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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Semore York: Birth: ABT 1727 in , Chester, Pennsylvania. Death: 8 Feb 1783 in Sandy Creek, Randolph, North Carolina

  2. Thomas York: Birth: ABT 1729 in Sandy Creek, Orange, North Carolina. Death: Apr 1790 in , Randolph, North Carolina

  3. Henry York: Birth: 6 Aug 1732 in , Yorkshire, England. Death: ABT 1817 in , Wilkes, North Carolina

  4. Joseph York: Birth: ABT 1734 in Sandy Creek, Orange, North Carolina. Death: 8 Oct 1809 in Madison District, Mississippi Territory, Alabama

  5. Elizabeth Ann York: Birth: 1735 in , , Virginia. Death: AFT 1800 in , , North Carolina

  6. John York: Birth: ABT 1740 in of, Orange, North Carolina. Death: ABT 1778 in , Randolph, North Carolina


Family
Marriage:
Notes
a. Note:   e chronologically born in: 1727 -- Chester Co, PA 1729 -- Sandy Creek, Randolph Co, NC 1732 -- Yorkshire, England 1734 -- Sandy Creek, Orange Co, NC 1735 -- Virginia 1740 -- Orange or Randolph Co, NC It seems highly unlikely that they would go back to England and move around so much within the colonies??? http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/41672699/person/19659879563 -- suggests that Aaron York b. 1738 in Pipe Creek Settlement, Carroll Co, MD was also a son of Jeremiah York, Jr. That would mean yet another move???
Jim York -- fireball@comcast.net -- my male York line follows from Jeremiah York [1683-c1664] to Semore York [c1727-1783] to Isaac York [1766-1806] to Jabez York [1800-1879] to Jesse Julian York [1830-1862] to Wesley Clarkson York [1859-1915] to James Earl York [Sr.] [1893-1982] to James Earl York [Jr] [1917-living] to James Earl York [III] [myself, 1950-living].
Jackie Ramsey York, 22251 Carlton's Dell Rd., Danville, IL 61834; 217) 446-2714. Research of Janet Burton, Yorkbur@aol.com. The Yorks of 1700s and 1800s by Douglas A. Colbert, 196 Esmeyer Dr., San Rafael, CA 94903. Shawn C. Baker: scbaker@mail.com M. D. Baker: mdbaker@bnl.gov (may be in England). Stan and Betty Rasmussen: stanbr@cyberhighway.net ETYork: vcyork@gru.net Birth & christening records of Olney, Buckingham, England. May also have had sons Jeremiah and Aaron. These two names are mentioned as Executor and Witness to the will of Jeremiah's son John York's will in 1792. Chester Co, PA tax lists 1715-1753 on microfilm through LDS library: Jeremiah York 1718, 1719, 1721, 1724, 1725, 1727, 1729. Solomon Alred 1724, 1730. Believed to have moved south to Pipe Creek Settlement, MD around 1730. Rita D. Brown, 5910 Beechwood Ave, Ivanhoe, CA 93235: rita@psnw.com World Family Tree CD had Memrey Alldridge as a wife of this Jeremiah York.
I recently found two ancestry lines for Jeremiah York b. 1701. Has this line been proved back to England? Here are the two lines: 1.Jeremiah York b. abt 1701 England ? d. 1784 md abt 1726 to Sarah Seymour. Their children: John, Seymour, Henry, Thomas, Joseph, James, Aaron, William. 2.Jeremiah's parents: William York b. 1654 d. 18 Sep 1704 md Elizabeth _______ 3. William York md Elizabeth ________ by 1669, (2) Ann by 9 Mar 1673, (3) Mary d. by 10 Apr 1726. Only lists children by Mary: William, Oliver, John, George, James. 4. Edward md unknown 1 child - #3 listed above.
1. Jeremiah York b. 1701 Yorkshire, England 2. Jeremiah York Sr. b. 1657 Olney, Buckingham, England md before 1732 Sarah Seymour (f. John m. Johanna) 3. Richard York Jr. b. 1635 Olney, Buckingham, England md. Rebecca Mumford 4. Richard York Sr. b. 1620 Olney, Buckingham, England md. 1 Oct 1639 Woughton on the Green, Buckingham, England to Susan Starling. Does anyone know if either of these is correct and is there documentation to prove it? If there is could you please let me know what it is. Thank you. I will greatly appreciate any help anyone can give me. Carol Robbins
Suzanne Bryant: Suzybryant@aol.com suggests that Jeremiah York had 12 children: Semore, David, Jeremiah III, John, Henry, Joseph, Thomas, Sarah, James, Aaron, William, Bartholomew.
Jim York -- fireball@comcast.net -- York’s of Olney and Surrounding Parishes, Buckinghamshire, England, 1665-1812
Jeremiah York in Olney, England and Randolph County, North Carolina
The parish records of Olney show a Jeremiah Yorke christened on 09 SEP 1683. As argued below, he may be the Jeremiah York who is progenitor of the York’s of Randolph County. His parents were Richard Yorke and Ann Seymour, who were married on 14 NOV 1682. His siblings were Mary, ch. 01 SEP 1684 and buried 29 Mar 1700, Richard, ch. 02 MAY 1686, Ann, ch. 13 JAN 1688/9, and Elizabeth, ch. 30 APR 1693.
Jeremiah York’s father Richard was buried 6 MAR 1695/6, when Jeremiah, the oldest child, was 12 and the youngest child was 2. Although Jeremiah would have emigrated before 1718 (age 34, when he was in West Nottingham, PA), at least his sister Elizabeth remained, married, and had a child in 1721 in Olney. His mother possibly reached out to extended family of the Seymour’s and York’s elsewhere in the region to help raise her young family, perhaps providing fatherless Jeremiah with a strong link to the Seymour family. Since there is no record of his brother Richard associated with Jeremiah in America, he may have stayed in England (there is no more record of him in Olney, but there are several marriages of Richard York’s elsewhere in England that could fit).
