Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Emma Elizabeth Fulham: Birth: 10 JUL 1851 in 8 Walberg St St George Middlesex UK. Death: 30 JUL 1929 in 69 Balmain Rd Leichhardt NSW Australia

  2. James Thomas Fulham: Birth: 14 MAR 1853 in 8 Walberg St St George Middlesex England (C). Death: 16 SEP 1904 in Sophia St Surry Hills Sydney NSW Australia (C)

  3. Person Not Viewable


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Henry Daniel Fulham: Birth: 9 JUN 1860 in Paddington England. Death: 30 APR 1942 in Paddington NSW Australia Age 82


Notes
a. Note:   NI0579
Note:   When James, beloved wife Emma passed away, leaving him with two small children to raise on his own, must have proved very difficult for him. However in 1856 James married a widow, Sarah Elizabeth Lovett born 1820 daughter of William Wallace of Yorkshire. Sarah had three surviving sons, William Wallace Lovett, age 12. John Lovett, age 10. & James Lovett, age 8. James & Sarah's marriage was blessed with a son, Henry Daniel Fulham. Published in a booklet by the Queensland Family History Society, letters from Emigrants to QLD 1863-1865. Queensland, Ipswich, August 14th 1865, Dear William, - We are all fine landed Ipswich in good health. We were 106 Days on the water; we had different sorts of birds follow us, & plenty of porpoises. We caught some very large birds with fish hooks. We had a great deal of amusement on board the ship, such as judge & jury, a Concert & a theatre. Your Mother used to take Dan to play on Sat evening, and it was very amusing. We did everything to make ourselves comfortable & happy. Of course it is rather akward landing in a strange country, nobody you know. You gape all around you, & stand with a frying pan with a handle 4 feet long, & about 10 pounds of steak frying in it in a field, or at the back of the house, & a kettle with your water in: a fire big enough to roast a bullock for cooking. You have to take a saw & chopper & cut down a tree where you like: just size of trees as there are in Kensington Park Gardens. This is a good palace for a man or woman; it will be the making of all of us. I am not earning much at present; it amounts to two pounds ten shillings per week; that is, I am getting one pound & everything found me. Your Mother & Dan, your brother, went up the country with a team of horses for a man in Ipswich. My James is with a plumber in Ipswich. They are both Living with their Masters. So, William, this is our first start in Queensland. If you were settled here I would buy some land directly as it is getting very dear near this town, about Sixty pounds per acre three & four miles from Brisbane or Ipswich; but two or three miles further you can buy it for four or five pounds per acre. I can compare the land to Kensington Park Gardens. only the bush is much thicker; you would lose yourself very soon if you ventured too far in the trees - that is what they call the bush. I can see every chance for a young man with his family to get on in the Colony; it wants a start certainly, but you can sooner get a start here than in England, for you save more money. It is not much for house smiths at present, but here soon will be; most of the blacksmiths are from Sydney. I could have gone to my trade up the country if I had chosen, but I could not see my road clear, it would be keeping two homes. A man pays One pound per week for his diet only, so I must be satisfied till I see a better chance. I hope that you are doing well in the shop. The style is this Colony is to wear a pair of white trousers, no waistcoat, a shire & thin boots. Every man that has been here a little while has a horse & saddle. There are plenty of wild ducks not more than a 100 yards from our house; I am making a machine to catch some of them. I can get 5s per pair for them in town. There are plenty of parrots about four miles from here/ The Kangaroo is good sport with a gun. We have just entered the Spring & everything looks pretty. Fruit trees are near out house. We have plenty of fresh beef & mutton, sweet potatoes & a sack of flour at a time. I can have plenty of eggs. Please to tell your Uncle Dan there is every prospect for shipwrights or carpenters. Your Uncle B___ would do well in the town; there is as much chance for one as there is for another. They send all people they can up the bush, and they do well there; you can buy a bullock for three pounds, a sheep for 10s. Butchering is a fine game here, they sell the prime & boil the rest down in large boilers, & send the fat in barrels to England. That game wants about One hundred pounds to start with, two men as partners, one to go up the bush & fetch or buy them, the other to stay at home & look after the business. The two men would earn Eight pounds each per week after all expenses were paid. You will hear from me every month. I will send every mail; so I wish you all good bye. Remember me to all your Uncles & Aunts & your son. From yours truly, James Fulham
After receiving this in depth letter from his step-father, William must have been influenced by the prospects of not only being able to find employment but being with his Mother & brothers as on the 28th Dec 1865, he & his family, embarked from the port of London on the Clipper ship the "Flying Cloud". Travelling with William were his wife Elizabeth Ann Aged 23, & their children Walter 5, & Ann who was an infant. Also they had travelling with them James' only daughter, Emma now 14. The family arrived in Moreton Bay, Brisbane, after a hazardous journey on 26 Apr 1866.


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.