Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Vysheslav Of Kiev, Prince Of Novgorod: Birth: 0001. Death: 1010


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Jaroslav I Of Kiev: Birth: 978. Death: 20 Feb 1053-1054 in Vyshegorod

  2. Izyaslav Of Kiev, Prince Of Polotsk: Death: 1001

  3. Mstislav Of Kiev: Death: 1036

  4. Person Not Viewable

  5. Prdslawa Of Kiev: Death: Aft 1018


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Maria Dobrogneva Of Kiev: Birth: Bef 1012 in Kiev, Ukraine. Death: 1087

  2. Hilb : Death: 1015

  3. Borys : Death: 1015

  4. Sviatopolk : Death: 1019

  5. Vyseslav : Death: Abt 988

  6. Person Not Viewable

  7. Sviatoslav : Death: 1015

  8. Isiaslav : Death: 1001

  9. Mstislav : Death: 1034

  10. Soudislav : Death: 1063

  11. Veselvold : Death: 995


Family
Children:
  1. Dubroniega : Birth: Aft 1011. Death: 1087

  2. Person Not Viewable

  3. Sudislav Of Kiev, Prince Of Pskov: Death: 1063

  4. Person Not Viewable

  5. Person Not Viewable


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Gleb Of Kiev, Prince Of Murom: Death: 5 Sep 1015

  2. Boris Of Kiev, Prince Of Rostov: Death: 24 Jul 1015


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Svyatoslav Of Kiev, Prince Of Drevlyans: Death: Abt 1016