Jeremiah’s maternal grandparents were possibly Jeremiah Seymour (a glovemaker, burial 21 Sep 1683) and Ann Seymour (widow, buried 8 Oct 1694). These two Seymours and their possible daughter Ann are the only Seymour’s in the Olney parish register of 1665-1812. Since a marriage typically took place in the parish of the bride, the scenario of the young Ann living with her parents in Olney and then marrying there is plausible. Note that Jeremiah Seymour died a few weeks after the birth of the first child of his daughter Ann and Richard York, who named the child Jeremiah. Jeremiah York, if the Olney connection is valid, in turn named his firstborn Semore/Seymour after his mother’s family name (Jeremiah York’s wife Sarah(?)’s maiden name has been postulated as Seymour, but I believe that unlikely, as discussed later).
Jeremiah’s paternal grandmother was possibly Jane York (widow, burial 23 AUG 1688). There was only one other family of York’s in Olney at this time, a John and Ann York with 6 children. If Jane were also the mother of this John, she died 5 days before the death of one of his young sons (it was not unusual for an illness to become fatal to both young and elderly family members about the same time).
The rationale for the Jeremiah Yorke of Olney being the Jeremiah York of Randolph County is several fold:
· First, there is reason to believe that Jeremiah of Randolph County was an emigrant from England and that Jeremiah of Olney was also an emigrant.
- Based on family lore, Jeremiah of Randolph County, rather than a forefather of his, is assumed to be the emigrant to America. For example, the autobiography of a great-grandson suggest that he is the emigrant. Also, Jeremiah’s settling in William Penn’s Nottingham Township in Pennsylvania as an emigrant rather than being from a family long established in coastal America is consistent with recruiting pattern of Penn. Further, there is no known evidence of his birth in America, while documentation does exist for births of other children, including unrelated York’s, born in America about the same time.
- For Jeremiah of Olney, there is no record of his marriage or burial in the Olney parish records (the law required registration of christenings and marriages in the parish, even for non-conformists) or the county database of the Buckingham Family History Society, and there is no record of his marriage elsewhere in England in the IGI extractions (which do not include burials), which suggests that he emigrated.
· Second, the Jeremiah York of Olney is one of the few in English parish records extracted by the IGI that is a possible match in age. I estimate that the IGI covers very roughly ½ of the christenings of this era, generally almost completely for a parish or not at all. Between the surname York, which is not common, and the first name Jeremiah, which is unusual, just finding a match suggests a possible link.
- In America, Jeremiah’s age is constrained by the tax records in West Nottingham (he would have been at least 21 in 1718 to own land) and the sale of the Terrapin Neck land in what is now West Virginia in 1753 and subsequent move to Randolph County (i.e., he was still alive then). His son Semore bequeaths “land on which my father lived” in his will written in Randolph County in 1782, presumably indicating that his father is dead. I am not aware of any other later record of Jeremiah in either old Frederick County in the Virginia area (his son Jeremiah is likely the Jeremiah who occasionally appears in records there soon after 1760) or Randolph County (his grandson Jeremiah is probably the Jeremiah who occasionally appears in records there soon after 1770). Presumably he sold the Terrapin Neck land, where he had spent some 20 years and his longest known time anywhere in America, after carving a farm out of the frontier and then followed some of his sons to Randolph County (Semore had initiated a land grant there in 1750) to live out his last years. These constraints suggest that he was born between 1680 and 1697, which is consistent with the 1683 birth in Olney, and died sometime after the mid-1750’s.
- Based on the estimated birth dates of his children (the first, Semore, about 1727, and the youngest possibly in the 1740’s), his wife Sarah(?) was born about 1700-1710. They are presumed to have married about 1725, when Jeremiah was 42. Although somewhat old to be starting a family and probably about 20 years older than his wife, this age difference is not unusual.
· Third, Jeremiah of Olney and Jeremiah of Randolph County were likely both Protestants. The given (first) name Jeremiah was first used in England in the 1600’s by non-conforming Protestants. Such non-conformists were recruited by Penn for his settlements by enticing them with religious freedom and opportunities for success through hard work without the burden of class distinctions that existed in England. Jeremiah Seymour was a glovemaker by craft, and several of the other York’s of this era in Olney were listed in the burials as simply laborers. These common class families would have fallen under the criteria used by Penn’s agents for likely recruits.
· Fourth and perhaps most convincing, the Olney connection provides a documented family maiden surname as a rationale for Jeremiah to give his firstborn the unusual name Seymour/Semore. It was common for the first son to get name from the maternal side. It would be rare coincidence if two separate Jeremiah York’s had a wife or mother with the maiden name Seymour.
In sum, although there is not direct evidence linking Jeremiah of Olney to Jeremiah of Randolph County, the circumstantial evidence is fairly convincing.
Information from Olney Parish Registers
Source: Parish registers, Church of England, Parish Church of Olney (Buckinghamshire) Baptisms 1665-1881, Marriages 1668-1785, 1789-1812, Burials 1667-1812, Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Film 919243. This source was supplemented by the Bishop’s transcripts for Olney, also available on microfilm. No additional York’s were found in the Bishop’s transcripts before the 1st York entry (1670) in the parish registers.
The dated events are as described in the parish registers. The only changes made are for dates from 1 Jan to 24 Mar for years before 1752, where the form 1683/84 is used instead of 1683, because the year began on 25 Mar until 1752.
All York’s in the registers are included. The family groupings shown are deduced and considered reasonable but not unique. Other presumptions and possibilities are described in italics.
Jane York, widow, burial 23 AUG 1688 Possibly the mother of one or both of the below household heads Richard and John York. Note that she died 5 days before her possible grandson John (it was not unusual for an illness to strike both young and elderly family members about the same time).
Jeremiah Seymour, burial 21 Sep 1683 “Glover” added after name in Bishop’s transcripts, indicating his occupation as a maker of gloves; this occupational title is common in that era. Ann Seamore, widow, buried 8 Oct 1694 [name spelled Seamour in Bishop’s transcripts] Jeremiah Seymour and Ann Seamour were possibly married and the parents of Ann Seymour (see below), the mother of Jeremiah York. These three are the only Seymour’s in the parish registers of 1665-1812. Note that Jeremiah Seymour died a few weeks after the birth of the first child of this daughter Ann and Richard York, who named the child Jeremiah.
