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Family
Children:
  1. Johann Friedrich Dietz: Birth: ABT 1738 in Saar-Palatinate, Rhineland, Germany. Death: BET 1806 AND 1808 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Sources
1. Title:   'Dietz Cookbook & History'
Page:   A-1, A-6
Note:   Very good
Publication:   1990 The Print Shop, 110 Herron Street, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. 30742 (706) 861-5088
Author:   Sharon Pierce Schier & Maybelle McAbee Bates, compilers
Name:   Unknown
Givenname:   Unknown
RepositoryId:   R468
2. Title:   'Dietz Cookbook & History'
Page:   A-5
Note:   Very good
Publication:   1990 The Print Shop, 110 Herron Street, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. 30742 (706) 861-5088
Author:   Sharon Pierce Schier & Maybelle McAbee Bates, compilers
Name:   Unknown
Givenname:   Unknown
RepositoryId:   R468
3. Title:   'Dietz Cookbook & History'
Page:   A-6
Note:   Very good
Publication:   1990 The Print Shop, 110 Herron Street, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. 30742 (706) 861-5088
Author:   Sharon Pierce Schier & Maybelle McAbee Bates, compilers
Name:   Unknown
Givenname:   Unknown
RepositoryId:   R468

Notes
a. Note:   [2156644.FTW] From 'Dietz Cookbook and History 1990' compiled by Sharon Pierce Schierand Maybelle McAbee Bates: 'Our German Dietz Ancestors: Our original immigrant German ancestor was Johann Friedrich Dietz,who came to this country on the ship Edinburgh, docking at Philadelphia,Pennsylvania, on 15 September 1749. This shipload of immigrants came fromthe Palatinate, which was a centuries-old principality on thesouthwestern edge of the main body of Germany. The Rhenish Palatinate had for centuries been an area coveted bydukes, princes, and rulers. It was the scene of repeated wars andmilitary campaigns, suffering much devastation and destruction. In fact,the first wave of German overseas migration from the Palatinate wassparked by the systematic devastation of a retreating French army in 1689. Other waves of immigration to America followed in 1709-1710 and1717. So many people left southwest Germany that the Duke of Wurttemburgissued a strong warning against emigration. Obviously not deterred.thousands more left for Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and even Louisianain the following decades. Between 1727 and 1740, 80 ships carryingGermans arrived in Philadelphia, and another 159 ships arrived from 1740to 1755. In 1749 alone, 25 ships with 7,049 Germans onboard landed inPhiladelphia-- among them, our Johann Friedrich(1) Dietz. We know that our original immigrant was a tailor by profession and aLutheran by faith. While we cannot know his exact reason for leaving hishomeland to seek his fortunes in the New World, we may conclude that itwas probably a combination of political, economic, and religious reasons. Besides the destruction inherent in the repeated wars, anotheraspect of the political situation in the Palatinate was conscription ofmen into armies to fight for high-living princes and dukes. Mandatory warcontributions, plus heavier taxation, imposed economic hardship upon thePalatines. Also, after decades of Protestant rule, in 1685 the last elector ofthe Simmern line was succeeded by Philip William of the Roman Catholicline of Palatinate-Zweibrucken-Neuberg, and Catholicism became theofficial religion of the Palatinate. Because most of the population wereof Lutheran or Calvinist (Reformed) faith, this resulted in muchsuffering for many people. Other contributing factors to emigration from the area wereagricultural crises in the early 1700s and lack of adequate social policyto alleviate the varied problems of the populace. Perhaps it was a combination of these factors which led our JohannFriedrich Dietz to decide to bring his family to America--- to head downthe Rhine river to Rotterdam, and from there to set sail to Philadelphia. Emigrating Palatines came north on the Rhine river, paying fees at14 different customs stations, where they were frequently detained forweeks before being given clearance for further travel. Customs fees wereexcessive, and the cost of food and shelter on these forced delays washigh. Some parties of emigrants were backed financially by patrons;others sold all their possesions for necessary funds. Nevertheless, bythe time they reached Rotterdam, many of them were virtually penniless.Many boarded ships to America upon signing a contract with the ship'scaptain which promised repayment upon docking in America, either by arelative already there or by the redemptioner method. The redemptioner system offered free passage to America in exchangefor servitude to a master for several years without pay in return forreimbursement by the master to the captain for costs of passage. Eventhough the system was sometimes abused by the masters, it did offer anopportunity for the newcomers to get acquainted with the Americanenvironment, to learn the language, to acquire work skills, and toprepare for self-sufficiency at the end of the period of indenture. Ithas been estimated that at least half, possibly two-thirds, of Germandemigrants to America came on the redemptioner system. Since our Frederick was a tailor-- a person with a skill and aprofession-- perhaps he and his family did not have such a difficult timeas many of his fellow emigrants. We do know that he established hisfamily in Philadelphia, living out his long life there, and that he gavehis descendants firm roots in American soil....
