy. Clotilda was almost certainly instrumental in Clovis's conversion to Christianity, and he was baptized in 496. He became the champion of orthodox Christians in every part of Gaul and was supported effectively by the church in all his campaigns. He continued to fight the Alamanni, who were completely conquered by 506; the next year the Visigoths were decisively defeated when their king, Alaric II, was killed by Clovis in a battle near Poitiers. Clovis made Paris the capital of the Frankish kingdom, which at that time included most of present-day France and southwestern Germany.s four sons."Clovis I," Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copy right (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation. Copy right (c) 1994 Funk & Wagna ll's Corporation.s defeats the Alemanni near Strasbourg and is baptized by a friend St Remigius (or Remy), Bishop of Rheims. When Clovis dies, his realm is devided among his 4 sons. "The Timetables of History, The new Third Revised Edition, by Bernard Grun,NGIAN monarchy. He rose from tribal chief to sole leader of the Salian FRANKS by dint of patience and murder. He won Gaul and SW Germany by fighting the Romans, Alemanni, Burgundians , and Visigoths. His wife, St Clotilda, encouraged his conversion (496) to Christianity. FILE: Concise Colu mbia Electronic Encyclopedia Copyright 1994, Columbia University Press.ranks NAME: Clovis the Riparian, K. of Cologne, Flourished about 420. Subjugated the Alamanni from the Main to the Alps. Conquered the kingdom of the Visigoths. Embraced Christianity. Source: The Mediterranean, Saga of the Sea , by Emil Ludwig, c. 194 2 pg. 559 RESEARCH NOTES: King of the Franks [Ref: ES I.1 #1] King of France [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p169] first king of all the Franks [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p425] (511-533) King of Franks [Ref: Mommaerts chart-Ansbertus-Main] 481-511: King of France [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p169] 481: succeeded father Childeric I [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p169] 482: King of the Franks [Ref: ES I.1 #1] succeeded father at age of 15 [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p425] 496: baptized on Christmas day, with 3000 of his followers [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p425] Born circa 466, son of Childeric I, King des Francs and Basine Andovera de Turinge , Clovis I became King between the Summer of 481 and Autumn of 482. According to Gregoire de Tours, he was only about 15 years of age at the time. In any case he was quite young as he was called "juvenis". Timelines here are bound to be fraught with error since the custom of counting years from the time of Jesus Christ was not established until the 8th Century. Thus, both the Larousse and the History of France assert a birth date circa 466 whereas Stuart's "Royalty for Commoners" claims Clovis I was alive in the year 420! That date is necessary to claim that Sigebert I is the son of Childebert, son of Clovis, since Stuart claims Sigebert I was King of the Salic Francs from 481 to 511. Significant-Other - Evochilde before 486 - Evochilde was a concubine. Note - between 486 and 507: King of the Franks, Clovis I vanquished the Romans at Soissons in 486. Syagrius, the "Roman King" takes refuge in Toulouse under the protection of the King of the Wisigoths, Alaric [who had just become King in 484]. By the end of the year, Clovis I forced Alaric to give up Syagrius, and Clovis I secretly has Syagrius put to death. From 487 to 490, Clovis I extended his kingdom all the way to the Loire River, however, he respects the border of the Wisigoths to the South and of the Burgundians to the South-West, as well as that of the riparian Francs to the East. From 490 to 495, Clovis is occupied with the liquidation of the Salic Franc dynasty North of Gaule. King Chararic of Tongres is decapitated, and King Ragnacaire of Cambrai is executed. Upon the request for aid from the Riparian Francs, Clovis I defeats the Alamans (Germans) at the Battle of Tolbiac in 496 thus bringing Champagne under his jurisdiction. In 500, he wages war against Gondebaud, King of Burgundy defeating him near Dijon. Gondebaud retreats to Avignon. In 502, on the Cure and the Cousin, Clovis I and Gondebaud seal an alliance. From April to June 507, the French Army attack the Wisigoths, whose Kingdom extends from the Mediterranean to the ocean, and cross the Loire, going up the Valley of Calin toward Poitiers and encounter the Visigoth Army in the plain of Vouille, 15 km West of Clain. Alaric II, King of the Visigoths is killed and the Wisigoths thus are defeated. By 507, thanks to the efforts of his son, Thierry, the entire Meridional Gaule falls into Clovis I's control. In 508, the Franc Army lays siege on Arles in order to secure Provence. Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths, occupies Provence, and his general, Ibbas, crosses the Alps to deliver Arles from Clovis I's clutch. Theodoric conquers the Burgundians at Avignon and Orange and makes Amalaric, his grandson and son of Alaric II, King of the Wisigoths. Clovis I loses the Bas-Languedoc, then called Septimania. Around 510, Clovis has Cloderic, King of the Riparian tribes who had fought in his support at Vouille, assassinated, and proclaims himself King of the Riparians. Thus, the Kingdom extends from the Pyrenees, to the ocean to beyond the Rhine. Upon his death, according to Frankish custom, his kingdom was divided among his four sons: Thierry, Clodomir, Childebert and Clotaire. Married circa 493: Sainte Clotilde de Bourgogne , daughter of Chilperic, King de Bourgogne and N?; Clotilde was a Merovingien. By the time Clovis I married her, he already had a son through his concubine. Clotilde contributed to the conversion of Clovis to Christianity. After his death, she retired to the monastery of Saint-Martin in Tours (France). Her Feast Day is 3 June. Baptized: on 25 December 496; When the Queen, Clotilde, convinced Clovis I to have their son Ingomer baptized, he relented. Shortly afterwards, the son died. 481 - Clovis - "The Franks were a Germanic tribe just east of the Rhine who, even in the time of Julian, had carried through serious raids into Gaul. The rulers of the Franks were descended from a leader named Merovech, so that they were called the 'Merovingians.' In 481, a 15-year-old Merovingian named Clovis succeeded to the leadership of the Frankish tribes." [Isaac Asimov, Asimov's Chronology Of The World] "When Meroveus's son Childeric died in AD 481, he was followed by his son Clovis, the most prominent of all the Merovingians and traditionally reckoned founder of the French monarchy. At that time the Roman Church greatly feared the increasing popularity of the Arian religion in Gaul [a Christian faith which did not subscribe to the divinity of Jesus], and Catholicism was dangerously close to being completely overrun in Western Europe. Clovis was, in practice, neither Catholic nor Arian and it occured to the Roman hierarchy that the rise of Clovis could be used to their advantage. As it transpired, Clovis aided them quite inadvertently when he married the Burgundian Princess Clotilde." [Laurence Gardner, Realm Of The Ring Lords] 486 - Clovis - Clovis beat Syagrius at Soissons in northern Gaul. The last bit of land in the west that might be considered Roman was gone. 500 - Clovis - "About 500, Clovis defeated the Burgundians [his wife's kingsmen] in eastern Gaul." 507 - Clovis - "In 507, Clovis defeated the Visigoths and drove them out of Gaul." 508 - Clovis - "Clovis made his capital at Paris." 511 - Franks - "By the time of his death in 511, Clovis was master of virtually all of Gaul. In centuries to come, Gaul was the one province in the west that lost its name. It was Gaul no more, but eventually became 'France,' from the word 'Frank.' In German, the land is called 'Frankreich' ['realm of the Franks']. On Clovis's death, his four sons each inherited a portion of the Frankish kingdom and, as was inevitable, they fought eachother. This happened over and over and kept the Franks from becoming stronger than they were." [Isaac Asimov, Asimov's Chronology Of The World] -------------------- Son of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion's monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres and Cologne. Although a Pagan, Childeric had kept up friendly relations with the bishops of Gaul, and when Clovis ascended the throne he received a most cordial letter of congratulation from St. Remigius, Archbishop of Reims. The young king early began his course of conquest by attacking Syagrius, son of Aegidius, the Roman Count. Having established himself at Soissons, he acquired sovereign authority over so great a part of Northern Gaul as to be known to his contemporaries as the King of Soissons. Syagrius, being defeated, fled for protection to Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, but the latter, alarmed by a summons from Clovis, delivered Syagrius to his conqueror, who had him decapitated in 486. Clovis then remained master of the dominions of Syagrius and took up his residence at Soissons. It would seem as if the episode of the celebrated vase of Soissons were an incident of the campaign against Syagrius, and it proves that, although a pagan, Clovis continued his father's policy by remaining on amicable terms with Gaulish episcopate. The vase, taken by the Frankish soldiers while plundering a church, formed part of the booty that was to be divided among the army. It was claimed by the bishop (St. Remigius?), and the king sought to have it awarded to himself in order to return it intact to the bishop, but a dissatisfied soldier split the vase with his battle-axe, saying to this king: "You will get only the share allotted you by fate". Clovis did not openly resent the insult, but the following