The Phillips, Weber, Kirk, & Staggs families of the Pacific Northwest

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  • ID: I05201
  • Name: Olaf II "The Fat" King of NORWAY , Saint 1 2
  • Sex: M
  • ALIA: Olaf /Haraldsson/, King of Norway
  • Birth: ABT 995 in Norway 2
  • Birth: 992 3
  • Death: 31 AUG 1030 in Slain fighting King Canute of England at Stiklestad 4 2
  • Note:
    St. Olaf II, called Olaf 'The Stout' during his lifetime, 1st Christian King of Norway, b. ca. 995 (posthumously), patron saint of Norway, with Aethelred II fought Danes in England, tore down London Bridge (commemorated in nursery rhyme "London Bridge is falling down"), fought in western Europe, became sole ruler of Norway and forcibly Christianized inhabitants, slain during eclipse of 31 Aug 1030 at Stiklestad fighting Knut (Canute), King of England and Denmark, buried Trondheim; m. Feb 1018 (1) Astrid, daughter of Olaf Skotkonung, 1st Christian King of Sweden, d. 1021/22. [Ancestral Roots, line 243a-21]

    ------------------------------

    OCCUPATION: 1st Christian King of Norway, Patron saint of Norway, with Aethelred II fought Danes in England, tore down London Bridge (commemorated in nursery rhyme "London Bridge is falling down"), fought in western Europe, became sole ruler of Norway and forcibly Christianized inhabitants, slain during eclipse of 31 Aug 1030. He was born abt 995, posthumously Patron Saint of Norway.

    MISC: Age at death: About 35.

    In his early youth, he was a viking. Then he was in the service of the exiled King Ethelred II of England, and, at that time, became a Christian in Rouen. He returned to Norway in 1015 where, recognized as a descendant of King Harald I, he displaced the ruling earls and became king. He created a strong central government. He promoted Christianity, building churches throughout Norway. By 1025, he was more powerful than any previous Norwegian king.

    In 1028, Canute II, king of Denmark and England, invaded Norway. Many local Norwegian chieftains, who were against Olav because of his forceful rule, sided with Canute II. Olav was forced to take refuge, and went to Russia. In 1030, he returned to Norway with an army, but was defeated by a peasant army, and was killed at the Battle of Stiklestad.

    One source says that he Jumped into Baltic Sea near Rugen Island, Germany.

    ----------------------

    The following extensive information was contained in a post-em by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann AT yahoo.com:

    "Death: 31 AUG 1030 in Slain fighting King Canute of England at Stiklestad "
    Date of 29 Aug 1031 is more likely & Canute instigated, but didn’t participate. Olaf was trying to unite Norway & the local chiefs & landholders headed by Kalv Arneson, Hårek av Tjøtta and Tore Hund (who were being supplanted in Olaf’s scheme & being bribed with silver by Canute) led a farmers army against Olaf.

    Death: 29 Jul 1030 [Ref: Catholic Ency, Ency Britannica, Moriarty p53 & 171, Turton] 29.VII (31.VIII) 1030 [Ref: ES II:108 & 114] 1030 [Ref: Watney #745], place: battle of St. Klestadt (sic) [Ref: Moriarty p171] Stiklestad, Norway [Ency Britannica] fell on the battlefield, battle of Stiklestad [Ref: Catholic Ency] battle of Stiklestad in Trøndelag [Ref: Norwegian history: http://www.lysator.liu.se/nordic/scn/faq63.html#top]

    It is now: Stiklestad (on the Trondheimsfjord near Verdal), Nord Trøndelag (county), central Norway.

    "Torstein Knarresmed cut King Olav with the axe, and the cut hit the left leg above the knee. Finn Arnesson immediately killed Torstein. But after receiving the wound the King supported himself against a stone, threw the sword and prayed to God for help. Then Tore Hund stabbed him with his spear; the stab came below the mail coat and entered the abdomen. Then Kalv cut him and the cut hit the left side of the neck.... These three wounds killed King Olav." See: Snorre Sturlason’s Heimskringla SAGA OF OLAF HARALDSON relating the battle of Stiklestad & death of Olaf online at:
    http://users.ev1.net/~theweb/Heims-27.htm

    "One source says that he Jumped into Baltic Sea near Rugen Island, Germany"
    That source is confusing St. Olaf Haraldsson with Olaf Tryggvesson who is thought to have died this way between the island of Rügen & Peenemünde, Pomerania (now Mecklenburg-Pomerania, northeasternmost Germany).
    See:
    http://libertynet.org/~viking/nlet0105.htm

    Here is a little more info & 2 bios:

    Not tall, but middle sized, stout, and strong, light brown hair, and red and white complexion. His eyes were particularly fine, beautiful and piercing, so that one was afraid to look him in the face when he was angry. Olaf was very expert in all bodily exercies, understood well how to handle to bow, and to throw the spear; he was a great swimmer, and hand at smith's work. [Ref: Watney 745]

