Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Marguerite Capet: Birth: Abt 1286 in Paris, Seine, France. Death: Aft 1294

  2. Louis X Capet: Birth: 4 Oct 1289 in Paris, Ville-DE-Paris, France. Death: 5 Jun 1316 in Vincennes, Val-DE-Marne, France

  3. Blanche Capet: Birth: 1290 in , Paris, Seine, France. Death: Aft 13 Apr 1294

  4. Philippe Capet: Birth: 1291-1292 in , Paris, Seine, France. Death: 3 Jan 1322 in Longchamps, Seine, France

  5. Isabella "The Fair" De Capet (Plantagenet): Birth: 1292 in Paris, Louvre, Seine, France. Death: 22 Aug 1358 in Hertford Castle, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England

  6. Philip V The Tall, King Of France: Birth: 1294 in Paris, Seine, France. Death: 1322 in Longchamps, France

  7. Charles Capet: Birth: 1295 in , Clermont, Oise, France. Death: 1 Feb 1328 in Vincennes, Val-DE-Marne, France

  8. Robert IV Capet: Birth: 1297 in , Paris, Seine, France. Death: Aug 1308


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Notes
a. Note:   NI160329
Note:   Philip IV, byname PHILIP THE FAIR, French PHILIPPE LE BEL (b. 1268, Fontainebleau, Fr.--d. Nov. 29, 1314, Fontainebleau), king of France from 1285 to 1314 (and of Navarre, as Philip I, from 1284 to 1305, ruling jointly with his wife, Joan I of Navarre). His long struggle with the Roman papacy ended with the transfer of the Curia to Avignon, French. (beginning the so-called Babylonian Captivity, 1309-78). He also secured French royal power by wars on barons and neighbours and by restriction of feudal usages. His three sons were successively kings of France: Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV. (see also Index: Roman Catholicism) Early years. Born at Fontainebleau while his grandfather was still ruling, Philip, the second son of Philip III the Bold and grandson of St. Louis (Louis IX), was not yet three when his mother, Isabella of Aragon, died on her return from the crusade on which Louis IX had perished. The motherless Philip and his three brothers saw little of their father, who, stricken by Isabella's death, threw himself into campaigning and administrative affairs. His troubled childhood and the series of blows he suffered explain in some measure the conflicting elements in his adult personality. In 1274 his father married Marie de Brabant, a beautiful and cultivated woman, and, with her arrival at court, intrigue began to flourish. In the same year, the two-year-old Joan, heiress of Champagne and Navarre, was welcomed as a refugee. Reared with the royal children, she would, when she was 12, become the bride of Philip the Fair. In 1276 Philip's older brother, Louis, died, and the shock of this event, which suddenly made Philip heir of the kingdom, was compounded by persistent rumours of poisoning and suspicions that Philip's stepmother intended to see Isabella's remaining sons destroyed. Vague allegations were circulated that Louis's death was linked with certain unspecified "unnatural acts" of his father. These rumours, never satisfactorily put to rest, together with the unexpected change in Philip's fortunes, apparently served to arouse in him feelings of insecurity and mistrust. Consequently, Philip turned elsewhere in search of a model for his own conduct. He found it in Louis IX, whose memory was increasingly venerated as the number of miracles attributed to him mounted. Reports of Louis's exacting standards of rulership and his saintly virtues were reinforced by the precepts of the religious advisers who surrounded the adolescent Philip. A more self-confident person might have been able to discriminate realistically among the sometimes artificially exaggerated stories and the utopian ideals. Philip, however, became convinced that it was his God-given duty to attain the lofty goals of his grandfather. When Philip was 16, he was knighted and married to Joan of Navarre. In 1285 he accompanied his father to the south on a campaign to install Philip's brother Charles on the throne of Aragon. He had no sympathy with the enterprise, however, which was backed by his stepmother and aimed against the King of Aragon, his late mother's brother. When his father died in October 1285, Philip immediately abandoned the venture. Wars with England and Flanders. In the first years of Philip's reign the Aragonese affair was settled, and Philip intensified his