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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Catherine Morden: Birth: 1766 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 1786 in Northampton, Pennsylvania

  2. Jane Morden: Birth: 1767 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania.

  3. John Morden: Birth: 21 JAN 1768 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 24 JAN 1832 in Westinster Twp., Middlesex Co., Ontario

  4. Moses Morden: Birth: 1769 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 1837 in W. Flamboro Twp. Wentworth, Ontario

  5. Ralph Morden: Birth: 1770 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 31 JAN 1796

  6. Eleanor Morden: Birth: 16 SEP 1771 in Mt. Bethel, Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 21 APR 1850 in Niagara Twp., Lincoln Twp, Ontario

  7. Elizabeth Morden: Birth: 1773 in Easton, Pennsylvania. Death: 2 MAY 1812 in Niagara Twp, Lincoln Twp., Ontario

  8. James Morden: Birth: 1775 in Bethel Twp., Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: OCT 1840 in W. Flamboro Twp. Wentworth, Ontario

  9. Nancy Ann Morden: Birth: 1776 in Mt. Bethel, Northhampton, Pennsylvania. Death: 1 OCT 1814 in Burlington Plains, Niagara Co., Ontario

  10. Anne Nancy Morden: Birth: 1777 in Bethel Twp., Northampton Co., Pennsylvia. Death: 24 DEC 1834 in Ontario


Notes
a. Note:   DEATH: Ralph Morden (1742-1780), was hanged in the US for helping Robert Land escape, his wife Ann came to Canada and settled in the area around London, which is where Robert Land had settled.
  BIOGRAPHY: Ralph Morden was born in England in 1742 and probably came to Pennsylvania with his father, George, the following year to settle with his family 40 miles above Philadelphia. Nothing more is known of Ralph until 1761 when he appears as a single man on the tax assessment for Mt. Bethel twp., Northampton Co., Penn. Ann Durham's family came to Mt. Bethel from Bucks Co. Ralph appears on the tax lists in Mt. Bethel from 1765 to 1779. In 1769/70 he was given land beginning at Yeo. Reynell's (James Reynolds) line in Northampton Co. The tax return of Mt. Bethel in Jan 1775 shows he had 100 acres of land of which 10 were cleared and 5 sowed, plus 2 horses and 3 cattle. He did not seem to prosper because his land tax in 1779 was the same as it was earlier. Perhaps he was too busy as a woodsman than a farmer or laborer and did not take the time to improve his farm. He roamed far and wide in northern Penn. and New York, and perhaps stopped, among other places, to visit his brother, Joseph, in the Mohawk Valley. In the meantime, Robert Land - a friend of Ralph's - had been carrying expresses for the British Army and had even carried express to Niagara from Gen. Sir Henry Clinton in 1779. After returning home Robert was confined, condemned and released on bail. Land jumped bail and on May 12, 1780, Ralph Morden was caught red-handed in what appeared to be a treasonable enterprise--helping Robert Land, an "old offender", to flee the country. It is improbable, however, that either Morden or his captors expected at the time of his capture that he would be hanged for his offense. All the traditional accounts by either the Mordens or the Lands state that Morden gave himself up voluntarily, although it was late in the day when they were surprised and he might have escaped as Land did. Unfortunately, Land's long record of service to the British now counted heavily against Morden, who was in greater danger than he realized. His trial began Oct 30, 1780, at Easton, Penn. less than fifty miles and 2-1/2 years from the Wyoming Valley massacre where the Fields had joined Butler's Rangers and the Iroquois. Morden's lawyer was Edward Burd, brother-in-law of Mrs. Benedict Arnold! Ralph was condemned to death for treason on Nov 9 and the date of execution was set for Nov 25, 1780. It is an interesting point that of the four men who were hanged for treason in Penn. during the Revolution, three, including Ralph, were Quakers. Ordinarily, judges and juries were more lenient with fighters than with people who claimed to be pacifists. Perhaps that generalization applies in this case. Robert Land made his way to Ft. Niagara as had the Fields in 1778. A few years later his family joined him. When told of the plight of Ann Durham Morden and her family, Land sent for them and they arrived in 1787, with the exception of two who took the Patriot side in the war. It is interesting to note that the US hung an innocent man for treason and honored one of his descendants - namely Charles A. Lindbergh. The French pronounced the name of Morden as "Maudant"
