Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William De Meschines: Birth: Abt 1093 in Gernon Castle, , Normandy, France. Death: 1130

  2. Agnes De Meschines: Birth: 1095 in Bayeux, Normandy, France.

  3. Alice (Adeliza) De Meschines: Birth: 1096 in Gernons Castle, Normandy. Death: 1128 in Hreford, England

  4. Ranulph "De Gernon" De Meschines: Birth: 1099 in Gernon Castle, Normandy, France. Death: Abt 16 Dec 1153 in England


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Randulph De Germon Meschines: Birth: 1100. Death: 16 Dec 1153


Sources
1. Title:   From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
2. Title:   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
3. Title:   Wikipedia

Notes
a. Note:   NI107080
Note:   Ranulph was the 4th Earl of Chester, lord of Cumberland, viscount of Bayeux [the Bessin] in Normandy. He became earl of Chester in 1120 following the death of his first cousin, Richard d'Avranches, earl of Chester, who died without heirs in the sinking of the White Ship on November 25, 1120. He appears to have surrendered the lordship of Cumberland, which he had obtained shortly before from Henry I, on his accession as earl of Chester. In 1124, he was commander of the royal forces in Normandy. The sobriquet, "le Meschin" means "the Young," from the Latin "mischinus," French "meschin" [le jeune]. He is also called Briquessart from Briquessart in the commune of Livry, where the earthworks of his castle are still visible. Ranulph III le Meschin, de Briquessart, d. c 1129, buried St Werburg's, Chester, lord of Cumberland, vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy, Earl of Chester in 1120, following the death of his first cousin Hugh d'Avranches, Earl of Chester; in 1124 commander of the Royal Forces in Normandy; m. probably c 1098 Lucy, living 1130, widow susscessively, of Ives Taillebois and Roger Fitz Gerold. [Ancestral Roots] RANULPH LE MESCHIN (a), styled, also, "DE BRIQUESSART," VICOMTE DE BAYEUX in Normandy, son and heir of Ranulph, VICOMTE DE BAYEUX, by Margaret, sister of Hugh (D'AVRANCHES), EARL OF CHESTER, being thus 1st cousin and heir to the last Earl (whom he succeeded as VICOMTE D'AVRANCHES) &C.) in Normandy), obtained, after the Earl's death in 1120, the grant of the county palatine of Chester becoming thereby EARL OF CHESTER. He appears thereupon to have surrendered the Lordship of the great district of Cumberland, which he had acquired, shortly before, from Henry I. In 1124 he was Commander of the Royal forces in Normandy. He married Lucy, widow of Roger FITZ-GEROLD (by whom she was mother of William de Roumare, afterwards Earl of Lincoln). He died 17 or 27 January 1128/9, and was buried at St. Werburg's, Chester. The Countess Lucy confirmed, as his widow, the grant of the Manor of Spalding to the monks of that place (f). [Complete Peerage III:166, XIV:170, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] (a) ie. "The young" from the Latin "Mischinus"; French "Meschin" (Le Jeune). "Apud Francos mediae aetatis scriptores sumitur vox "Meschin" pro adolescente et juvenculo." Ducange. (f) She paid 500 marks to King Henry in 1130 for license to remain unmarried for 5 years. Note - The name should be "le" instead of "de" Meschin because "de" implies a place that the person was from, which is not the case here. Ranulf or Randle de Meschines, surnamed de Bricasard, Viscount Bayeux, in Normandy, (son of Ralph de Meschines, by Maud, his wife, co-heir of her brother, Hugh Lupus, the celebrated Earl of Chester), was given by King Henry I the Earldom of Chester, at the decease of his 1st cousin, Richard de Abrincis, 2nd Earl of Chester, of that family, without issue. By some historians, this nobleman is styled Earl of Carlisle, from residing in that city; and they further state that he came over in the train of the Conqueror, assisted in the subjugation of England, and shared, of course, in the spoil of conquest. He was lord of Cumberland and Carlisle, by descent from his father, but having enfeoffed his two brothers, William, of Coupland, and Geffrey, of Gillesland, in a large portion thereof, he exchanged the Earldom of Cumberland for that of Chester, on condition that those whom he had settled there should hold their lands of the king, in capite. His lordship m. Lucia, widow of Roger de Romara, Earl of Lincoln, and dau. of Algar, the Saxon, Earl of Mercia, and had issue, Ranulph, his successor; William, styled Earl of Cambridge, but of his issue nothing in known; Adeliza, m. to Richard Fitz-Gilbert, ancestor of the old Earls of Clare; and Agnes, m. to Robert de Grentemaisnil. The earl d. in 1128 and was s. by his elder son, Ranulph de Meschines. