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a. Note:   OR "BAUDOIN"; SUCCESSOR TO HIS BROTHER AS KING OF JERUSALEM; G.M. ORDER OF SION BIBLIOGRAPHY: Grousset, Rene, The Epic of the Crusades. French 1939. Translation to English by Noel Lindsay. New York: Orion Press, 1970. MCL 940.18 GRO Moriarty, G Andrews, Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III And Queen Philippa. Salt Lake: Mormon Pioneer Genealogical Society, 1985. LDS Film#0441438. nypl#ARF-86-2555. Murray, Alan V, The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: A Dynastic History 1099-1125, Oxford: Linacre Unit for Prospographical Research, 2000. vol 4 of Occasional Publications. NYPL ASB 02-6745. Ravilious, John, Descent from Eustace II of Boulogne to Eleanor de Furnival. Posting to soc.genealogy.medieval (email list GEN-MEDIEVAL) on 6/16/2005-163819. Subject: Re: Eleanor de Furnival, wife of Richard de Brewes. Available at http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/2005-06/1118954299. Author address: Therav3 at aol dot com. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten Die Regierenden Hauser der Ubrigen Staaten Europas. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. III.4 (#601-#820): Das Feudale Frankreich und sein Einfluss auf die Welt des Mittelalters. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1989. Wagner, Anthony, Pedigree and Progress, Essays in the Genealogical Interpretation of History, London, Philmore, 1975. Rutgers Alex CS4.W33. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, David Faris, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, 7th Edition, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1992. RESEARCH NOTES: Count of Edessa, King of Jerusalem [Ref: Weis AR7 #158A] King of Jerusalem [Ref: Wagner PedigreeProgress #1] succeeded older brother Godfrey as King of Jerusalem when Godfrey took title Advocate of the Holy Sepulcher [Ref: Weis AR7 #158A] While he was still only Count of Edessa, Baldwin had married Princess Arda, the daughter of an Armenian chief of the Taurus, a political marriage if there ever was one, which won him the support of the predominant Armenian element in Edessa. But after his coronation in Jerusalem, where the Armenians counted for nothing, this union was a burden to him. In the same cavalier fashion in which he had deposed the patriarch [Daimbert, with whom Baldwin struggled for power in Jerusalem] he placed his wife in a convent. On the precise motives for his decision, the good William of Tyre loses himself in conjecctures. "Some men said that he left her for a richer bride, since she was dowerless, others that he had perceived her to be very flighty." The queen, in any case, seemed at first highly delighted to enter into religion and led a most edifying life in the convent, after which she modestly prayed the king to let her go to Constantinople to see her parents and beg an endowment for her nunnery. Once out of the kingdom, she joyfully cast aside her nun's habit and gave herself up entirely to pleasure, "delivering her body to striplings and to other folk." As for King Baldwin, it is said that he took no less pleasure in the return to a bachelor life. But the bachelor life brought him no money, and it was then that he cast his eyes on Adelaide of Sicily. Adelaide was the widow of the Norman Count Roger I of Sicily, who had died in 1101. Despite her ripe age, she was one of the finest matches of the century. Baldwin set his sights on her. He was impecunious in the extreme and the pay of his knights was a constant problem to him. He asked for the dowager's hand in marriage. She was flattered at being chosen again by a knight of sicu prestige, moved at the thought of wearing with im the sacred crown of Jerusalem. The marriage treaty was concluded, and early in August 1113 Adelaide landed at Acre. But once the festival was over, the irregular situation, to say the least of it, had to be faced. Baldwin;'s former wife was still alive. The king was therefore a bigamist. Adelaide, it appears, was very distressed to learn of it officially, though it seems somewhat strange that she had not known of it earlier. Pope Paschal II took a dim view of Baldwin;'s bigamy, and in 1117, after a serious illness, Baldwin was persuaded to dismiss Adelaide. Adelaide claimed to have been tricked, with apparent justice, since Baldwin had by this time completely devoured the rich dowry brought from Sicily. [Ref: Grousset Crusades p73]
b. Note:   DI28706
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES II #206, ES III.4 #621, Moriarty Plantagenet p165, Weis AR7 #158A] 1118 [Ref: John Ravilious SGM 6/16/2005-163819, Wagner PedigreeProgress #1] III 1118 [Ref: ES III.4 #700, ES III.4 #705], place: [Ref: ES III.4 #621]
c. Note:   NF75877
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: first marriage of Baldwin [Ref: Murray Jerusalem p158] vor 1096 [Ref: ES III.4 #621, ES III.4 #700, ES III.4 #705]
d. Note:   NF89345
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: 1098/1100 [Ref: ES III.4 #621] second marriage of Baldwin [Ref: MurrayJerusalem p158], names: Baldwin & an Armenien princess whose name has notsurvived [Ref: Murray Jerusalem p158]
e. Note:   NF11766
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES III.4 #621] abt 1113 [Ref: Grousset Crusades p72] second marriage of Adelaide [Ref: ES II #206] third marriage of Baldwin and second of Adelaide [Ref: Murray Jerusalem p158]


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