Richard York, presumed family head Richard Yorke m. Ann Seymour, 14 NOV 1682 Richard York, burial 6 Mar 1695/6 Children Jeremiah Yorke, son of Richard, ch. 09 SEP 1683 Mary York, daughter of Richard, ch. 01 SEP 1684 Mary Yorke, burial 29 Mar 1700 Richard Yorke, son of Richard, ch. 02 MAY 1686 Ann York, daughter of Richard, ch. 13 JAN 1688/9 Elizabeth York, ch. 30 APR 1693, dau of Richard York John Glover m. Elizabeth York, 29 SEP 1716 Child Anne Glover, daughter of John, ch. 20 JAN 1721 and died 24 JAN 1721
John York, presumed family head, possibly brother or cousin of Richard John York, burial 16 Apr 1721 Anne, presumed wife Anne York, wife of John, burial 3 Jun 1712 Children Suz Yorke, daughter of John, ch. 17 Dec 1670 George Yorke, son of John, ch. 2 Feb 1672/3 Mary, presumed wife Mary York, wife of George, burial 26 JAN 1728/9 George York, labourer, burial 17 JAN 1729/30 Children George York, son of George, ch. 18 JAN 1703/4 George Yorke, son of George, burial 2 Jul 1705 Mary Yorke, daughter of George, ch. 08 NOV 1707 Ann Yorke, daughter of John, aged 2 ½ years, ch. 25 Mar 1681 Hugh Smith m. Anne York, 19 Jul 1696 [no christenings found with father Hugh Smith in Olney] John Yorke, son of John, ch. 25 Mar 1681 John York, son of John, burial 28 Aug 1688 Elizabeth York, daughter of John, ch. 9 Nov 1684 Elizabeth York, daughter of John, burial 23 Feb 1687/8 Thomas Yorke, son of John, ch. 24 Aug 1686 Presumed m1. unknown about 1710; she died before 1718; then Thomas York m. Anne Chater, 3 JUN 1718 Thomas York, labourer, burial, 2 JAN 1739/40 Anne York, widow, burial 2 FEB 1743/4 Children John York, son of Thomas, aged 8 years, ch. 24 FEB 1719/20 Jn York, son of Thomas, burial 21 NOV 1723 Thomas York, son of Thomas, ch. 20 FEB 1720/21 Thomas York, son of Thomas, burial 27 FEB 1721/2 Child of Thomas York, burial 16 JAN 1727/8
John York m. Anne Durant 05 APR 1702 Uncertain how this John relates to other York’s in Olney. Possibly Olney was the bride’s parish, and the couple then lived in another parish where John was from.
William York, son of James, burial 9 FEB 1732/3 Uncertain how this family relates to other York’s in Olney. Neither this William nor James has other entries.
Susanna York, burial, 19 JAN 1785 Uncertain how she relates to other York’s in Olney.
Robert York, presumed family head. Uncertain how he relates to earlier generations of York’s in Olney. Robert York m. Mary Rush, 6 OCT 1770 [by license] Robert York is the churchwarden in 1794, 1798, and 1804, and William York, in 1822. A mortuary, which is paid to the vicar on death, is paid for Robert York in 1815 and for Mary York in 1822. Children John York, son of Robert, aged 1 ½ years, ch. 9 Oct 1772 John York m. Ruth Brice, 25 DEC 1796 [by license] Lucy, daughter of Robert, ch. 9 OCT 1772 Samuel Gray m. Lucy York, 2 SEP 1798 [by banns] William, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 2 MAR 1774] Robert, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 12 MAR 1779] Robert York m. Sarah James, 14 NOV 1804 [by banns] Thomas, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 28 APR 1781] Mary, daughter of Robert, ch. [born 1 APR 1783] Mary, daughter of Robert, burial 5 SEP 1793 Christiana daughter of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 25 DEC 1785] Francis, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 6 SEP 1788] Francis, son of Robert, burial 21 JUL 1791
Possible Forefathers of Jeremiah York
Beyond his father Richard, no unambiguous links to earlier generations have been found, despite considerable effort. The existence of pre-1665 York’s in Olney is possible but uncertain. Records back to 1600 for Olney exist but are incomplete, and no York’s are recorded. My current efforts are focused in the neighboring county of Northamptonshire.
In the 1670-1695 timeframe, besides the 2 York heads of household in Olney, in adjacent parishes there were 2 in Lavendon and 1 in Turvey (Bedfordshire), plus 2 other marriages (without following christenings) in Clifton Reynes and 1 in Hanslope. All of these parishes are close enough to be visible from a single vantage point. While the 2 in Lavendon are brothers, the other relationships are unknown. There is solid evidence from parish records that York’s moved among those parishes. Although earlier records exist for those parishes than for Olney, there is still no record of earlier York’s there.
Olney sits in northern Buckinghamshire on the boundary with two other counties, Northamptonshire and Bedfordshire. Several Northamptonshire parishes (Long Buckby, Moulton, and Naseby) have records of York’s as far back as the mid-1500’s, the start of parish records in England. All of these parishes are within a day’s walk (10 to 20 miles) of each other. People of the Yorks’ class (small farmers, tradesmen, craftsmen, and laborers) could certainly have moved these types of distances. Olney was on the route to London and may have been appealing to those from smaller, poorer parishes for economic, farming land availability, or religious reasons. One of the Lavendon York’s (Moses York) can be traced from a christening in Naseby to a marriage in Bedford and then to raising a family and dying in Lavendon. Jeremiah’s father may also have migrated to Olney from Northamptonshire.