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages,. Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 365, Meschines, Earls of Chester] EARL OF CHESTER; VISCOUNT OF BAYEUX; COMMANDER OF ROYAL FORCES IN NORMANDY "DE MESCHINES"; EARL OF CHESTER ------------------- Ranulph III de Meschin, de Briquessare, d. c 1129, buried St Werburg's, Chester, lord of Cumberland, vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy, Earl of Chester in 1120, following the death of his first counsin Hugh d'Avranches, Earl of Chester; in 1124 commander of the Royal Forces in Normandy; m. probably c 1098 Lucy, living 1130, widdow successively, of Ives Taillebois and Roger FitzGerold. [Ancestral Roots] ___________________ EARLDOM OF CHESTER (IV,1) Ranulph le Meschin (a), styled, also "De Briquessart," Vicomte De Bayeux in Normandy, son and heir of Ranulph, Vicomte De Bayeux, by Margaret, sister of Hugh (d'Avranches), Earl of Chester, being thus 1st counsin and heir to the last Earl (whom he succeeded as Vicomte d'Avranches & C. in Normandy), obtained, after the Earl's death in 1120, the grant of the county palatine of Chester becoming thereby Earl of Chester. He appears thereupon to have surrendered the Lordship of the great district of Cumberland, which he had acquired, shortly before, from Henry I. In 1124 he was Commander of the Royal forces in Normandy. He married Lucy, widow of Roger FitzGerold (by whom she was mother of William de Roumare, afterwards Earl of Lincoln). He died 17 or 27 January 1128/9, and was buried at St Werburg's, Chester. The Countess Lucy confirmed, as his widow, the grant of the Manor of Spalding to the monks of that place (f). [Complete Peerage III:166, XIV:170, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)[ (a) ie. "The young" from the Latin "Mischinus"; French "Meschin" (Le Jeune). "Apud Francos mediae aetatis scriptores sumitur vox "Meschin" pro adolescente et juvenculo." Ducange. (f) She paid 500 marks to King Henry in 1130 for license to remain unmarried for 5 years. _________________ Ranulf or Randle de Meschines, surnames de Bricasard, Viscount Bayeus, in Normandy, (son of Ralph de Meschines, by Maud, his wife, co-heir of her brother, Hugh Lupus, the celebrated Earl of Chester), was given by King Henry I the Earldom of Chester, at the decease of his 1st cousin, Richard de Abrincis, 2nd Earl of Chester, of that family, without issue. By some historians, this nobleman is styled Earl of Carlisle, from residing in that city; and they further state that he came over in the train of the Conqueror, assisted in the subjugation of England, and shared, or course, in the spoil of conquest. He was lord of Cumberland and Carlisle, by descent from his father, but having enfeoffed his two brothers, William of Coupland, and Geffrey of Gillesland, in a large portion thereof, he exchanged the Earldom of Cumberland for that of Chester, on condition that those whom he had settled there should hold their lands of the king, in capite. His lordship m. Lucia, widow of Roger de Romara, Early of Lincoln, and dau. of Algar, the Saxon, Earl of Mercia, and had issue, Ranulph, his successor; William, styled Earl of Cambridge, but of his issue nothing is known; Adeliza, m. to Richard FitzGilbert, ancestor of the old Earls of Clare; and Agnes, m. to Robert de Grentemaisnil. The earl d. in 1128 and was s. by his elder son, Ranulph de Meschines. [Sir Benard Burke, "Dormant and Extinct Peerages", Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 365, Meschines, Earls of Chester] From Post-em Display of Curt_Hofemann@yahoo.com: Ranulph le Meschin , 1st Earl of Chester To Richard succeeded in the