Notes
a. Note:   BIBLIOGRAPHY: Brandenburg, Erich, Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, Faksimile-Nachdruck von 1935 (Facsimile reproduction of 1935), mit Korrekturen und Erganzungen versehen von (with corrections and additions provided by) Manfred Dreiss und Lupold v. Lehsten. Neustadt an der Aisch:Verlag Degener, 1995. NYPL ATH (Charlemagne) 96-4768. Felch, William Farrand, Ancestry of Agatha, in Notes & Queries, London: John C Francis, 1894. Eighth series, vol 5 (Jan-Jun 1894) pp 421-23, 461-2, and vol 6 (Jul-Dec 1894) pp 2-3. Available at http://www.archive.org/download/ s8notesqueries05londuoft/s8notesqueries05londuoft.pdf and http://www.archive.org/download/s8notesqueries06londuoft/ s8notesqueries06londuoft.pdf Kalinkin, Andrew S., Wives and children of Vladimir. Posting to soc.genealogy.medieval (email list GEN-MEDIEVAL) on 8/2/1999-063855. Subject: Re: Dobronega Maria Wladimirowna Kijewskaja. Available at http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/1999-08/0933561535. Author address: kalinkin at cityline dot ru. Louda, Jiri, and Michael MacLagan, Heraldry of The Royal Families of Europe. New York: Clarkson Potter, 1981. Morris County Library 929.6094. Moriarty, G Andrews, Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III And Queen Philippa. Salt Lake: Mormon Pioneer Genealogical Society, 1985. LDS Film#0441438. nypl#ARF-86-2555. Previte-Orton, C. W., The Shorter Cambridge Medieval History, Cambridge: University Press, 1952. Chatham 940.1PRE. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. I.1: Die frankischen Konige und die Konige und Kaiser, Stammesherzoge, Kurfursten, Markgrafen und Herzoge des Heiligen Romischen Reiches Deutscher Nation. Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998. Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europaischen Staaten, New Series. II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten Die Regierenden Hauser der Ubrigen Staaten Europas. Marburg: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984. Tapsell, R. F., Monarchs, Rulers, Dynasties and Kingdoms of the World. New York: Facts on File Publications, 1983. Wagner, Anthony, Pedigree and Progress, Essays in the Genealogical Interpretation of History, London, Philmore, 1975. Rutgers Alex CS4.W33. Watney, Vernon James, The Wallop Family and their Ancestry, Oxford:John Johnson, 1928. LDS Film#1696491 items 6-9. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, David Faris, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, 7th Edition, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1992. RESEARCH NOTES: 978-1015: Prince of Kiev [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p272] Grand Prince of Kiev [Ref: Weis AR7 #241] 969: Grand Prince of Novogorad; 980: Grand Prince of Kiev [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p53] many pagan wives and concubines. listed are: (1) Adlaga, (2) Alava, (3) 989 Rognoda, dau of Roguar Princ of Polotz, d.1002, (4) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d.1002, (5) a Greek, widow of his brother Jaropolk, (6) n.n. a Bulgarian, (7) 989 Anna, dau of the Basilur Romanor, d.1011, (8) after 1011 N.N. dau of Count Kunza of Ohningen [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p53] written in the boyars, "If the Greek religion had not been the best, your grandmother Olga, the wisest of mortals, would not have adopted it". Accordingly, he descended into the Taurid, besieged and conquered Cherson, the last city of that region that remained subject to the Byzantian emperors, and sent an embassy to the Greek emperors Basil and Constantine, demanding their sister Anne in marriage, and threatening in case of refusal to march on Constantinople. It was a Cherson, that he received baptism and celebrated his marriage with Anne Porphyrogenita [Ref: Felch Agatha p461] The marital history of Vladimir is very complicated. You try to sort his wives as a series of consequent marriages, but this makes no sense for pre-Christian time. The sources clearly say that Vladimir lived and had children with several women at the same time. Here is list of Vladimir's wives from Nestor's chronicle (the order is how Nestor lists them and not necessary chronological). 1) Rogneda, daughter of Prince Rogwolod of Polotsk. She refused to marry him, so Vladimir took her by force, after conquerring Polotsk and murdering her father and two brothers. They had four sons: Izyaslav, Mstislav, Yaroslav and Vsevolod, and two daughters (they are not named, but later Nestor mentions Yaroslav's sister Predslava). The story of Rogneda's marriage is placed under year 980 in chronicle, but the chronology isn't very reliable and it is possible that Nestor combined events of several years in one. Later Nestor said that Rogneda's son Yaroslav died in 1054 aged 76, which makes him born ca.978. After Vladimir's conversion to Christianity and dissolution of his pagan marriages Rogneda became a noon and died in 1000 (not 1002). 2) "Greek woman", widow of his murdered (by him) brother Yaropolk. Their relationship was short and left one son, Swyatopolk. If you belive Nestor, she was already pregnant by Yaropolk when Vladimir took her, so Svyatopolk was "son of two fathers". This happened soon after Yaropolk's murder in 980. 3) "Czech woman" (unnamed in Nestor but called Adela in some later chronicles). She was mother of one son, Vysheslav. Vysheslav supposedly was Vladimir's eldest son, so she was probably the first of his wives. As we know that Vladimir spent several years before 980 in Scandinavia, it is not clear how he managed to find a czech woman there. So probably more reliable is information preserved by Tatischev (a 18th century historian, but he had in his possession ancient chronicles which didn't survive), that Vysheslav's mother was a scandinavian woman named Olava. This also fits information of sagas. called Vladimir's wife Allogia. 4) "Another czech woman" (probably called Malfrida). She was mother of Svyatoslav and Mstislav (again, probably an error). If this woman really was Malfrida, then she died in 1000. 