predecessors' efforts to reform and rationalize the administration of the realm. He dispatched investigators to inquire into the conduct of royal officials and into infringements upon royal prerogatives. Philip persisted in seeking such reforms, which strengthened the monarchy's position but angered the nobles, townsmen, and ecclesiastics who had profited from the laxer policies of earlier kings. War with England began in 1294, initiating a 10-year period of conflict that severely strained Philip's resources. There had been some naval clashes, but full-scale war might well have been avoided Philip IV (the Fair), 1268-1314 (r.1285-1314), arrested (1301) Bisho p Saisset and caused a quarrel with Pope BONIFACE VIII, who denounced th e king. Philip retaliated by convoking the first STATES-GENERAL (1302-3 ) to hear a justification of his actions. Threatened with excommunication , Philip had Boniface seized and later gained control of the PAPACY wit h the election of CLEMENT V, who transferred (1309) the papacy to Avignon . Beginning in 1294, Philip tried to conquer Guienne from EDWARD I of Eng land, but was forced to concede (1303) the duchy to Edward. His attempt s to subdue the Flemish led to the disastrous French defeat (1302) at Cou rtrai. His son, LOUIS X, succeeded him. BIOGRAPHY: Philip IV of France From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Philippe IV, the Fair (French Philippe le Bel) (1268 - November 29, 1314 ) was King of France from 1285 to 1314. A member of the Capetian Dynasty , he was born at the Royal Palace of Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne the so n of King Philippe III and Isabelle d'Aragon. He was called Philippe th e Fair because of his handsome appearance. As king, he was determined t o strengthen the monarchy at any cost . - Philippe IV - Philippe married Jeanne of Navarre (1271-1305) on August 16, 1284 . King Philippe IV arrested Jews so he could seize their goods to accommoda te his spendthrift lifestyle. When he also levied taxes on the French cle rgy of one half their annual income, he caused an uproar within the Roma n Catholic Church and the papacy. Still, Philippe emerged victorious wit h a French archbishop made Pope Clement V and the official papal palace w as built in Avignon in southern France . On October 13, 1307, what may have been all the Knights Templar in Franc e were simultaneously arrested by agents of Philippe the Fair, to be late r tortured into admitting heresy in the Order. A modern historical view i s that Philippe, who seized the treasury and broke up the monastic bankin g system, simply sought to control it for himself . Philippe IV?s rule signaled the decline of the papacy?s power from its ne ar complete authority. He died in a hunting accident and is buried in Sai nt Denis Basilica. The children of Philippe IV and Jeanne of Navarre were : Louis X - (October 4, 1289 - June 5, 1316 ) Isabelle - (1292 - August 23, 1358 ) Philippe V - (1293 - January 3, 1322 ) Charles IV - (1294 - February 1, 1328 ) All three of their sons would become king of France and their daughter, Queen of England. ------------- !Known for his conflict with the papacy. Through marriage became the ruler of Navarre and Champagne. As a result of his financial needs, Philip greatly increased taxes, debased the coinage several times, and arrested the Jews and the Lombards (Italian bankers), appropriating the assets of the former and demanding large subsidies from the latter. [Funk & Wagnalls] !King of France, 1285-1314. [Oxford History of Medieval Europe] !Gave France a national standing army, supported by the king's treasury. Thus the old feudal levy disappeared in favor of a trained body of soldiers. A large body of administrators was needed to look after the various affairs of the kingdom, and control of these officials was centralized under the king. They were required to submit to him reports of the progress of their work. Won the right to tax the clergy. [Outline History of Mankind] !Son of Philippe III and Isabelle of Aragon; husband of Jeanne, Queen of Navarre; father of Princess Isabelle. [Ped. of Charlemagne, Vol. I, p. 64; Vol.III, p. 105 ] !Had Pope Benedict XI poisoned by two cardinals. Philip then placed Clement V in the papacy. [Nations of the World - Italy, Vol. XXV, p. 459] The history of the royal family in France in 1314 