year, when reviewing his army he came upon this same soldier and, reproving him for the the defective condition of his arms, he split his skull with an axe, saying: "It was thus that you treated the Soissons vase." This incident has often been cited to show that although in time of war a king has unlimited authority over his army, after the war his power is restricted and that in the division of booty the rights of the soldiers must be respected. After the defeat of Syagrius, Clovis extended his dominion as far as the Loire. It was owing to the assistance given him by the Gaulish episcopate that he gained possession of the country. The bishops, it is quite certain mapped out the regime that afterwards prevailed. Unlike that adopted in other barbarian kingdoms founded upon the ruins of the Roman Empire, this regime established absolute equality between the Gallo-Roman natives and their Germanic conquerors all sharing the same privileges. Procopius, a Byzantine writer has given us an idea of this agreement, but we know it best by its results. There was no distribution of Gaulish territory by the victors; established in the Belgian provinces, they had lands there to which they returned after each campaign. All the free men in the kingdom of Clovis, whether they were of Roman or of Germanic origin, called themselves Franks, and we must guard against the old mistake of looking upon the Franks after Clovis as no more than Germanic barbarians. Master of half of Gaul, Clovis returned to Belgium and conquered the two Salic kingdoms of Cambrai and Tongres (?), where his cousins Ragnacaire and Chararic reigned. These events have been made known to us only through the poetic tradition of the Franks which has singularly distorted them. According to this tradition Clovis called upon Chararic to assist him its his war against Syagrius, but Chararic's attitude throughout the battle was most suspicious, as he refrained from taking sides until he saw which of the rivals was to be victorious. Clovis longed to have revenge. Through a ruse he obtained possession of Chararic and his son and threw them into prison; he then had their heads shaved, and both were ordained, the father to the priesthood and the son to the diaconate. When Chararic bemoaned and wept over this humiliation his son exclaimed: "The leaves of a green tree have been cut but they will quickly bud forth again; may he who has done this perish as quickly!" This remark was reported to Clovis, and he had both father and son beheaded. Tradition goes on to say that Ragnacaire King of Cambrai, was a man of such loose morals he hardly respected his own kindred, and Farron, his favourite, was equally licentious. So great was the king's infatuation for this man that, if given a present, he would accept it for himself and his Farron. This filled his subjects with indignation and Clovis, to win them over to his side before taking the field, distributed among them money, bracelets, and baldries, all in gilded copper in fraudulent imitation of genuine gold. On different occasions Ragnacaire sent out spies to ascertain the strength of Clovis's army, and upon returning they said: "It is a great reinforcement for you and your Farron." Meanwhile Clovis advanced and the battle began. Being defeated, Ragnacaire sought refuge in flight, but was overtaken; made prisoner, and brought to Clovis, his hands bound behind him. "Why", said his conqueror have you permitted our blood to be humiliated by allowing yourself to be put in chains? It were better that you should die." And, so saying, Clovis dealt him his death-blow. Then, turning to Richaire, Ragnacaire's brother, who had been taken prisoner with the king, he said: "Had you but helped your brother, they would not have bound him", and he slew Richaire also. After these deaths the traitors discovered that they had been given counterfeit gold and complained of it to Clovis, but he only laughed at them. Rignomir, one of Ragnacaire's brothers, was put to death at Le Mans by order of Clovis, who took possession of the kingdom and the treasure of his victims. Such is the legend of Clovis; it abounds in all kinds of improbabilities, which cannot be considered as true history. The only facts that can be accepted are that Clovis made war upon Kings Ragnacaire and Chararic, put them to death and seized their territories. Moreover, the author of this article is of opinion that these events occurred shortly after the conquest of the territory of Syagrius, and not after the war against the Visigoths, as has been maintained by Gregory of Tours, whose only authority is an oral tradition, and whose chronology in this matter is decidedly misleading. Besides Gregory of Tours has not given us the name of Chararic's kingdom; it was long believed to have been established at Therouanne but it is more probable that Tongres was its capital city, since it was here that the Franks settled on gaining a foothold in