5) "Bulgarian woman" (called Mililika in later sources). She was mother of Boris and Gleb. [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855] 988: Baptized a Christian [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p53] after Vladimir's conversion to Christianity he repudiated all his former wives and married princess Anna of Byzantium. The story of his conversion placed under year 988, but an exact date of this event is uncertain, so this is probalby why ES cautiously dates this marriage 987/989 [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855] The German marriage for Vladimir after death of Anna was proposed by N.Baumgarten (Le dernier marriage de saint Vladimir // Orientalia Christiana. Roma, 1930. Vol. XVIII, N61). I have no idea what was evidence for this marriage, but it seems generally accepted. Baumgarten attributed Maria-Dobronega, wife of Casimir, to this marriage, but this attribution accepted less universally. Alternative hypothesis makes Dobronega daughter of Yaroslav rather than Vladimir. [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855] OR "WLADIMIR""BASIL I (THE SAINT)""VASSILLI""THE GREAT""SWJATOSLAWITSCH"; GRAND PRINCE OF KIEV 977-1015; BAPTIZED A CHRISTIAN 988 (AS VASSILI) AT KHERSON, AND SOON "CONVERTED" THE ENTIRE COUNTRY, AFTER THE MANNER OF MEDIEVAL PRINCES; HAD MANY "PAGAN" WIVES AND CONCUBINES Vladimir I, Prince of Kiev - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Vladimir (in Ukrainian, Volodymyr) I, Prince of Kiev (Saint Vladimir) (c.958-1015) was the illegitimate son of Sviatoslav I and the grandson of Olga of Kiev. Ruler of Kiev from 980, he converted to Christianity in 988, reversing Sviatoslav's adherence to pagan tradition. Transferring his capital to Pereyaslavets in 969, Sviatoslav designated Vladimir ruler of Novgorod but gave Kiev to his legitimate son Yaropolk. After Sviatoslav's death (972), civil war erupted (976) between Yaropolk and his younger brother Oleg, ruler of Dereva. Vladimir fled (977) to Scandinavia, and Novgorod fell to Yaropolk. Returning in 978 with a large force of Varangian warriors, Vladimir recaptured Novgorod the following year. He slew prince Ragnvald of Polotsk and married his daughter Ragnilda, who was engaged to Yaropolk. Yaropolk fled as Vladimir besieged Kiev, but was killed (980) after surrendering to Vladimir, who now ruled all his father's domains. Though Christianity had won many converts since Olga's rule, Vladimir had remained pagan, taking several wives and erecting pagan statues and shrines. He continued his efforts to extend his territories, fighting in Galicia in 981, against the Yatvingians on the Baltic coast in 983, against the Bulgars in 985 and against the Byzantine Empire successfully in the Crimea in 987. In 988 he negotiated for the hand of the Byzantine emperor Basil II's sister, Anna. At Basil's insistence, Vladimir was baptized at Kherson, married Anna and gave up his other wives. Handing over Kherson to the Greeks, he destroyed pagan monuments and established many churches. Yaroslav, Vladimir's son by an earlier marriage, rebelled against him and refused to render him service or tribute for Novgorod. Vladimir prepared to take Novgorod by force, but died before the attack could begin." Vladimir succeeded his father through the process of fratricidal wars in which his brothers were slain. "He installed himself at Kiev (977), whence, by savage campaigns, he collected wives and tribute from most of the Dnieper Basin. Vladimir's chief fame rests on his forced conversion of the Russian Slavs to Christianity... During his reign, Kiev was repeatedly harassed by the Pechenegs; to hold them off, Vladimir built a sort of fortified line of new towns along the steppe frontier. At his death (1015) he left seven sons--of four or five different mothers--each ruling as prince in a portion of the Russian land; one of them, Yaroslav of Novgorod, was in open rebvellion, having refused to pay tribute to his father. Sviatopolk, who seized Kiev, promptly murdered three of his brothers, but was defeated in a four-year struggle by Yaroslav, who succeeded to the title of grand prince. Yaroslav, however, was forced to share the territory with another brother, Mstislav, who took the opportunity to move his residence from outlying Tmutorakan, beyond the Sea of Azov, to Chernigov, near Kiev. Not until Mstislav's death (1036) did Yaroslav "the Wise" venture to remove his seat from Novgorod to Kiev." "Vladimir...who had won the throne of Kiev by the murder of his older brother, was the last major European ruler to abandon paganism." He invited envoys from the Khazars (Jews), the Volga Bulgars (Muslims), Rome and Greece to "sell" their religious beliefs. But "Vladimir and his simple warriors (were) unable to make up their minds in this war of words." Therefore, they visited the temples of the Bulgars, the Romans and the Greeks, not bothering with a visit to the Khazars. They found the mosques unclean and western Catholic worship tolerable, but they were entralled with the spendor and beauty of the Greek places of worship. Hence, they embraced the Greek Orthodox religion. Vladimir was promised the hand of Anne, sister of the Byzantine emperor, in return for military aid and, despite some foot dragging by the emperor after the aid was provided, married the lady in 988. "In 990 Vladimir returned to Kieve with his imperial bride and a retinue of priests. Throughout his dominions the population was compulsorily baptized wholesale..." RC says he had many pagan wives and concubines of whom these are known: (1) Adlaga; (2) Olava; (3) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d. 1002; (5) a Greek, widow of his brother, Teropolk; (6) N.N.(27-36), a Bulgarian; md (7) 989, Anna, daughter of the Eastern Emperor, the Basilius Romanos, d. 10011; (8) N.N. (321-33), daughter of Kuno, Count of Ohningen. K. calls the latter Rogneda de Oehningen. One AF record says born about 962. According to my records, St. Vladimir had three daughters with Vladimirovna as name or part of name--all via different wives. Maybe he just liked the name. Maybe there are errors in the records. Sources - RC 143, 321, 361; Clarkson; A. Roots 241. 