A Northamptonshire origin is also reasonable because this county had the most York’s in the 1881 census, far more than even London. The larger cities, with more job opportunities and much larger populations, have drawn people from counties such as Northamptonshire. This migration has been documented by the censuses. The fact that Northamptonshire still had the most York’s in 1881 suggests that it was the major center for York’s (this concentration is not shown in the pre-1700 IGI extractions, but they are also a reflection of parish record preservation). Also, Northamptonshire has far more York genealogists participating in English genealogy projects than other counties (20 vs. typically 0 to 3).
Other less likely options for migration to Olney can be proposed: (1) The York’s may be fleeing to the country to escape the London plague of 1665. However, most people fleeing were well off and later returned. (2) The best fit found in time and name correlation in the IGI extractions for Richard, Jeremiah’s father, is a 1651 christening in East Hendred, Berkshire, with parents Humphrey and Jane. While Jane appears as a widow in Olney, Humphrey is not a continued family name there, and there is no clear reason for a move from East Hendred (somewhat near London) to the rural Olney area.
Although somewhat disappointing not to be able to put unambiguous names and places earlier on the family tree, it is probable that they lived not far from Olney and had much the same occupations. Since parish records go back only to the mid-1500’s, only about 3 to 4 more generations might be found. If found, that would still leave about 200 years since surnames were adopted (14th century) for which no relevant records exist.
Previous Research on Jeremiah York and Ancestors in England
The origin of the previous work is uncertain, although much of it appears to be based on IGI extractions of parish records and other information on landed gentry and aristocracy of England. I do not know who did the earlier research and hesitate to criticize it without consulting the authors but find it necessary to address those results to put my own research in context. The previous researchers may have given the appropriate caveats that some of links were merely possibilities without any basis other than matches of surname and date range. However, based on current web postings, some of the facts of these IGI extractions have been modified, making them appear to be better links than they actually are. My analysis of this previous research covers both Jeremiah’s spouse(s) and ancestors.
Jeremiah first married Ann Willis - Some web postings have Jeremiah first marrying an Ann Willis or Ann unknown prior to marrying Sarah Seymour. An actual IGI extracted parish record shows a Jeremiah Yorke m. Ann Willis, 04 Nov 1735, Ryton By Shifnal, Shropshire, England. Since the Jeremiah in America was then living on Terrapin Neck, already married to Sarah(?), and in the middle of the births of their children, this Ann Willis marriage was not connected to Jeremiah, the patriarch of the Randolph County York’s. Judging from Jeremiah’s birth date in Olney of 1683, he could have been married prior to the Sarah(?) marriage, but there is no known record of the marriage, any children, or the death of the first wife, making this assumption speculative.
Jeremiah second married Sarah Seymour - The only apparent basis for her first name (a popular name of that era) is that several of her granddaughters (and perhaps a daughter), including her eldest son Semore’s eldest daughter, have that name, and it is postulated that they were named after Jeremiah’s wife. The only apparent basis for her surname is an attempt to explain her son’s unusual first name Semore/Seymour. However, now that Jeremiah’s mother is known to have that surname, there is no need to hypothesize that it came from Jeremiah’s wife. It would be uncommon for both Jeremiah and his father to have married Seymour’s, so it is more likely that Sarah(?)’s maiden name is a different and unknown surname. The presumption that she is an emigrant is reasonable, based on association with the West Nottingham settlers and the note in Brantley York’s autobiography. Interestingly, in the West Nottingham tax lists for 1727 only, there is a York entry for what appears to be Sarain as well as for Jeremiah (spelling was not consistent in that era; Jeremiah and York both have various spellings in these tax lists). If this is his wife, it is unclear why she would have a separate entry, since the husband typically owned most property and paid the taxes.
Parents of Sarah Seymour - Sarah Seymour’s parents are typically posted as Col. John Seymour and Johanna, both born about 1735. The basis for Sarah’s connection to them is unknown but suspect (plus I now consider it unlikely that her maiden name was Seymour). With Sarah’s estimated birth date of about 1705, her parents would have been about 70 at Sarah’s birth. His death date of 30 July 1709 is likely confused with the well-established same death date of a Col. John Seymour who was Governor of Maryland, b. 18 Sept 1659 in Gloucestershire, married twice (neither named Johanna or Joan), and had 4 children (none named Sarah). The 1735 birth dates may have come from another Col. John Seymour, who was of Berry Pomeroy in Devon and could have been born circa 1635 (his next older sibling was b. 1633) and who married _ Kennedy (birth date unknown), daughter of a Sir Richard Kennedy, but with children not listed in the landed gentry catalogs. There are numerous other Seymour’s who could hypothetically link to Sarah without invoking aristocratic links. If the York’s and Seymour’s of Olney are an indication, my family origins are more humble.
Jeremiah York born ABT 1657 in Olney and died 5 MAR 1694/95 in Olney - The typical web posting has this Jeremiah as the father of the Randolph County Jeremiah, who is shown as born in Olney about 1694. My examination of the actual Olney parish records disproves this hypothesis. A potential variation is to have the second Jeremiah born in America about 1705. This would make the second Jeremiah about the same age as Sarah Seymour, so that their marriage is more typical. However, there is no evidence of the marriage or death of the first Jeremiah or birth of the second Jeremiah, making this variation pure speculation. Also, Jeremiah is listed as “Sr” when selling the Terrapin Neck land, which would distinguish him from his son of the same name but not from a father of the same name.
Richard York married Rebecca Mumford ABT 1657 in Bucks - The next earlier York generation linked to Jeremiah in Olney typically posted on the web is the marriage of Richard York and Rebecca Mumford [about 1657 in Buckinghamshire]. This link appears to be a confusion with the records of another parish: Richd. York m. Rebecca Murford (spelled Mumford in her christening), 4 May 1658, Allhallows London Wall, London, England. There is no established connection of this marriage to the York's in Olney. Any other York marriage in England about this time would "fit" just as well.