Belgium. In 492 or 493 Clovis, who was master of Gaul from the Loire to the frontiers of the Rhenish Kingdom of Cologne, married Clotilda, the niece of Gondebad, King of the Burgundians. The popular epic of the Franks has transformed the story of this marriage into a veritable nuptial poem the analysis of which will be found in the article on Clotilda. Clotilda, who was a Catholic, and very pious, won the consent of Clovis to the baptism of their son, and then urged that he himself embrace the Catholic Faith. He deliberated for a long time. Finally, during a battle against the Alemanni--which without apparent reason has been called the battle of Tolbiac (Zulpich)--seeing his troops on the point of yielding, he invoked the aid of Clotilda's God, promised to become a Christian if only victory should be granted him. He conquered and, true to his word was baptized at Reims by St. Remigius, bishop of that city, his sister Albofledis and three thousand of his warriors at the same time embracing Christianity. Gregory of Tours, in his ecclesiastical history of the Franks has described this event, which took place amid great pomp at Christmas, 496. "Bow thy head, O Sicambrian", said St. Remigius to the royal convert "Adore what thou hast burned and burn what thou hast adored." According to a ninth-century legend found in the life of St. Remigius, written by the celebrated Hincmar himself Archbishop of Reims, the chrism for the baptismal ceremony was missing and was brought from heaven in a vase (ampulla) borne by a dove. This is what is known as the Sainte Ampoule of Reims, preserved in the treasury of the cathedral of that city and used for the coronation of the kings of France from Philip Augustus down to Charles X. The conversion of Clovis to the religion of the majority of his subjects soon brought about the union of the Gallo-Romans with their barbarian conquerors. While in all the other Germanic kingdoms founded on the ruins of the Roman Empire the difference of religion between the Catholic natives and Arian conquerers was a very active cause of destruction, in the Frankish kingdom, on the contrary, the fundamental identity of religious beliefs and equality of political rights made national and patriotic sentiments universal and produced the most perfect harmony between the two races. The Frankish Kingdom was thenceforth the representative and defender of Catholic interests throughout the West, while to his conversion Clovis owed an exceptionally brilliant position. Those historians who do not understand the problems of religious psychology have concluded that Clovis embraced Christianity solely from political motives, but nothing is more erroneous. On the contrary, everything goes to prove that his conversion was sincere, and the opposite cannot be maintained without refusing credence to the most trustworthy evidence. In the year 500 Clovis was called upon to mediate in a quarrel between his wife's two uncles, Kings Gondebad of Vienne and Godegisil of Geneva. He took sides with the latter, whom he helped to defeat Gondebad at Dijon, and then, deeming it prudent to interfere no further in this fratricidal struggle, he returned home, leaving Godegisil an auxiliary corps of five thousand Franks. After Clovis's departure Gondebad reconquered Vienne, his capital in which Godegisil had established himself. This reconquest was effected by a stratagem seconded by treachery, and Godegisil himself perished on the same occasion. The popular poetry of the Franks has singularly misrepresented this intervention of Clovis, pretending that, at the instigation of his wife Clotilda, he sought to avenge her grievances against her uncle Gondebad (see CLOTILDA) and that the latter king, besieged in Avignon by Clovis, got rid of his opponent through the agency of Aredius, a faithful follower. But in these poems there are so many fictions as to render the history in them indistinguishable. An expedition, otherwise important and profitable was undertaken by Clovis in the year 506 against Alaric II, King of the Visigoths of Aquitaine. He was awaited as their deliverer by the Catholics of that kingdom, who were being cruelly persecuted by Arian fanatics, and was encouraged in his enterprise by the Emperor Anastasius, who wished to crush this ally of Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths. Despite the diplomatic efforts made by the latter to prevent the war, Clovis crossed the Loire and proceeded to Vouille, near Poitiers, where he defeated and slew Alaric, whose demoralized troops fled in disorder. The Franks took possession of the Visigoth Kingdom as far as the Pyrenees and the Rhone, but the part situated on the left bank of this river was stoutly defended by the armies of Theodoric, and thus the Franks were prevented from seizing Arles and Provence. Notwithstanding this last failure, Clovis, by his conquest of Aquitaine, added to the Frankish crown the fairest of its jewels. So