is filled with scandals when the king's daughters-in-law were found to have committed adultery. [Edward I, p. 133] Before 1300 Pope Boniface VIII had begun that quarrel with the French King Philip IV which was to last his life. Philip, following the advice of counsellors trained in civil, rather than canon law, was building the secular state, and elaborating its theory. When Boniface issued his Bull CLERICIS LAICOS in 1296 to stop secular taxation of clergy without papal permission, Philip forced the Pope to back down. In October 1301 Philip arrested one of his bishops on a charge of (among other things) treason, and asked the Pope to unfrock him so that he could proceed to punishment. Boniface naturally insisted on an ecclesiastical trial, and an acrimonious correspondence blew up, which was made much worse by the circulation on both sides of forged letters, using even more disgraceful phrases. For example Philip is supposed to have written, 'Philip, by the grace of God, King of the Franks, to Boniface who gives himself out for Supreme Pontiff, little or no greeting. Let your great fatuousness know that....' The quarrel grew larger, ending up with Philip, under the advice of his chief Minister William Nogaret, who condemned the Pope as a heretic and usurper, and persuaded his King to call a General Council to depose him in March 1303. William was sent off to Italy, and plotted with the Colonna to capture Boniface. In September they attacked Anagni, and forced their way in to the Pope. Throughout the next day, looting and drinking, the attackers argued what to do. On the following day the citizens decided for them: rallying to the Pope, they flung the invaders out, and brought Boniface out of prison into the market-place. The world was deeply shocked at the French action, and Boniface might have built on this for further victories; but his pride was broken, and on 12 October of that same year he died. [Who's Who in the Middle Ages, p. 45-46] KING OF FRANCE 1285-1314 (BECAME KING 10/5/1285, AND WAS CONSECRATED AT RHEIMS 1/6/1286); KNOWN AS "PHILLIP THE FAIR""LE BEL"; DIED OF A STROKE ------------------- As a king, Philip was determined to strengthen the monarchy at any cost. He relied, more than any of his predecessors, on a professional bureaucracy of legalists. Because to the public he kept aloof and left specific policies, especially unpopular ones, to his ministers, he was called a "useless owl" by his contemporaries. His reign marks the French transition from a charismatic monarchy ? which could all but collapse in an incompetent reign ? to a bureaucratic kingdom, a move towards modernity. Philip married queen Joan of Navarre (1271?1305) on August 16, 1284. The primary administrative benefit of this was the inheritance of Joan in Champagne and Brie, which were adjacent to the royal demesne in Ile-de-France and became thus effectively united to the king's own lands, forming an expansive area. During the reigns of Joan herself, and her three sons (1284?1328), these lands belonged to the person of the king; but by 1328 they had become so entrenched in the royal domain that king Philip VI of France (who was not an heir of Joan) switched lands with the then rightful heiress, Joan II of Navarre, with the effect that Champagne and Brie remained part of the royal demesne and Joan received compensation with lands in western Normandy. The Kingdom of Navarre in the Pyrenees was not so important to contemporary interests of the French crown. It remained in personal union 1284?1329, after which it went its separate way. Philippe gained Lyon for France in 1312. Philip had various contacts with the Mongol power in the Middle East, who were trying to obtain the cooperation of Christian powers to fight against the Muslims. He received the embassy of the Mongolian Chinese monk Rabban Bar Sauma, and an elephant as a present. Philip seemingly responded positively to the request of the embassy: "If it be indeed so that the Mongols, though they are not Christians, are going to fight against the Arabs for the capture of Jerusalem, it is meet especially for us that we should fight (with them), and if our Lord willeth, go forth in full strength." ?"The Monks of Kublai Khan Emperor of China. Philip also gave the embassy numerous presents, and sent one of his noblemen, Gobert de Helleville, to accompany Bar