Richard York married Susan Starling 1 OCT 1639 in Buckingham County - A still earlier York generation linked to Jeremiah in Olney typically posted on the web is the marriage of Richard York and Susan Starling [1 Oct 1639 in Bucks]. This link also appears to be a confusion with the records of another parish: Richard Yorke m. Susan Starling, 1 Oct 1639, Melton, Suffolk, England. There is no established connection of this marriage to the York's in Olney (or to Richard York who m. Rebecca Mumford). Any other York marriage in England about this time would "fit" just as well. Also, her alleged birth of 10 Oct 1619 in Woughton-in-Green, Buckingham County, England is questionable, since that parish records index, which covers 1558-1875, has no entry for her.
John York, born between 1590-1598 - The earliest generation typically posted that links to Jeremiah is a John York born in Yorkshire between 1590 and 1598. Although there are several fathers named John of sons named Richard in the IGI extractions, there is no apparent reason to select one, plus the intervening links to Jeremiah have already been discredited.
Jim York -- fireball@comcast.net -- York’s of Olney and Surrounding Parishes, Buckinghamshire, England, 1665-1812
Jeremiah York in Olney, England and Randolph County, North Carolina
The parish records of Olney show a Jeremiah Yorke christened on 09 SEP 1683. As argued below, he may be the Jeremiah York who is progenitor of the York’s of Randolph County. His parents were Richard Yorke and Ann Seymour, who were married on 14 NOV 1682. His siblings were Mary, ch. 01 SEP 1684 and buried 29 Mar 1700, Richard, ch. 02 MAY 1686, Ann, ch. 13 JAN 1688/9, and Elizabeth, ch. 30 APR 1693.
Jeremiah York’s father Richard was buried 6 MAR 1695/6, when Jeremiah, the oldest child, was 12 and the youngest child was 2. Although Jeremiah would have emigrated before 1718 (age 34, when he was in West Nottingham, PA), at least his sister Elizabeth remained, married, and had a child in 1721 in Olney. His mother possibly reached out to extended family of the Seymour’s and York’s elsewhere in the region to help raise her young family, perhaps providing fatherless Jeremiah with a strong link to the Seymour family. Since there is no record of his brother Richard associated with Jeremiah in America, he may have stayed in England (there is no more record of him in Olney, but there are several marriages of Richard York’s elsewhere in England that could fit).
Jeremiah’s maternal grandparents were possibly Jeremiah Seymour (a glovemaker, burial 21 Sep 1683) and Ann Seymour (widow, buried 8 Oct 1694). These two Seymours and their possible daughter Ann are the only Seymour’s in the Olney parish register of 1665-1812. Since a marriage typically took place in the parish of the bride, the scenario of the young Ann living with her parents in Olney and then marrying there is plausible. Note that Jeremiah Seymour died a few weeks after the birth of the first child of his daughter Ann and Richard York, who named the child Jeremiah. Jeremiah York, if the Olney connection is valid, in turn named his firstborn Semore/Seymour after his mother’s family name (Jeremiah York’s wife Sarah(?)’s maiden name has been postulated as Seymour, but I believe that unlikely, as discussed later).
Jeremiah’s paternal grandmother was possibly Jane York (widow, burial 23 AUG 1688). There was only one other family of York’s in Olney at this time, a John and Ann York with 6 children. If Jane were also the mother of this John, she died 5 days before the death of one of his young sons (it was not unusual for an illness to become fatal to both young and elderly family members about the same time).
The rationale for the Jeremiah Yorke of Olney being the Jeremiah York of Randolph County is several fold:
· First, there is reason to believe that Jeremiah of Randolph County was an emigrant from England and that Jeremiah of Olney was also an emigrant.
- Based on family lore, Jeremiah of Randolph County, rather than a forefather of his, is assumed to be the emigrant to America. For example, the autobiography of a great-grandson suggest that he is the emigrant. Also, Jeremiah’s settling in William Penn’s Nottingham Township in Pennsylvania as an emigrant rather than being from a family long established in coastal America is consistent with recruiting pattern of Penn. Further, there is no known evidence of his birth in America, while documentation does exist for births of other children, including unrelated York’s, born in America about the same time.
- For Jeremiah of Olney, there is no record of his marriage or burial in the Olney parish records (the law required registration of christenings and marriages in the parish, even for non-conformists) or the county database of the Buckingham Family History Society, and there is no record of his marriage elsewhere in England in the IGI extractions (which do not include burials), which suggests that he emigrated.
· Second, the Jeremiah York of Olney is one of the few in English parish records extracted by the IGI that is a possible match in age. I estimate that the IGI covers very roughly ½ of the christenings of this era, generally almost completely for a parish or not at all. Between the surname York, which is not common, and the first name Jeremiah, which is unusual, just finding a match suggests a possible link.
- In America, Jeremiah’s age is constrained by the tax records in West Nottingham (he would have been at least 21 in 1718 to own land) and the sale of the Terrapin Neck land in what is now West Virginia in 1753 and subsequent move to Randolph County (i.e., he was still alive then). His son Semore bequeaths “land on which my father lived” in his will written in Randolph County in 1782, presumably indicating that his father is dead. I am not aware of any other later record of Jeremiah in either old Frederick County in the Virginia area (his son Jeremiah is likely the Jeremiah who occasionally appears in records there soon after 1760) or Randolph County (his grandson Jeremiah is probably the Jeremiah who occasionally appears in records there soon after 1770). Presumably he sold the Terrapin Neck land, where he had spent some 20 years and his longest known time anywhere in America, after carving a farm out of the frontier and then followed some of his sons to Randolph County (Semore had initiated a land grant there in 1750) to live out his last years. These constraints suggest that he was born between 1680 and 1697, which is consistent with the 1683 birth in Olney, and died sometime after the mid-1750’s.
- Based on the estimated birth dates of his children (the first, Semore, about 1727, and the youngest possibly in the 1740’s), his wife Sarah(?) was born about 1700-1710. They are presumed to have married about 1725, when Jeremiah was 42. Although somewhat old to be starting a family and probably about 20 years older than his wife, this age difference is not unusual.