Earldom of Chester, Ranulph, sirnamed _de Bricasard_, as he is called by some, and by others, _Ranulph de M�cenis_) Sisters Son to Earl Hugh, and his next Her in Blood, by the death of Earl Richard, without issue. But I cannot say, he enjoyed his Earldom by vertue of that his descent; for I find, that having wedded Lucia, Sister to those Noble Brothers, Edwyne and Morkar (of whom I have made mention under the Titles Mercia and Northumberland) he not only gave up those Lands of her Inheritance, in lieu thereof, but a large sum of Money besides, which was not totally paid of a good while after. For it appears, that in 5 Steph. Ranulph, Earl of Chester, (Son to this Ranulph) is certified, to be indebted to the King in a thousand pounds, _De debito Patris sui, pro terr�a Hugonis Comitis_. This Ranulph, before he thus enjoyed the Earldom of Chester, was Earl of Cumberland; for so I find him stiled in that Confirmation made by King William, of the Mannor of Wederhale, to the Abbey of S. Maries at York (which afterwards became a Cell to that Monastery). By some of our Historians he is called Earl of Carlisle (by reason of his residence there, that being the cheif City of Umberland,) who farther report of him, that he came over with William, Duke of Normandy and gave him effectual assistance in his Conquest of England; as also, that he began the building of the City of Carlisle, and granted divers Immunities to the Inhabitants thereof. And moreover, that King William in his return from Scotland discerning Carlisle to be so Royal a Town, took it from him, and gave him this of Chester in its stead. It is likewise recorded of this Ranulph; that being a person of more than ordinary valor, King William the Conqueror gave him that vast Mountainous Country, called Stanemore, situate on the skirts of Yorkshire and Westmerland, then possessed by Aliens, upon condition, he could recover it out of their hands; and that, by his singular courage, having beaten out those Foreigners, he Enfeoffed his two Brothers in a large portion thereof, viz. William of Coupland, and Geffrey of Gillesland; and a multitude of others within the County of Cumberland, amongst which, one Waltheof, a Man of note in that age, as also the Morvills, and sundry persons in Anandale, whose estates, the King at his request confirmed. But the Earldom, id est, of Cumberland, he retained to himself, with all Royalty and Dominion, for a long time, with as much power and freedom, as if there had been another King in those parts. And that after this, the King proposing to him the waging War with the Marchers in Cheshire, who had invaded a great part of the Countrey; he undertaking the work, drove them out. Whereupon he gave him that whole Province, and made him Count Palatine of it, as he had Earl Hugh. So that he thenceforth left the Earldom of Cumberland, on condition, that those whom he had Enfeoffed there, should hold their Lands of the King in Capite, and setled himself in Cheshire. This Earl was Founder of the Abbey at Kaldra in Cumberland; and translated the Bones of his Uncle Earl Hugh from the Churchyard, into the Chapter-House at Chester: at which time he gave to the Monks of the Abbey of S. Werburg there, the Lordship of Uptune in Cheshire. He gave also to the Abbey of S. Maries at York, the Church of S. Michael; and the Church of S. Laurence, belonging to his Castle at Appleby (in Westmerland). And departing this life in the year One thousand one hundred twenty nine (29 H. 1.) was buried in the Abbey of S. Werburg before mentioned; leaving Issue by Lucia his Wife, Daughter to Algar, sometime Earl of Mercia (as I have elswhere shewed) two Sons, viz. Ranulph and William; and two Daughters, Alice, Wife to Richard Fitz-Gilbert, Ancestor of the Earls of Clare, and Agnes of Robert de Grent-Maisnil. Which Lucia, surviving him, in 5 Steph. paid to the King Cclxvi l. xiii s. iiii d. for Livery of her Fathers Lands; and likewise Five Hundred marks fine, to the end, she might not be compelled to marry again within the space of five years. To the Nuns of Stikesmould (in Lincolnshire) she have (sic: gave) Seven Carucates, and Four Ox-gangs of Land, lying in