greatly did the Emperor Anastasius rejoice over the success attained by Clovis that, to testify his satisfaction, he sent the Frankish conqueror the insignia of the consular dignity, an honour always highly appreciated by the barbarians. The annexation of the Rhenish Kingdom of Cologne crowned the acquisition of Gaul by Clovis. But the history of this conquest, also, has been disfigured by a legend that Clovis instigated Chloderic, son of Sigebert of Cologne, to assassinate his father, then, after the perpetration of this foul deed, caused Chloderic himself to be assassinated, and finally offered himself to the Rhenish Franks as king, protesting his innocence of the crimes that had been committed. The only historical element in this old story, preserved by Gregory of Tours, is that the two kings of Cologne met with violent deaths, and that that Clovis, their relative, succeeded them partly by right of birth, partly by popular choice. The criminal means by which he is said to have reached this throne are pure creation of the barbarian imagination. Master now of a vast kingdom, Clovis displayed the same talent in governing that he had displayed in conquering it. From Paris, which he had finally made his capital, he administered the various provinces through the agency of counts (comites) established in each city and selected by him from the aristocracy of both races, conformably to the principle of absolute equality between Romans and barbarians, a principle which dominated his entire policy. He caused the Salic Law (Lex Salica) to be reduced to written form, revised end adapted to the new social conditions under which his fellow barbaricans were subsequently to live. Acknowledging the Church as the foremost civilizing force, he protected it in every way possible, especially by providing for it the National Council of Orleans (511), at which the bishops of Gaul settled many questions pertaining to the relations between Church and state. Hagiographic legends attribute to Clovis the founding of a great many churches and monasteries throughout France, and although the accuracy of this claim cannot be positively established, it is nevertheless certain that the influence of the council in this matter must have been considerable. However, history has preserved the memory of foundation which was undoubtedly due to Clovis: the church of the Apostles, later of Sainte-Genevi�eve, on what was then Mons Lucotetius, to the south of Paris. The king destined it as a mausoleum for himself and his queen Clotilda, and before it was completed his mortal remains were there interred. Clovis died at the age of forty-five. His sarcophagus remained in the crypt of Sainte-Genevi�eve until the time of the French Revolution, when it was broken open by the revolutionists, and his ashes scattered to the winds, the sanctuary of the beautiful church being destroyed. The history of this monarch has been so hopelessly distorted by popular poetry and so grossly disfigured by the vagaries of the barbarian imagination as make the portrayal of his character wellneigh impossible. However, from authentic accounts of him it may be concluded that his private life was not without virtues. As a statesman he succeeded in accomplishing what neither the genius of Theodoric the Great nor that of any contemporary barbarian king could achieve: upon the ruins of the Roman Empire he built up a powerful system, the influence of which dominated European civilization during many centuries, and from which sprang France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, and Switzerland, without taking into account that northern Spain and northern Italy were also, for a time, under the civilizing regime of the Frankish Empire. Clovis left four sons. Theodoric, the eldest, was the issue of union prior to that contracted with Clotilda, who was, however, the mother of the three others, Clodomir, Childebert, and Clotaire. They divided their father's kingdom among themselves, following the barbarian principle that sought promotion of personal rather than national interests, and looked upon royalty as the personal prerogative of the sons of kings. After the death of Clovis his daughter Clotilda, named after her mother, married Amalric, king of the Visigoths. She died young, being cruelly abused by this Arian prince, who seemed eager to wreak vengeance on the daughter of Clovis for the tragic death of Alaric II. AKA: Chlodovech, King Clovis I "the Great" AKA King of the Salic Franks (481-511), King of France. -------------- Clovis I (or Chlodowech, modern French "Louis") (c.466 - November 27 , 511 at Paris ), a member of the Merovingian dynasty, succeeded his father Childeric I in 481 as King of the Salic Franks , a Germanic people occupying the area west of the lower Rhine , with their own center around Tournai and Cambrai , along the modern frontier between France and Belgium , in an area known as Toxandria In 486 , with the help