· Third, Jeremiah of Olney and Jeremiah of Randolph County were likely both Protestants. The given (first) name Jeremiah was first used in England in the 1600’s by non-conforming Protestants. Such non-conformists were recruited by Penn for his settlements by enticing them with religious freedom and opportunities for success through hard work without the burden of class distinctions that existed in England. Jeremiah Seymour was a glovemaker by craft, and several of the other York’s of this era in Olney were listed in the burials as simply laborers. These common class families would have fallen under the criteria used by Penn’s agents for likely recruits.
· Fourth and perhaps most convincing, the Olney connection provides a documented family maiden surname as a rationale for Jeremiah to give his firstborn the unusual name Seymour/Semore. It was common for the first son to get name from the maternal side. It would be rare coincidence if two separate Jeremiah York’s had a wife or mother with the maiden name Seymour.
In sum, although there is not direct evidence linking Jeremiah of Olney to Jeremiah of Randolph County, the circumstantial evidence is fairly convincing.
Information from Olney Parish Registers
Source: Parish registers, Church of England, Parish Church of Olney (Buckinghamshire) Baptisms 1665-1881, Marriages 1668-1785, 1789-1812, Burials 1667-1812, Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Film 919243. This source was supplemented by the Bishop’s transcripts for Olney, also available on microfilm. No additional York’s were found in the Bishop’s transcripts before the 1st York entry (1670) in the parish registers.
The dated events are as described in the parish registers. The only changes made are for dates from 1 Jan to 24 Mar for years before 1752, where the form 1683/84 is used instead of 1683, because the year began on 25 Mar until 1752.
All York’s in the registers are included. The family groupings shown are deduced and considered reasonable but not unique. Other presumptions and possibilities are described in italics.
Jane York, widow, burial 23 AUG 1688 Possibly the mother of one or both of the below household heads Richard and John York. Note that she died 5 days before her possible grandson John (it was not unusual for an illness to strike both young and elderly family members about the same time).
Jeremiah Seymour, burial 21 Sep 1683 “Glover” added after name in Bishop’s transcripts, indicating his occupation as a maker of gloves; this occupational title is common in that era. Ann Seamore, widow, buried 8 Oct 1694 [name spelled Seamour in Bishop’s transcripts] Jeremiah Seymour and Ann Seamour were possibly married and the parents of Ann Seymour (see below), the mother of Jeremiah York. These three are the only Seymour’s in the parish registers of 1665-1812. Note that Jeremiah Seymour died a few weeks after the birth of the first child of this daughter Ann and Richard York, who named the child Jeremiah.
Richard York, presumed family head Richard Yorke m. Ann Seymour, 14 NOV 1682 Richard York, burial 6 Mar 1695/6 Children Jeremiah Yorke, son of Richard, ch. 09 SEP 1683 Mary York, daughter of Richard, ch. 01 SEP 1684 Mary Yorke, burial 29 Mar 1700 Richard Yorke, son of Richard, ch. 02 MAY 1686 Ann York, daughter of Richard, ch. 13 JAN 1688/9 Elizabeth York, ch. 30 APR 1693, dau of Richard York John Glover m. Elizabeth York, 29 SEP 1716 Child Anne Glover, daughter of John, ch. 20 JAN 1721 and died 24 JAN 1721
John York, presumed family head, possibly brother or cousin of Richard John York, burial 16 Apr 1721 Anne, presumed wife Anne York, wife of John, burial 3 Jun 1712 Children Suz Yorke, daughter of John, ch. 17 Dec 1670 George Yorke, son of John, ch. 2 Feb 1672/3 Mary, presumed wife Mary York, wife of George, burial 26 JAN 1728/9 George York, labourer, burial 17 JAN 1729/30 Children George York, son of George, ch. 18 JAN 1703/4 George Yorke, son of George, burial 2 Jul 1705 Mary Yorke, daughter of George, ch. 08 NOV 1707 Ann Yorke, daughter of John, aged 2 ½ years, ch. 25 Mar 1681 Hugh Smith m. Anne York, 19 Jul 1696 [no christenings found with father Hugh Smith in Olney] John Yorke, son of John, ch. 25 Mar 1681 John York, son of John, burial 28 Aug 1688 Elizabeth York, daughter of John, ch. 9 Nov 1684 Elizabeth York, daughter of John, burial 23 Feb 1687/8 Thomas Yorke, son of John, ch. 24 Aug 1686 Presumed m1. unknown about 1710; she died before 1718; then Thomas York m. Anne Chater, 3 JUN 1718 Thomas York, labourer, burial, 2 JAN 1739/40 Anne York, widow, burial 2 FEB 1743/4 Children John York, son of Thomas, aged 8 years, ch. 24 FEB 1719/20 Jn York, son of Thomas, burial 21 NOV 1723 Thomas York, son of Thomas, ch. 20 FEB 1720/21 Thomas York, son of Thomas, burial 27 FEB 1721/2 Child of Thomas York, burial 16 JAN 1727/8
John York m. Anne Durant 05 APR 1702 Uncertain how this John relates to other York’s in Olney. Possibly Olney was the bride’s parish, and the couple then lived in another parish where John was from.
William York, son of James, burial 9 FEB 1732/3 Uncertain how this family relates to other York’s in Olney. Neither this William nor James has other entries.
Susanna York, burial, 19 JAN 1785 Uncertain how she relates to other York’s in Olney.
Robert York, presumed family head. Uncertain how he relates to earlier generations of York’s in Olney. Robert York m. Mary Rush, 6 OCT 1770 [by license] Robert York is the churchwarden in 1794, 1798, and 1804, and William York, in 1822. A mortuary, which is paid to the vicar on death, is paid for Robert York in 1815 and for Mary York in 1822. Children John York, son of Robert, aged 1 ½ years, ch. 9 Oct 1772 John York m. Ruth Brice, 25 DEC 1796 [by license] Lucy, daughter of Robert, ch. 9 OCT 1772 Samuel Gray m. Lucy York, 2 SEP 1798 [by banns] William, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 2 MAR 1774] Robert, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 12 MAR 1779] Robert York m. Sarah James, 14 NOV 1804 [by banns] Thomas, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 28 APR 1781] Mary, daughter of Robert, ch. [born 1 APR 1783] Mary, daughter of Robert, burial 5 SEP 1793 Christiana daughter of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 25 DEC 1785] Francis, son of Robert, ch. 18 July 1791 [born 6 SEP 1788] Francis, son of Robert, burial 21 JUL 1791
Possible Forefathers of Jeremiah York
Beyond his father Richard, no unambiguous links to earlier generations have been found, despite considerable effort. The existence of pre-1665 York’s in Olney is possible but uncertain. Records back to 1600 for Olney exist but are incomplete, and no York’s are recorded. My current efforts are focused in the neighboring county of Northamptonshire.