* * * * * Johann Friedrich Dietz, our original German immigrant ancestor, wasborn in the Palatinate around 1718. He immigrated to Philadelphia,Pennsylvania, arriving on the ship Edinburgh on 15 September 1749. We mayassume that with him were his wife and family, including a young son alsonamed Johann Friedrich. They settled in the Southwark district of Philadelphia, whereFredrick pursued his profession as a tailor. We do not know the name ofhis wife, nor do we know how many children they had. We do know that theyhad at least two sons: (1) Johann Friedrich (also called Fredrick), who is our ancestor, and (2) Daniel. In Fredrick Dietz's will, dated 14 May 1808 and recorded 3 March1814, he specified that upon his death his property, goods and chattelswere to be sold and the residue to be divided equally amongst hisgrandchildren, the children of his sons Fredrich and Daniel: Solomon and John Dietz, sons of Fredrich Dietz Michael and Fredrich, sons of Daniel Dietz. His son Frederick (ourancestor) had died by 1808, and his son Daniel probably had alsopre-deceased him, as had several of his grandchildren. The 'inventory of good and monies belonging to Frederick Dietz ofthe district of Southwark in county of Phi March 15, 1814' attached tothe will follows: Cash received from the managers of alms house....$91.22 also 2 pair Sugar Thongs (sic) 8 Silver Tea spoons one large wallnot (sic) chest ' German Bible a mahogany Tea chest now in my care, Peter Lavell Johann Friedrich Dietz's burial is listed in Cemetery Records for Philadelphia 1803-1886, 1939 WPA Records, Dept. of Records, StateArchives, as follows: Deats, Frederick Feb. 1814 age 85. Burial German Lutheran However, the ages of his grandchildren would indicate that JohannFriedrich Dietz lived well beyond the age 85 given here. He was probablycloser to 95 when he died in February 1814!
* * * * * Johann Friedrichl Dietz's burial is listed in Cemetery Records forPhiladelphia 1803-1886, 1939 WPA Records, Dept. of Records, StateArchives, as follows: Deats, Frederick Feb. 1814 age 85. Burial German Lutheran. However, the ages of his grandchildren would indicate that JohannFriedrich' Dietz lived well beyond the age 85 given here. He was probablycloser to 95 when he died in February 1814!
Sources: Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Ship Edinburgh 15 September 1749 1790 and 1800 U.S. Census Records Last Will and Testament of Frederick Dietz, Register of Wills, City HallAnnex, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Cemetery Records for Philadelphia 1803-1886 1939 WPA Records, Dept. ofRecords, State Archives, Roll 4 D to ESS - received from BonnieDietz Baker, Dayton, Ohio
OLD FAMILY TRADITIONS
My grandfather (Chrystal Frederick Dietz) told my brother Dietz McAbeethat the first Dietzes in America were Hessian soldiers brought over by the British to fightagainst the Colonists. They laid down their arms because they wereoffered land grants in Pennsylvania. -Maybelle McAbee Bates
My mother (Lula Dietz Pierce) told me that the first Dietz who came overto America from Germany was named Frederick and that he was a tailor. Hewas married to a Susan Baker, and they lived in Philadelphia. --SharonPierce Schier '


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