Sauma back to Mongol lands: "And he said unto us, "I will send with you one of the great Amirs whom I have here with me to give an answer to King Arghon"; and the king gave Rabban Sawma gifts and apparel of great price." ?"The Monks of Kublai Khan Emperor of China Gobert de Helleville departed on February 2, 1288, with two clercs Robert de Senlis and Guillaume de Bruy�eres, as well as arbaletier Audin de Bourges. They joined Bar Sauma in Rome, and accompanied him to Persia. The Mongol ruler Arghun, based in Baghdad, further wrote to him a letter in 1289, in answer to a letter sent by Philip to him in 1288, specifically outlining military cooperation: "Under the power of the eternal sky, the message of the great king, Arghun, to the king of France..., said: I have accepted the word that you forwarded by the messengers under Saymer Sagura (Bar Sauma), saying that if the warriors of Il Khaan invade Egypt you would support them. We would also lend our support by going there at the end of the Tiger year?s winter (1290), worshiping the sky, and settle in Damascus in the early spring (1291). If you send your warriors as promised and conquer Egypt, worshiping the sky, then I shall give you Jerusalem. If any of our warriors arrive later than arranged, all will be futile and no one will benefit. If you care to please give me your impressions, and I would also be very willing to accept any samples of French opulence that you care to burden your messengers with. I send this to you by Myckeril and say: All will be known by the power of the sky and the greatness of kings. This letter was scribed on the sixth of the early summer in the year of the Ox at Ho?ndlon." ?France royal archives Contrary to Saint Louis, Philip apparently did not pursue with such military plans in the Middle East in the form of a Crusade. He did however organize a military collaboration with the Mongols through the Knights Templar and their leader Jacques de Molay against the Mamluks. The plan was to coordinate actions between the Christian military orders, the King of Cyprus, the aristocracy of Cyprus and Little Armenia and the Mongols of the khanate of Ilkhan (Persia). In 1298 or 1299, Jacques de Molay halted a Mamluk invasion with military force in Armenia possibly because of the loss of Roche-Guillaume, the last Templar stronghold in Cilicia, to the Mamluks. However, when the Mongol khan of Persia, Gh�az�an, defeated the Mamluks in the Battle of Wadi al-Khazandar in December 1299, the Christian forces were not ready to take an advantage of the situation. In 1300, Jacques de Molay made his order commit raids along the Egyptian and Syrian coasts to weaken the enemy's supply lines as well as to harass them, and in November that year he joined the occupation of the tiny fortress island of Ruad (today called Arwad) which faced the Syrian town of Tortosa. The intent was to establish a bridgehead in accordance with the Mongol alliance, but the Mongols were delayed for months, and the Crusaders had to retreat to Arwad. In 1300, rumors circulated in Europe that the Mongols had finally conquered the Holy Land and Jerusalem, and handed it over to the Christians, but this apparently did not happen. In September 1302 the Templars were driven out of Ruad by the attacking Mamluk forces from Egypt, and many were massacred when trapped on the island. The island of Ruad was lost, and when Gh�az�an died in 1304 dreams of a rapid reconquest of the Holy Land were destroyed. In April 1305, the new Mongol ruler Oljeitu sent letters to Philip, the Pope, and Edward I of England. He again offered a military collaboration between the Christian nations of Europe and the Mongols against the Mamluks. European nations accordingly prepared a crusade, but were delayed, and the crusade never took place. In 1310, Guillaume de Nogaret wrote a memorandum about capturing the Holy Land without the Templars, but in association with the Mongols, the Greeks and the harbour cities of Italy. The expedition would be financed by the revenues of the Templars and a tax on the Hospitallers and other orders. On April 4, 1312, a Crusade was promulgated at the Council of Vienne. In 1313, Philip "took the cross", making the vow to go on a Crusade in the Levant, thus responding to Pope Clement V's call for a Crusade. He was however warned against leaving by Enguerrand de Marigny