243; AF; Kraentzler 1162, 1170, 1171, 1172, 1233, 1603; Timetables of History; Through the Ages. Roots - St. Vladimir, Grand Prince of Kiev. Died 15 July 1015. Married after 1011, a daughter (died 14 Aug 1014) of Kuno, Count of Ohinigen, by Richilde, dau. of Otto I, the Great. Married also Rogneide, dau. of Rognald of Polotzk. RC - "The Great" of Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Grand prince of Novgorod and Kiev. Baptized a Christian, 988. K - Wladimir I le Grand et le Saint. Grand Duke of Novogorod, Kiew. "Le Grand et le Saint." Grand Prince of Kiev or Grand Duke of Kiev and Novgorod. Ruled 980-1015. "980. St.Vladimir becomes Prince of Kiev." Clarkson - Vladimir succeeded his father through the process of fratricidal wars in which his brothers were slain. "He installed himself at Kiev (977), whence, by savage campaigns, he collected wives and tribute from most of the Dnieper Basin. Vladimir's chief fame rests on his forced conversion of the Russian Slavs to Christianity...During his reign, Kiev was repeatedly harassed by the Pechenegs; to hold them off, Vladimir built a sort of fortified line of new towns along the steppe frontier. At his death (1015) he left seven sons--of four or five different mothers--each ruling as prince in a portion of the Russian land; one of them, Yaroslav of Novgorod, was in open rebvellion, having refused to pay tribute to his father. Sviatopolk, who seized Kiev, promptly murdered three of his brothers, but was defeated in a four-year struggle by Yaroslav, who succeeded to the title of grand prince. Yaroslav, however, was forced to share the territory with another brother, Mstislav, who took the opportunity to move his residence from outlying Tmutorakan, beyond the Sea of Azov, to Chernigov, near Kiev. Not until Mstislav's death (1036) did Yaroslav "the Wise" venture to remove his seat from Novgorod to Kiev." "Vladimir...who had won the throne of Kiev by the murder of his older brother, was the last major European ruler to abandon paganism." He invited envoys from the Khazars (Jews), the Volga Bulgars (Muslims), Rome and Greece to "sell" their religious beliefs. But "Vladimir and his simple warriors (were) unable to make up their minds in this war of words." Therefore, they visited the temples of the Bulgars, the Romans and the Greeks, not bothering with a visit to the Khazars. They found the mosques unclean and western Catholic worship tolerable, but they were entralled with the spendor and beauty of the Greek places of worship. Hence, they embraced the Greek Orthodox religion. Vladimir was promised the hand of Anne, sister of the Byzantine emperor, in return for military aid and, despite some foot dragging by the emperor after the aid was provided, married the lady in 988. "In 990 Vladimir returned to Kieve with his imperial bride and a retinue of priests. Throughout his dominions the population was compulsorily baptized wholesale..." RC says he had many pagan wives and concubines of whom these are known: (1) Adlaga; (2) Olava; (3) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d. 1002; (5) a Greek, widow of his brother, Teropolk; (6) N.N.(27-36), a Bulgarian; md (7) 989, Anna, daughter of the Eastern Emperor, the Basilius Romanos, d. 10011; (8) N.N. (321-33), daughter of Kuno, Count of Ohningen. K. calls the latter Rogneda de Oehningen. One AF record says born about 962. According to my records, St. Vladimir had three daughters with Vladimirovna as name or part of name--all via different wives. Maybe he just liked the name. Maybe there are errors in the records.
b. Note:   BI112490
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: abt 955 [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p221, Moriarty Plantagenet p53] abt 956 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #853], parents: [Ref: ES II #128], father: [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p221, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Tapsell Dynasties p272, Watney WALLOP #853, Weis AR7 #241] Sources with Inaccurate Information: mother: Maloucha (#11302) [Ref: Weis AR7 #241] Maloucha (#11302), concubine [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p221, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Watney WALLOP #853]
c. Note:   DI112490
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES I.1 #9, ES II #127, ES II #128, Moriarty Plantagenet p221, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Weis AR7 #241] 1015 [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p272] abt 1015 [Ref: Watney WALLOP #853], place: [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Watney WALLOP #853]
d. Note:   NF71922
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: several years before 980 [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855], child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855]
e. Note:   NF14297
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: abt 980, soon after Yaropolk's murder [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855] second marriage of Griechen [Ref: Felch Agatha p461] second marriage of both [Ref: ES II #128]
f. Note:   NF71923
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: [Ref: ES II #127, ES II #128] 980, as first marriage of Vladimir listed by Nestor [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855], child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855, ES II #128, Weis AR7 #241]
g. Note:   NF71593
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: 987/89 third marriage of Vladimir [Ref: ES II #128] abt 988 [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855], names: [Ref: CMH p256] Sources with Inaccurate Information: child: Jaroslov I Grand Prince of Kiev (#10896) [Ref: Felch Agatha p422, Watney WALLOP #853]
h. Note:   NF71594
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: after 1011 [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Weis AR7 #241] nach 1011 [Ref: ES I.1 #9, ES II #128], names: St. Vladimir Grand Prince Of Kiev & dau Kuno Of Ohningen [Ref: Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Weis AR7 #241] Vladimir & German woman [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855] Wladimir & dau Gf Kono (v Ohningen) [Ref: Brandenburg 1995 p92, ES I.1 #9, ES II #128], child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Weis AR7 #241]
i. Note:   NF71595
Note:   Sources for this Information: names: [Ref: ES I.1 #87B, Moriarty Plantagenet p97], child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855, ES I.1 #87B (with corr in I.3), ES II #128, Moriarty Plantagenet p173, Moriarty Plantagenet p53, Moriarty Plantagenet p98] Sources with Inaccurate Information: child: Sviatopolk I Prince of Kiev (#15237) [Ref: Tapsell Dynasties p272]
j. Note:   NF71592
Note:   Sources for this Information: child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855]
k. Note:   NF29351
Note:   Sources for this Information: child: [Ref: Andrew Kalinkin SGM 8/2/1999-063855]


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