Huntendon. And confirmed to the Priory of Spalding in the same County, the Mannor of Spalding, which Ivo Talboys, her first Husband, had formerly given to the Monks of S. Nicholas at Angiers in France; unto which Monastery, this of Spalding, was a Cell, where she afterwards had Sepulture. [Ref: Dugdale, Baronage of England, 1675, reprinted by Georg Olms Verlag, Hildesheim & New York, 1977; Earls of Chester, pp. 36-37] "16. By the same Frith, more within the land, standeth Drumbough Castle, belonging of later time to the Lords of Dacre, a station in times past of the Romans. Some will have it to have beene Exploratorum Castra , notwithstanding the distance utterly countrouleth [excludes] it. There was also an other station of the Romans beside it, which now beeing changed into a new name is called Burgh upon Sands, whence the territorie adjoyning is named the Baronie of Burgh, the which Richard Meschines Lord of Cumberland gave unto Robert de Trivers, but from him it came to the Morvills..." From: Britain, or, a Chorographicall Description of the most flourishing Kingdomes, England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden (1607), translated from the Latin by Philemon Holland (1610), Chapter on Cumberland, quoted in A Vision of Britain Through Time website, URL: http://vision.edina.ac.uk/text/chap_page.jsp?t_id=Camden&c_id=28&p_id= 951 [date accessed: 6/30/07]. "The barony of Burgh (fn. 4) was given by Earl Ranulph [le Meschins] to Robert D'Estrivers, from whose family it passed by successive heirs female to the families of Morvill, Multon, Dacre, and Howard. 4 This barony comprises the parishes of Burgh, Bowness, Aikton, Thursby, Orton, KirkBampton, Beaumont, Kirk-Andrews on Eden, and Grinsdale." From: 'General history: Baronies', Magna Britannia: volume 4: Cumberland (1816), pp. LIII-LV. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=50664. Date accessed: 01 July 2007. "Earldom of Carlisle.-Ranulph de Meschines had the Earldom of Carlisle (fn. 9) given him by William the Conqueror. His son of the same name, who was also Earl of Chester, surrendered the Earldom of Carlisle to King Henry I. 9 See Vincent. Dugdale speaks of Ranulph as Earl of Cumberland." From: 'General history: Nobility of the county', Magna Britannia: volume 4: Cumberland (1816), pp. LV-LXIV. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50665 Date accessed: 31 December 2010. Note: Ranulph III de Meschin, de Briquessare, d. c 1129, buried St Werburg's, Chester, lord of Cumberland, vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy, Earl of Chester in 1120, following the death of his first counsin Hugh d'Avranches, Earl of Chester; in 1124 commander of the Royal Forces in Normandy; m. probably c 1098 Lucy, living 1130, widdow successively, of Ives Taillebois and Roger FitzGerold. [Ancestral Roots] ___________________ EARLDOM OF CHESTER (IV,1) Ranulph le Meschin (a), styled, also "De Briquessart," Vicomte De Bayeux in Normandy, son and heir of Ranulph, Vicomte De Bayeux, by Margaret, sister of Hugh (d'Avranches), Earl of Chester, being thus 1st counsin and heir to the last Earl (whom he succeeded as Vicomte d'Avranches & C. in Normandy), obtained, after the Earl's death in 1120, the grant of the county palatine of Chester becoming thereby Earl of Chester. He appears thereupon to have surrendered the Lordship of the great district of Cumberland, which he had acquired, shortly before, from Henry I. In 1124 he was Commander of the Royal forces in Normandy. He married Lucy, widow of Roger FitzGerold (by whom she was mother of William de Roumare, afterwards Earl of Lincoln). He died 17 or 27 January 1128/9, and was buried at St Werburg's, Chester. The Countess Lucy confirmed, as his widow, the grant of the Manor of Spalding to the monks of that place (f). [Complete Peerage III:166, XIV:170, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)[ (a) ie. "The young" from the Latin "Mischinus"; French "Meschin" (Le Jeune). "Apud Francos mediae aetatis scriptores sumitur vox "Meschin" pro adolescente et juvenculo." Ducange. (f) She paid 500 marks to King Henry in 1130 for license to remain unmarried for 5 years. _________________ Ranulf or Randle de Meschines, surnames de Bricasard, Viscount Bayeus, in Normandy, (son of Ralph de Meschines, by Maud, his wife, co-heir of her brother, Hugh Lupus, the celebrated Earl of Chester), was given by King Henry I the Earldom of Chester, at the decease of his 1st cousin, Richard de Abrincis, 2nd Earl of Chester, of that family, without issue. By some historians, this nobleman is styled Earl of Carlisle, from residing in that city; and they further state that he came over in the train of the Conqueror, assisted in the subjugation of England, and shared, or course, in the spoil of conquest. He was lord of Cumberland and Carlisle, by descent from his father, but having enfeoffed his two brothers, William of Coupland, and Geffrey of Gillesland, in a large portion thereof, he exchanged the Earldom of Cumberland for that of Chester, on condition that those whom he had settled there should hold their lands of the king, in capite. His lordship m. Lucia, widow of Roger de Romara, Early of Lincoln, and dau. of Algar, the Saxon, Earl of Mercia, and had issue, Ranulph, his successor; William, styled Earl of Cambridge, but of his issue nothing is known; Adeliza, m. to Richard FitzGilbert, ancestor of the old Earls of Clare; and Agnes, m. to Robert de Grentemaisnil. The earl d. in 1128 and was s. by his elder son, Ranulph de Meschines. [Sir Benard Burke, "Dormant and Extinct Peerages", Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 365, Meschines, Earls of Chester] From Post-em Display of Curt_Hofemann@yahoo.com: Ranulph le Meschin , 1st Earl of Chester To Richard succeeded in the Earldom of Chester, Ranulph, sirnamed _de Bricasard_, as he is called by some, and by others, _Ranulph de M�cenis_) Sisters Son to Earl Hugh, and his next Her in Blood, by the death of Earl Richard, without issue. But I cannot say, he enjoyed his Earldom by vertue of that his descent; for I find, that having wedded Lucia, Sister to those Noble Brothers, Edwyne and Morkar (of whom I have made mention under the Titles Mercia and Northumberland) he not only gave up those Lands of her Inheritance, in lieu thereof, but a large sum of Money besides, which was not totally paid of a good while after. For it appears, that in 5 Steph. Ranulph, Earl of Chester, (Son to this Ranulph) is certified, to be indebted to the King in a thousand pounds, _De debito Patris sui, pro terr�a Hugonis Comitis_. This Ranulph, before he thus enjoyed the Earldom of Chester, was Earl of Cumberland; for so I find him stiled in that Confirmation made by King William, of the Mannor of Wederhale, to the Abbey of S. Maries at York (which afterwards became a Cell to that Monastery). By some of our Historians he is called Earl of Carlisle (by reason of his residence there, that being the cheif City of Umberland,) who farther report of him, that he came over with William, Duke of Normandy and gave him effectual assistance in his Conquest of England; as also, that he began the building of the City of Carlisle, and granted divers Immunities to the Inhabitants thereof. And moreover, that King William in his return from Scotland discerning Carlisle to be so Royal a Town, took it from him, and gave him this of Chester in its stead. It is likewise recorded of this Ranulph; that being a person of more than ordinary valor, King William the Conqueror gave him that vast Mountainous Country, called Stanemore, situate on the skirts of Yorkshire and Westmerland, then possessed by Aliens, upon condition, he could recover it out of their hands; and that, by his singular courage, having beaten out those Foreigners, he Enfeoffed his two Brothers in a large portion thereof, viz. William of Coupland, and Geffrey of Gillesland; and a multitude of others within the County of Cumberland, amongst which, one Waltheof, a Man of note in that age, as also the Morvills, and sundry persons in Anandale, whose estates, the King at his request confirmed. But the Earldom, id est, of Cumberland, he retained to himself, with all Royalty and Dominion, for a long time, with as much power and freedom, as if there had been another King in those parts. And that after this, the King proposing