and died soon after in a hunting accident. As Duke of Aquitaine, the English king Edward I was a vassal to Philip, and had to pay him homage. Following the Fall of Acre in 1291 however, the former allies started to show dissent. In 1293, following a naval incident between the Normans and the English, Philip summoned Edward to the French court, but the latter, busy with trouble in Scotland, refused to appear. Philip used this pretext to strip Edward of all his possessions in France, thereby initiating hostilities with England. The outbreak of hostilities with England in 1294 was the inevitable result of the competitive expansionist monarchies, triggered by a secret Franco-Scottish pact of mutual assistance against Edward I, who was Philip's brother-in-law, having married Philip's sister Marguerite; inconclusive campaigns for the control of Gascony to the southwest of France were fought in 1294?98 and 1300?03. Philippe gained Guienne but was forced to return it. No major war had been fought in Europe since the 'teens, and in the interim the nature of warfare had changed: it had become more professional, technologically more advanced and much more expensive. The search for income to cover military expenditures set its stamp on Philip's reign and his contemporary reputation. Pursuant to the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1303), the marriage of Philip's daughter Isabella to the Prince of Wales, heir of Philip's enemy, celebrated at Boulogne, 25 January 1308, was meant to seal a peace; instead it would produce an eventual English claimant to the French throne itself, and the Hundred Years War. In the shorter term, Philip arrested Jews so he could seize their assets to accommodate the inflated costs of modern warfare: he expelled them from his French territories on July 22, 1306 (see The Great Exile of 1306). His financial victims included Lombard bankers and rich abbots. He was condemned by his enemies in the Catholic Church for his spendthrift lifestyle. He debased the coinage. When he also levied taxes on the French clergy of one half their annual income, he caused an uproar within the Roman Catholic Church and the papacy, prompting Pope Boniface VIII to issue the Bull Clericis laicos, forbidding the transference of any church property to the French Crown and prompting a drawn-out diplomatic battle with the King. In order to condemn the pope, Philip convoked an assembly of bishops, nobles and grand bourgeois of Paris, a precursor to the Etats G�en�eraux that appeared for the first time during his reign, a measure of the professionalism and order that his ministers were introducing into government. Philip emerged victorious, after having sent his agent William Nogaret to arrest Boniface at Anagni, when the French archbishop Bertrand de Goth was elected pope as Clement V and the official seat of the papacy moved to Avignon, an enclave surrounded by French territories, commencing the captive Avignon Papacy. He suffered a major embarrassment when an army of 2,500 noble men-at-arms (Knights and Squires) and 4,000 infantry he sent to suppress an uprising in Flanders was defeated in the Battle of the Golden Spurs near Kortrijk on 11 July 1302. Philip reacted with energy to the humiliation and personally defeated the Flemings at Mons-en-P�ev�ele two years later. Finally, in 1305, Philip forced the Flemish to accept a harsh peace treaty after his success at the battle of Mons-en-P�ev�ele; the peace exacted heavy reparations and humiliating penalties, and added the rich cloth cities of Lille and Douai, sites of major cloth fairs, to the royal territory. B�ethune, first of the Flemish cities to yield, was granted to Mahaut, Countess of Artois, whose two daughters, to secure her fidelity, were married to Philip's two sons. On Friday, October 13, 1307, hundreds of Knights Templar in France were simultaneously arrested by agents of Philip the Fair, to be later tortured into admitting heresy in the Order. The Knights Templar were a 200-year-old military order, supposedly answerable only to the Pope. But Philip used his influence over Clement V, who was largely his pawn, to disband the order and remove its ecclesiastical status and protection in order to plunder it. A modern historical view is that Philip seized the considerable Templar treasury and broke up the Templar monastic