  BIOGRAPHY: Source:Crysler Family by R.M. Crysler History of Town of Dundas, Ont. by Dundas Historical Society Death notices of Ontario by Reid The Loyalists in Ontario p224-230 Morden Genealogy by Aletha Arnold & Pearl Tegerdine
  BIOGRAPHY: Misc. Notes BIRTH: Morden Genealogy by Arnold & Tegerdine; FHL film 0982259 item 2 MARRIAGE: Centennial Book for West Flamboro, Ontario, 195? at 10. DEATH: The Treason of Ralph Morden and Robert Land by John M. Coleman; The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol LXXIX at 439-451 (1955) Paid taxes/assessments in Mt. Bethel Twp, Northampton, PA in 1761 as a single man, also paid taxes in 1765-1779. FHL films 021680/2/4/5. Granted land by Pennsylvania Propritaries 1769-70 in Northampton Co, PA beginning at Yeo Reymell's [James Reynold's] line 100 acres cleared. A certificate of names to be taxed in Mr. Bethel Twp for the Hunter Settlement - Jan 1775 [source: The Scotch-Irish of Northampton Co. at 522] fifth name down from James Durham. The account of the trial of Ralph Morden mentions that he and his wife Ann had 8 children. Came to America on a pleasure trip with other companions of noble birth, and being pleased with the aspects of the country in New Jersey, (now PA), purchased a large tract of land there as early as 1742. There he married Ann Durham. When troubles arose which culmimated in the Revolutionary War in the colonies, he being a Quaker, would not fight, and put himself under the protection of a British officer [Robert Land?]. He lost his life, following which calamity, his widow with their five children migrated to Canada. Ralph Morden had belonged to a noble family in England, his father being an earl, but no family record tells that the brave widow was assisted by their noble relatives in the care and support of her family. She was evidently a woman of great force of character, and with her family settled at Dundas, County of Wentworth, Ontario, enting 400 acres of land given her by the English government in recognition of the fact that the father was an United Empire Loyalist. Ann Durham was a cousin of Governor-General Durham of Canada. Ralph MORDEN Sex: M Birth: 1742 in Yorkshire, England Death: 25 NOV 1780 in Easton, Northampton, PA MISC: LABEL1: hanged for treason Note: BIRTH: Morden Genealogy by Arnold & Tegerdine; FHL film 0982259 item 2 MARRIAGE: Centennial Book for West Flamboro, Ontario, 195? at 10. DEATH: The Treason of Ralph Morden and Robert Land by John M. Coleman; The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol LXXIX at 439-451 (1955) Paid taxes/assessments in Mt. Bethel Twp, Northampton, PA in 1761 as a single man, also paid taxes in 1765-1779. FHL films 021680/2/4/5. Granted land by Pennsylvania Propritaries 1769-70 in Northampton Co, PA beginning at Yeo Reymell's [James Reynold's] line 100 acres cleared. A certificate of names to be taxed in Mr. Bethel Twp for the Hunter Settlement - Jan 1775 [source: The Scotch-Irish of Northampton Co. at 522] fifth name down from James Durham. The account of the trial of Ralph Morden mentions that he and his wife Ann had 8 children. Came to America on a pleasure trip with other companions of noble birth, and being pleased with the aspects of the country in New Jersey, (now PA), purchased a large tract of land there as early as 1742. There he married Ann Durham. When troubles arose which culmimated in the Revolutionary War in the colonies, he being a Quaker, would not fight, and put himself under the protection of a British officer [Robert Land?]. He lost his life, following which calamity, his widow with their five children migrated to Canada. Ralph Morden had belonged to a noble family in England, his father being an earl, but no family record tells that the brave widow was assisted by their noble relatives in the care and support of her family. She was evidently a woman of great force of character, and with her family settled at Dundas, County of Wentworth, Ontario, enting 400 acres of land given her by the English government in recognition of the fact that the father was an United Empire Loyalist. Ann Durham was a cousin of Governor-General Durham of Canada.



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