of Ragnachar, Clovis defeated Syagrius , the last Roman official in northern Gaul , whose rule covered the area around Soissons , in present-day Picardie . This victory extended Frankish rule to most of the area north of the Loire . After this, Clovis secured an alliance with the Ostrogoths , through the marriage of his sister Audofleda to their king, Theodoric the Great . He followed this victory with another in 491 over a small group of Thuringians east of his territories, then later, with the help of the other Frankish sub-kings, defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac . He had previously married the Burgundian princess Clotilde (493), and following his victory at Tolbiac he converted in 496 to her Catholic faith. This was a significant change from the other Germanic kings, like the Visigoths and Vandals , who embraced the rival Arian beliefs. The conversion of Clovis to Roman Catholic Christianity , the religion of the majority of his subjects, strengthened the bonds between his Roman subjects and their Germanic conquerors. However, Bernard Bachrach has argued that this conversion from his Frankish pagan beliefs alienated many of the other Frankish sub-kings, and weakened his military position over the next few years. He fought a battle in Dijon in the year 500, but did not successfully subdue the Burgundian kingdom. It appears that he somehow gained the support of the Armoricans in the following years, for they assisted him in his defeat of the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse at Vouill�e (507), a victory that confined the Visigoths to Spain , adding most of Aquitaine to his kingdom. He then established Paris as his capital, and established an abbey dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul on the south bank of the Seine. All that remains of this great abbey (later named in honour of Paris' patron saint, Genevi�eve, it was demolished in 1802) is the Tour Clovis, a Romanesque tower which now lies within the grounds of the prestigious Lyc�ee Henri IV, just east of The Panth�eon . Following the Battle of Vouill�e , according to Gregory of Tours , the Byzantine Emperor Anastasius I , granted Clovis the title of consul . Since Clovis' name does not appear in the consular lists , it is likely he was granted a suffect consulship. Gregory also records Clovis' systematic campaigns following his victory at Vouill�e to elimate the other Frankish reguli or sub-kings: these included Sigibert of Cologne and his son Chloderic; Chararic another king of the Salian Franks; Ragnachar of Cambrai , his brother Ricchar, and their brother Rigomer of LeMans . Shortly before his death, Clovis called a synod of Gallic bishops to meet at Orleans to reform the church and create a strong link between the crown and the Catholic episcopate. Clovis I died in 511 and is interred Saint Denis Basilica , Paris, France , whereas his father had been buried with the older Merovingian kings at Tournai. Upon his death, his realm was divided among his four sons, (Theuderic_I_of_Austrasia, Chlodomer , Childebert _I, Chlothar ) creating the new political units of the Kingdoms of Reims , Orl�eans , Paris and Soissons , inaugurating a period of disunity which was to last with brief interruptions until the end (751 ) of his Merovingian dynasty. Popular tradition, based on French royal tradition, holds that the Franks were the founders of the French nation, and that Clovis was therefore the first King of France. ------------------ He reigned from 481 to 511. His wife led him to embrace Christianity and 3000 of his followers were baptised in a single day. When he first listened to the story of Christ's crucifixion, he was so moved that he cried "If I had been there with my valiant Franks I would have avenged Him." (Came to throne at about age 15. . Chlodovech (aka Clovis) acceded 481 - King of Tournai. 2. Excerpt from "The Franks" by Godefroi Kurth, Transcribed by Michael C. Tinkler, from "The Catholic Encyclopedia", Volume VI, Copyright (c) 1909 by Robert Appleton Company, Online Edition Copyright (c) 1999 by Kevin Knight, Nihil Obstat, September 1, 1909. Remy Lafort, Censor Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York (full text in Clodian's notes): When Clovis (Chlodovech I) began to reign in 481, he was, like his father, King of Tournai only, but at an early date he began his career of conquest. In 486 he over threw the monarchy that Syagrius, son of Aegidius, had carved out for himself in Northern Gaul, and set up his court at Soissons; in 490 and 491 he took possession of the Salian Kingdoms of Cambrai and Tongres; in 496 he triumphantly repelled an invasion of the Alamanni; in 500 he interposed in the war of the Burgundian kings; in 506 he conquered Aquitaine; and at length he annexed the Ripuarian Kingdom of Cologne. Henceforth Gaul, from the Pyrenees to the Rhine, was subject to Clovis (Chlodovech I), with the exception of the territory