banking system. In 1314, he had the last Grand Master of the Templars, Jacques de Molay, burnt at the stake in Paris. According to legend, de Molay cursed both Philip and Clement V from the flames, saying that he would summon them before God's Tribunal within a year; as it turned out, both King and Pope died within the next year. In 1314, the daughters-in-law of Philip IV were accused of adultery, and their alleged lovers tortured, flayed and executed in what has come to be known as the Tour de Nesle Affair (French: Affaire de la tour de Nesle). Philip IV's rule signaled the decline of the papacy's power from its near complete authority. His palace located on the �Ile de la Cit�e is represented today by surviving sections of the Conciergerie. He died during a hunt when he was mauled by a wild boar and is buried in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Louis X. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Cokayne, George Edward, Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, extant, extinct, or dormant. Gloucester: A Sutton, 1982. Holloway, Naomi D, The Genealogy of Mary Wentworth, Who Became the Wife of William Brewster, Revised Edition, October 1969. LDS Film#1738313 item#5 Louda, Jiri, and Michael MacLagan, Heraldry of The Royal Families of Europe. New York: Clarkson Potter, 1981. Morris County Library 929.6094. Moriarty, G Andrews, Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III And Queen Philippa. Salt Lake: Mormon Pioneer Genealogical Society, 1985. LDS Film#0441438. nypl#ARF-86-2555. Paget, Gerald, The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. London: Charles Skilton Ltd, 1977. Nypl ARF+ 78-835. Previte-Orton, C. W., The Shorter Cambridge Medieval History, Cambridge: University Press, 1952. Chatham 940.1PRE. Redlich, Marcellus Donald R Von, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants. Order of the Crown of Charlemagne, 1941. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten Die Regierenden Hauser der Ubrigen Staaten Europas. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984. Tapsell, R. F., Monarchs, Rulers, Dynasties and Kingdoms of the World. New York: Facts on File Publications, 1983. Watney, Vernon James, The Wallop Family and their Ancestry, Oxford:John Johnson, 1928. LDS Film#1696491 items 6-9. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, David Faris, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, 7th Edition, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1992. Wurts, John S., Magna Charta: The Pedigrees of the Barons, Philadelphia, PA: Brookfield Publishing Co, 1942. RESEARCH NOTES: King of France [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p201, Weis AR7 #101, Paget HRHCharles p72, CP III p434] King of Navarre [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p232] 1285-1314: King of France [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p201, Weis AR7 #101] 1285-1314: King of Navarre, as Philip I [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p232]
b. Note:   BI160329
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES II #12, Louda RoyalFamEurope #65, Louda RoyalFamEurope #66, Moriarty Plantagenet p116, Moriarty Plantagenet p148, Paget HRHCharles p185, Paget HRHCharles p72, Weis AR7 #101] abt 1268 [Ref: Redlich CharlemagneDesc p64], place: [Ref: ES II #12, Weis AR7 #101], parents: [Ref: CMH p780, ES II #12, Louda RoyalFamEurope #65, Louda RoyalFamEurope #66, Moriarty Plantagenet p116, Paget HRHCharles p185, Paget HRHCharles p72, Redlich CharlemagneDesc p64, Watney WALLOP #203, Weis AR7 #101], father: [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p201], note: [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p187] Sources with Inaccurate Information: note: Phillip III and Maria of BRABENT [Ref: Wurts MCBarons p187]
c. Note:   DI160329
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES II #12, ES II #47, Moriarty Plantagenet p116, Moriarty Plantagenet p148, Paget HRHCharles p185, Paget HRHCharles p72, Redlich CharlemagneDesc p64, Watney WALLOP #203, Weis AR7 #101] 1314 [Ref: CMH p780, Louda RoyalFamEurope #65, Louda RoyalFamEurope #66, Tapsell Dynasties p201, Weis AR7 #45], place: [Ref: ES II #12]
d. Note:   XI160329
Note:   Sources for this Information: place: [Ref: ES II #12]


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