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a. Continued:   Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Kristi, woodie75@comcast.net name and dates
  http://web.mac.com/charness1/Michael_Ernst_Harness,_Sr./Tulpehocken.html The Tulpehocken Settlement. Most researchers believe that Michael Ernst Harness, Sr. and his wife, Elizabeth, lived in the Tulpehocken settlement for 12 to 13 years. It is believed that 7 of the couple’s 13 children (Michael, Jr., Elizabeth, Conrad, Barbara Rebecca, Jacob (the first son who had that name), John and Adam) were all born there. Family tradition has it that in 1738 while a resident of Tulpehocken Settlement township , Michael Ernst Harness heard about a valley along the South Branch of the Potomac river (known then by its Indian name, the Wappocomo), on the Virginia colony’s rugged western frontier. Four men had been sent out from Winchester, Virginia by British Lord Fairfax in 1737. Lord Fairfax had inherited a large amount of land in that rugged unexplored wilderness and he came to America expressly to try and get a better idea of what his inheritance was like and what he might do with it to make some money. So he sent the four men to scout out the area.
  Ibid. Benjamin F. Van Meter, in his book “Genealogies and Sketches of Some Old Families Who Have Taken A Prominent Part In the Development of Virginia and Kentucky,” said of the Harness family on the South Branch in the mid 1700’s: “The Harness family was not only enterprising, but a fearless, daring and reckless family. Three of Michael’s sons were scalped by the Indians, and the family had many reckless adventures and narrow escapes.”
  Ibid. While a complete record of the number of settlers killed by Indians in Hampshire County and surrounding areas of the frontier during this period does not exist, a conservative estimate by some historians is 100, with an additional number of settlers who were carried into captivity, some never to return. The family of Michael Ernst Harness, Sr. was not spared. In1757 his son Conrad, his wife and infant daughter along with son Leonard’s infant daughter were scalped and killed by marauding Indians. In 1758-59 his son, 21 year old Adam, apparently suffered the same fate, and in 1763 son Michael, Jr. was scalped and killed. Other neighboring families suffered in even more horrific numbers


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