In the 1670-1695 timeframe, besides the 2 York heads of household in Olney, in adjacent parishes there were 2 in Lavendon and 1 in Turvey (Bedfordshire), plus 2 other marriages (without following christenings) in Clifton Reynes and 1 in Hanslope. All of these parishes are close enough to be visible from a single vantage point. While the 2 in Lavendon are brothers, the other relationships are unknown. There is solid evidence from parish records that York’s moved among those parishes. Although earlier records exist for those parishes than for Olney, there is still no record of earlier York’s there.
Olney sits in northern Buckinghamshire on the boundary with two other counties, Northamptonshire and Bedfordshire. Several Northamptonshire parishes (Long Buckby, Moulton, and Naseby) have records of York’s as far back as the mid-1500’s, the start of parish records in England. All of these parishes are within a day’s walk (10 to 20 miles) of each other. People of the Yorks’ class (small farmers, tradesmen, craftsmen, and laborers) could certainly have moved these types of distances. Olney was on the route to London and may have been appealing to those from smaller, poorer parishes for economic, farming land availability, or religious reasons. One of the Lavendon York’s (Moses York) can be traced from a christening in Naseby to a marriage in Bedford and then to raising a family and dying in Lavendon. Jeremiah’s father may also have migrated to Olney from Northamptonshire.
A Northamptonshire origin is also reasonable because this county had the most York’s in the 1881 census, far more than even London. The larger cities, with more job opportunities and much larger populations, have drawn people from counties such as Northamptonshire. This migration has been documented by the censuses. The fact that Northamptonshire still had the most York’s in 1881 suggests that it was the major center for York’s (this concentration is not shown in the pre-1700 IGI extractions, but they are also a reflection of parish record preservation). Also, Northamptonshire has far more York genealogists participating in English genealogy projects than other counties (20 vs. typically 0 to 3).
Other less likely options for migration to Olney can be proposed: (1) The York’s may be fleeing to the country to escape the London plague of 1665. However, most people fleeing were well off and later returned. (2) The best fit found in time and name correlation in the IGI extractions for Richard, Jeremiah’s father, is a 1651 christening in East Hendred, Berkshire, with parents Humphrey and Jane. While Jane appears as a widow in Olney, Humphrey is not a continued family name there, and there is no clear reason for a move from East Hendred (somewhat near London) to the rural Olney area.
Although somewhat disappointing not to be able to put unambiguous names and places earlier on the family tree, it is probable that they lived not far from Olney and had much the same occupations. Since parish records go back only to the mid-1500’s, only about 3 to 4 more generations might be found. If found, that would still leave about 200 years since surnames were adopted (14th century) for which no relevant records exist.
Previous Research on Jeremiah York and Ancestors in England
The origin of the previous work is uncertain, although much of it appears to be based on IGI extractions of parish records and other information on landed gentry and aristocracy of England. I do not know who did the earlier research and hesitate to criticize it without consulting the authors but find it necessary to address those results to put my own research in context. The previous researchers may have given the appropriate caveats that some of links were merely possibilities without any basis other than matches of surname and date range. However, based on current web postings, some of the facts of these IGI extractions have been modified, making them appear to be better links than they actually are. My analysis of this previous research covers both Jeremiah’s spouse(s) and ancestors.
Jeremiah first married Ann Willis - Some web postings have Jeremiah first marrying an Ann Willis or Ann unknown prior to marrying Sarah Seymour. An actual IGI extracted parish record shows a Jeremiah Yorke m. Ann Willis, 04 Nov 1735, Ryton By Shifnal, Shropshire, England. Since the Jeremiah in America was then living on Terrapin Neck, already married to Sarah(?), and in the middle of the births of their children, this Ann Willis marriage was not connected to Jeremiah, the patriarch of the Randolph County York’s. Judging from Jeremiah’s birth date in Olney of 1683, he could have been married prior to the Sarah(?) marriage, but there is no known record of the marriage, any children, or the death of the first wife, making this assumption speculative.
Jeremiah second married Sarah Seymour - The only apparent basis for her first name (a popular name of that era) is that several of her granddaughters (and perhaps a daughter), including her eldest son Semore’s eldest daughter, have that name, and it is postulated that they were named after Jeremiah’s wife. The only apparent basis for her surname is an attempt to explain her son’s unusual first name Semore/Seymour. However, now that Jeremiah’s mother is known to have that surname, there is no need to hypothesize that it came from Jeremiah’s wife. It would be uncommon for both Jeremiah and his father to have married Seymour’s, so it is more likely that Sarah(?)’s maiden name is a different and unknown surname. The presumption that she is an emigrant is reasonable, based on association with the West Nottingham settlers and the note in Brantley York’s autobiography. Interestingly, in the West Nottingham tax lists for 1727 only, there is a York entry for what appears to be Sarain as well as for Jeremiah (spelling was not consistent in that era; Jeremiah and York both have various spellings in these tax lists). If this is his wife, it is unclear why she would have a separate entry, since the husband typically owned most property and paid the taxes.