to him the waging War with the Marchers in Cheshire, who had invaded a great part of the Countrey; he undertaking the work, drove them out. Whereupon he gave him that whole Province, and made him Count Palatine of it, as he had Earl Hugh. So that he thenceforth left the Earldom of Cumberland, on condition, that those whom he had Enfeoffed there, should hold their Lands of the King in Capite, and setled himself in Cheshire. This Earl was Founder of the Abbey at Kaldra in Cumberland; and translated the Bones of his Uncle Earl Hugh from the Churchyard, into the Chapter-House at Chester: at which time he gave to the Monks of the Abbey of S. Werburg there, the Lordship of Uptune in Cheshire. He gave also to the Abbey of S. Maries at York, the Church of S. Michael; and the Church of S. Laurence, belonging to his Castle at Appleby (in Westmerland). And departing this life in the year One thousand one hundred twenty nine (29 H. 1.) was buried in the Abbey of S. Werburg before mentioned; leaving Issue by Lucia his Wife, Daughter to Algar, sometime Earl of Mercia (as I have elswhere shewed) two Sons, viz. Ranulph and William; and two Daughters, Alice, Wife to Richard Fitz-Gilbert, Ancestor of the Earls of Clare, and Agnes of Robert de Grent-Maisnil. Which Lucia, surviving him, in 5 Steph. paid to the King Cclxvi l. xiii s. iiii d. for Livery of her Fathers Lands; and likewise Five Hundred marks fine, to the end, she might not be compelled to marry again within the space of five years. To the Nuns of Stikesmould (in Lincolnshire) she have (sic: gave) Seven Carucates, and Four Ox-gangs of Land, lying in Huntendon. And confirmed to the Priory of Spalding in the same County, the Mannor of Spalding, which Ivo Talboys, her first Husband, had formerly given to the Monks of S. Nicholas at Angiers in France; unto which Monastery, this of Spalding, was a Cell, where she afterwards had Sepulture. [Ref: Dugdale, Baronage of England, 1675, reprinted by Georg Olms Verlag, Hildesheim & New York, 1977; Earls of Chester, pp. 36-37] "16. By the same Frith, more within the land, standeth Drumbough Castle, belonging of later time to the Lords of Dacre, a station in times past of the Romans. Some will have it to have beene Exploratorum Castra , notwithstanding the distance utterly countrouleth [excludes] it. There was also an other station of the Romans beside it, which now beeing changed into a new name is called Burgh upon Sands, whence the territorie adjoyning is named the Baronie of Burgh, the which Richard Meschines Lord of Cumberland gave unto Robert de Trivers, but from him it came to the Morvills..." From: Britain, or, a Chorographicall Description of the most flourishing Kingdomes, England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden (1607), translated from the Latin by Philemon Holland (1610), Chapter on Cumberland, quoted in A Vision of Britain Through Time website, URL: h t t p://vision.edina.ac.uk/text/chap_page.jsp?t_id=Camden&c_id=28&p_id=951 [date accessed: 6/30/07]. "The barony of Burgh (fn. 4) was given by Earl Ranulph [le Meschins] to Robert D'Estrivers, from whose family it passed by successive heirs female to the families of Morvill, Multon, Dacre, and Howard. 4 This barony comprises the parishes of Burgh, Bowness, Aikton, Thursby, Orton, KirkBampton, Beaumont, Kirk-Andrews on Eden, and Grinsdale." From: 'General history: Baronies', Magna Britannia: volume 4: Cumberland (1816), pp. LIII-LV. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=50664.
b. Note:   BI107080
Note:   Sources for this Information: parents: [Ref: CP III p166, Sanders Baronies p32, Watney WALLOP #230, Weis AR7 #132A], father: [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p5]
c. Note:   DI107080
Note:   Sources for this Information: date: 1-1128/29 [Ref: Holloway WENTWORTH p5] 17 or 27 Jan 1128/9 [Ref: CP III p166 (with corr in XIV p170)] abt 1129 [Ref: CP III p30, Sanders Baronies p18, Sanders Baronies p32, Wagner PedigreeProgress #48, Watney WALLOP #230, Weis AR7 #132A]
d. Note:   XI107080
Note:   Sources for this Information: place: [Ref: CP III p166, Weis AR7 #132A]


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