in the southeast, i.e. the kingdom of the Burgundians and Provence. Established at Paris, Clovis (Chlodovech I) governed this kingdom by virtue of an agreement concluded with the bishops of Gaul, according to which natives and barbarians were to be on terms of equality, and all cause of friction between the two races was removed when, in 496, the king was converted to Catholicism. The Frankish kingdom thereupon took its place in history under more promising conditions than were to be found in any other state founded upon the ruins of the Roman Empire. All free men bore the title of Frank, had the same political status, and were eligible to the same offices. Besides, each individual observed the law of the people among whom he belonged; the Gallo-Roman lived according to the code, the barbarian according to the Salian or Ripuarian law; in other words, the law was personal, not territorial. If there were any privileges they belonged to the Gallo-Romans, who, in the beginning were the only ones on whom the episcopal dignity was conferred. The king governed the provinces through his counts, and had a considerable voice in the selection of the clergy. The drawing up of the Salian Law (Lex Salica), which seems to date from the early part of the reign of Clovis (Chlodovech I), and the Council of Orl�eans, convoked by him and held in the last year of his reign, prove that the legislative activity of this king was not eclipsed by his military energy. Although founder of a kingdom destined to such a brilliant future, Clovis (Chlodovech I) did not know how to shield it against a custom in vogue among the barbarians, i.e. the division of power among the sons of the king. This custom originated in the pagan idea that all kings were intended to reign because they were descended from the gods. Divine blood flowed in the veins of all the king's sons, each of whom, therefore, being a king by birth, must have his share of the kingdom. This view, incompatible with the formation of a powerful, durable monarchy, had been vigorously rejected by Genseric the Vandal, who, to secure the indivisibility of his kingdom, had established in his family a certain order of succession. Either because he died suddenly or for some other reason, Clovis (Chlodovech I) took no measures to abolish this custom, which continued among the Franks until the middle of the ninth century and, more than once, endangered their nationality. After the death of Clovis (Chlodovech I), therefore, his four sons divided his kingdom, each reigning from a different centre: Thierry (Theuderic I) at Metz, Clodomir (Chlodomer) at Orl�eans, Childebert at Paris, and Clotaire (Chlotar) at Soissons. They continued the career of conquest inaugurated by their father, and, in spite of the frequent discords that divided them, augmented the estates he had left them. The principal events of their reign were: * The destruction of the Kingdom of Thuringia by Thierry (Theuderic I) in 531, which extended Frankish power into the heart of what is now Germany; * the conquest of the Kingdom of the Burgundians by Childebert and Clotaire (Chlotar I) in 532, after their brother Clodomir (Chlodomer) had perished in a previous attempt to overthrow it in 524; * the cession of Provence to the Franks by the Ostrogoths in 536, on condition that the former would assist them in the war just declared against them by Emperor Justinian. But instead of helping the Ostrogoths, the Franks under Theudebert, son of Thierry (Theuderic I), taking shameful advantage of this oppressed people, cruelly pillaged Italy until the bands under the command of Leuthar and Butilin were exterminated by Narses in 553. Other SOURCES: Founder of the Empire of the Franks "Rulers of the World" by R.F.Tapsell Born: circa 466, son of Childeric I, King des Francs and Basine Andovera de Turinge , Clovis I became King between the Summer of 481 and Autumn of 482. According to Gregoire de Tours, he was only about 15 years of age at the time. In any case he was quite young as he was called "juvenis". Timelines here are bound to be fraught with error since the custom of counting years from the time of Jesus Christ was not established until the 8th. Century. Thus, both the Larousse and the History of France assert a birth date circa 466 whereas Stuart's "Royalty for Commoners" claims Clovis I was alive in the year 420! That date is necessary to claim that Sigebert I is the son of Childebert, son of Clovis, since Stuart claims Sigebert I was King of the Salic Francs from 481 to 511. Significant-Other: Evochilde before 486 - Evochilde was a concubine. Note - between 486 and 507: King of the Franks, Clovis I vanquished the Romans at Soissons in 486. Syagrius, the "Roman King" takes refuge in Toulouse under the protection of the King of the Wisigoths, Alaric [who had just become King in 484] . By the end of the year, Clovis I forced Alaric to give up Syagrius, and Clovis I secretly has Syagrius put