Parents of Sarah Seymour - Sarah Seymour’s parents are typically posted as Col. John Seymour and Johanna, both born about 1735. The basis for Sarah’s connection to them is unknown but suspect (plus I now consider it unlikely that her maiden name was Seymour). With Sarah’s estimated birth date of about 1705, her parents would have been about 70 at Sarah’s birth. His death date of 30 July 1709 is likely confused with the well-established same death date of a Col. John Seymour who was Governor of Maryland, b. 18 Sept 1659 in Gloucestershire, married twice (neither named Johanna or Joan), and had 4 children (none named Sarah). The 1735 birth dates may have come from another Col. John Seymour, who was of Berry Pomeroy in Devon and could have been born circa 1635 (his next older sibling was b. 1633) and who married _ Kennedy (birth date unknown), daughter of a Sir Richard Kennedy, but with children not listed in the landed gentry catalogs. There are numerous other Seymour’s who could hypothetically link to Sarah without invoking aristocratic links. If the York’s and Seymour’s of Olney are an indication, my family origins are more humble.
Jeremiah York born ABT 1657 in Olney and died 5 MAR 1694/95 in Olney - The typical web posting has this Jeremiah as the father of the Randolph County Jeremiah, who is shown as born in Olney about 1694. My examination of the actual Olney parish records disproves this hypothesis. A potential variation is to have the second Jeremiah born in America about 1705. This would make the second Jeremiah about the same age as Sarah Seymour, so that their marriage is more typical. However, there is no evidence of the marriage or death of the first Jeremiah or birth of the second Jeremiah, making this variation pure speculation. Also, Jeremiah is listed as “Sr” when selling the Terrapin Neck land, which would distinguish him from his son of the same name but not from a father of the same name.
Richard York married Rebecca Mumford ABT 1657 in Bucks - The next earlier York generation linked to Jeremiah in Olney typically posted on the web is the marriage of Richard York and Rebecca Mumford [about 1657 in Buckinghamshire]. This link appears to be a confusion with the records of another parish: Richd. York m. Rebecca Murford (spelled Mumford in her christening), 4 May 1658, Allhallows London Wall, London, England. There is no established connection of this marriage to the York's in Olney. Any other York marriage in England about this time would "fit" just as well.
Richard York married Susan Starling 1 OCT 1639 in Buckingham County - A still earlier York generation linked to Jeremiah in Olney typically posted on the web is the marriage of Richard York and Susan Starling [1 Oct 1639 in Bucks]. This link also appears to be a confusion with the records of another parish: Richard Yorke m. Susan Starling, 1 Oct 1639, Melton, Suffolk, England. There is no established connection of this marriage to the York's in Olney (or to Richard York who m. Rebecca Mumford). Any other York marriage in England about this time would "fit" just as well. Also, her alleged birth of 10 Oct 1619 in Woughton-in-Green, Buckingham County, England is questionable, since that parish records index, which covers 1558-1875, has no entry for her.
John York, born between 1590-1598 - The earliest generation typically posted that links to Jeremiah is a John York born in Yorkshire between 1590 and 1598. Although there are several fathers named John of sons named Richard in the IGI extractions, there is no apparent reason to select one, plus the intervening links to Jeremiah have already been discredited.
Mark Jackson: State of North Carolina, Ralph Gould Entry offer of claim for land in the County of Guilford. To the surveyor of the said County Greeting. You are hereby required as soon as may be _________ of survey for Jeremiah York. A tract or Parcel of land as having one hundred ____ ____ acres laying in the county afore said on South side Mount Pleasant Creek abounding land, Creek begining on the North side, said Creek Near a small branch thence West thence, South to John Writes line thence North said line to the corner thence South thence East to the begining. Observing the Direction of the City of _____________ in ______. Made and recorded for ___________ out ______. For just and fair _________ of such survey with a proper Certificate to Each you _____________ _______ remit with this warrant to the _____________ Office without Delay. Given under my hand at ________ held the first day of June and year 1779. Ralph Gould.
VIRGINIA NORTHERN NECK LAND GRANTS Volume II 1742-1775, compiled by Gertrude E. Gray page 50 -- G-541: Jeremiah York of Frederick Co. 323 A. in said Co. Surv. Mr. Guy Broadwater. On Potomack R. 7 June 1751 page 82 -- H-599: Vachael Medcalfe of Frederick Co. 300 A. in said Co. Surv. Mr. Thomas Rutherford Jr. On Potomack R., adj. Van Swaringon, Abraham James, Joremiah York. 7 Jan. 1755 page 116 -- K-100: Mr. Van Swarengen of Frederick Co. 200 A. on Potomack R. in said Co. Surv. Thomas Rutherford Jr. Adj. his own land, Vachell Medcalf, Jeremiah York. 9 Apr. 1760 page 154 -- M-215: Capt. Thomas Swearingen of Frederick Co. has 222 A. in said co. part of Grant to Richard Polson, Josiah Jones and Joseph Mounts for 834 A. 3 Oct. 1734. Said 222 A. was sold by Polson to Thomas Swearingen dec'd who devised by will to said Capt Thomas Swearingen his son, also 100 a. of said 834 A. was sold by Polson to Peter Liken who devised by will to his son Jacob Liken who sold to John Pearce and since purchased by said Thomas Swearingen the younger (Records of Frederick Co. Ct.) Resurv. of Mr. Thomas Rutherford shows 286 A. in said contiguous tracts & 38 A. adj. 324 A. to said Thomas Swearingen on Potomack R. near Jones's Mill Run, adj. Mr. Van Swearingen, Thomas Yorke. 6 Dec. 1763 page 155 -- M-226: Mr. Thomas Rutherford of Frederick Co. 220 A. on Jones's Mill Run of Potomack R. in said Co. Surv. Mr. Robert Rutherford. Adj. land formerly Joseph Mounts, Richard Poulson & Josiah Jones, Hon. Thomas Lord Fairfax, Col. John Carlyle, Thomas York, Capt. Thomas Swearingen. 17 Dec. 1763. page 222 -- P-218: Mr. Joseph Mitchell of Berkeley Co. 463 A. on Great Cacapehon in Hampshire Co. Surv. Richard Rigg. Adj. Henry Enoch, Jeremiah York, John Relfe. 13 July 1773.
Note:   Bruce York: I find it peculiar that the children identified as Jeremiah York, Junior's wer


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