to death. From 487 to 490, Clovis I extended his kingdom all the way to the Loire River, however, he respects the border of the Wisigoths to the South and of the Burgundians to the South-West, as well as that of the riparian Francs to the East. From 490 to 495, Clovis is occupied with the liquidation of the Salic Franc dynasty North of Gaule. King Chararic of Tongres is decapitated, and King Ragnacaire of Cambrai is executed. Upon the request for aid from the Riparian Francs, Clovis I defeats the Alamans (Germans) at the Battle of Tolbiac in 496 thus bringing Champagne under his jurisdiction. In 500, he wages war against Gondebaud, King of Burgundy defeating him near Dijon. Gondebaud retreats to Avignon. In 502, on the Cure and the Cousin, Clovis I and Gondebaud seal an alliance. From April to June 507, the French Army attack the Wisigoths, whose Kingdom extends from the Mediterranean to the ocean, and cross the Loire, going up the Valley of Calin toward Poitiers and encounter the Visigoth Army in the plain of Vouille, 15 km West of Clain. Alaric II, King of the Visigoths is killed and the Wisigoths thus are defeated. by 507, thanks to the efforts of his son, Thierry, the entire Meridional Gaule falls into Clovis I's control. In 508, the Franc Army lays siege on Arles in order to secure Provence. Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths, occupies Provence, and his general, Ibbas, crosses the Alps to deliver Arles from Clovis I's clutch. Theodoric conquers the Burgundians at Avignon and Orange and makes Amalaric, his grandson and son of Alaric II, King of the Wisigoths. Clovis I loses the Bas-Languedoc, then called Septimania. Around 510, Clovis has Cloderic, King of the Riparian tribes who had fought in his support at Vouille, assassinated, and proclaims himself King of the Riparians. Thus, the Kingdom extends from the Pyrenees, to the ocean to beyond the Rhine. Upon his death, according to Frankish custom, his kingdom was divided among his four sons: Thierry, Clodomir, Childebert and Clotaire. Married circa 493: Sainte Clotilde de Bourgogne , daughter of Chilperic, King de Bourgogne and N?; Clotilde was a Merovingien. By the time Clovis I married her, he already had a son through his concubine. Clotilde contributed to the conversion of Clovis to Christianity. After his death, she retired to the monastery of Saint-Martin in Tours (France). Her Feast Day is 3 June. Baptized: on 25 December 496; When the Queen, Clotilde, convinced Clovis I to have their son Ingomer baptized, he relented. Shortly afterwards, the son died, and Clovis I scolded Clotilde indicating that had Ingomer been consecrated to his gods, the neonate would not have died. When Clotilde had Clodomir, she again prevailed on Clovis I to have his son baptized. The child fell seriously ill shortly after, and again Clovis I blamed Clotilde's gods. While at war with the Alamans, it looked like Clovis I's army might be defeated, and Clovis I in desperation, swore to God and to Jesus Christ that he would have himself baptized and adhere to the Faith, if only he would be granted victory. Thereupon, the Allemans, fled and their King was killed. The Allemans surrendered. Scolars disagree on the date of the baptism and some indicate it was in 497 or propose the year 498 and perhaps even in 506.
b. Note:   BI52586
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES I #1, ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Capet #1], parents: [Ref: ES I #1, ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Capet #1, Settipani CharlAdd90, Settipani CharlAnc p140], father: [Ref: CMH p154, Tapsell Dynasties p169, Wagner PedigreeProgress #27], name: Chlodowich (Chlodwig) [Ref: ES I.1 #1]
c. Note:   DI52586
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani CharlAnc p140] 511 [Ref: CMH p154, ES I #1, Settipani Capet #1, Tapsell Dynasties p169, Wagner PedigreeProgress #27], place: [Ref: Houdry CharlAnc] Sources with Inaccurate Information: date: 533 [Ref: Mommaerts chart-Ansbertus-Main]
d. Note:   XI52586
Note:   Sources for this Information: place: [Ref: ES I.1 #1]
e. Note:   NF53761
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: first marriage of Clodowech [Ref: ES I.1 #1] first marriage of Clovis [Ref: Settipani Capet #1], names: Clodowech & vornehme Frankin [Ref: ES I.1 #1] Clovis & unk frankish princess of Cologne [Ref: Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Capet #1], child: [Ref: ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Capet #1]
f. Note:   NF14427
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: Settipani Capet #1] (492) [Ref: ES I #1] 492/494 [Ref: ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc], names: [Ref: Settipani CharlAnc p141], child: [Ref: CMH p154, ES I #1, ES I.1 #1, Houdry CharlAnc, Settipani Capet #1, Settipani Capet p67, Settipani CharlAnc p139, Wagner PedigreeProgress #27]


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