    Olaf II Haraldsson, b. c. 995, d. July 29, 1030, Stiklestad, Norway; feast day July 29, also called SAINT OLAF, Norwegian HELLIG-OLAV, the first effective king of all Norway and the country's patron saint, who achieved a 12-year respite from Danish domination and extensively increased the acceptance of Christianity. His religious code of 1024 is considered to represent Norway's first national legislation.
    The son of the lord Harald Grenske and a descendant of the Norwegian ruler Harald I Fairhair, Olaf was reared as a pagan and became a Viking warrior in the Baltic region. He fought against the English in 1009-11 but assisted the English ruler Ethelred (Aethelred) II the Unready against the Danes in 1013. When the Danish king Sweyn (Svein) I gained the advantage in England, Olaf went to Spain and also to France, where he was baptized (1013).
    Returning to Norway in 1015, Olaf conquered territory that had previously been held by Denmark, Sweden, and the Norwegian earl Haakon of Lade; by 1016 he had consolidated his rule in all Norway. In the succeeding 12 years he built his base of support among the aristocracy in the interior and pressed relentlessly for the acceptance of Christianity, using missionaries he brought from England. The Church of Norway may be dated from 1024, when Olaf and his ecclesiastical adviser, Bishop Grimkell, presented a religious code at Moster.
    Olaf resolved his conflict with the Swedish king Olaf Skötkonung by 1019 and joined forces with the king's son Anund Jakob when Canute, king of England and Denmark, threatened to conquer Norway. Canute's control of the trade routes to the west of Norway, and the prospect of his ruling more indirectly than Olaf had done, won the support of leading Norwegian chieftains. Canute forced Olaf to flee to Russia (1028), where the Norwegian ruler took refuge with his Swedish wife's relatives at Kiev.
    Olaf attempted to reconquer Norway in 1030 with help from Anund Jakob but was defeated by a superior Norwegian peasant and Danish army in the Battle of Stiklestad (1030), one of the most celebrated battles in ancient Norse history. Olaf's popularity, his church work, and the aura of legend that surrounded his death, which was supposedly accompanied by miracles, led to his canonization in 1031. His popularity spread rapidly; churches and shrines were constructed in his honour in England, Sweden, and Rome. He was the last Western saint accepted by the Eastern Orthodox church. [Ref: Ency Britannica]

    St. Olaf Haraldson, Martyr and King of Norway (1015-30), b. 995; d. 29 July, 1030. He was a son of King Harald Grenske of Norway. According to Snorre, he was baptized in 998 in Norway, but more probably about 1010 in Rouen, France, by Archbishop Robert. In his early youth he went as a viking to England, where he partook in many battles and became earnestly interested in Christianity. After many difficulties he was elected King of Norway, and made it his object to extirpate heathenism and make the Christian religion the basis of his kingdom. He is the great Norwegian legislator for the Church, and like his ancestor (Olaf Trygvesson), made frequent severe attacks on the old faith and customs, demolishing the temples and building Christian churches in their place. He brought many bishops and priests from England, as King Saint Cnut later did to Denmark. Some few are known by name (Grimkel, Sigfrid, Rudolf, Bernhard). He seems on the whole to have taken the Anglo-Saxon conditions as a model for the ecclesiastical organization of his kingdom. But at last the exasperation against him got so strong that the mighty clans rose in rebellion against him and applied to King Cnut of Denmark and England for help. This was willingly given, whereupon Olaf was expelled and Cnut elected King of Norway. It must be remembered that the resentment against Olaf was due not alone to his Christianity, but also in a high degree to his unflinching struggle against the old constitution of shires and for the unity of Norway. He is thus regarded by the Norwegians of our days as the great champion of national independence, and Catholic and Protestant alike may find in Saint Olaf their great idea.
    After two years' exile he returned to Norway with an army and met his rebellious subjects at Stiklestad, where the celebrated battle took place 29 July, 1030. Neither King Cnut nor the Danes took part at that battle. King Olaf fought with great courage, but was mortally wounded and fell on the battlefield, praying "God help me". Many miraculous occurrences are related in connection with his death and his disinterment a year later, after belief in his sanctity had spread widely. His friends, Bishop Grimkel and Earl Einar Tambeskjelver, laid the corpse in a coffin and set it on the high-altar in the church of St. Clement in Nidaros (now Trondhjem). Olaf has since been held as a saint, not only by the people of Norway, but also by Rome. His cult spread widely in the Middle Ages, not only in Norway, but also in Denmark and Sweden; even in London, there is on Hart Street a St. Olave's Church, long dedicated to the canonized King of Norway. In 1856 a fine St. Olave's Church was!
    erected in Christiania, the capital of Norway, where a large relic of St. Olaf (a donation from the Danish Royal Museum) is preserved and venerated. The arms of Norway are a lion with the battle-axe of St. Olaf in the forepaws.
    Sources: STORM, "Snorre Sturlason's Olav den Helliges Saga"; MUNCH, "Det norske Folks Historie"; SARS, "Udsigt over den norske Historie"; DAAE, "Norges Helgener"; OEVERLAND, "Illustreret Norges Historie" (not reliable); VICARY, "Olav the King and Olav King and Martyr" (London, 1887).
    Author: NIELS HANSEN; Transcribed by John Looby [Ref: Catholic Ency (New Advent online)] Note: Christiania is the old name for Oslo... Curt

    For a longer bio, see: http://www.katolsk.no/biografi/olav/english.htm

    Regards,
    Curt




    Father: Harald "The Greenlander" Underking of VESTFOLD b: ABT 940 in Grenland, Telemark, Norway
    Mother: Estrid (Asta\Asted) GUDBRANDSDOTTIR b: ABT 970 in Uplands, Vestfold, Norway

    Marriage 1 Alfhild b: ABT 998 in Norway
    • Married: in No Marriage ?
    Children
    1. Has Children Magnus I Olafsson "The Good" King of NORWAY b: ABT 1018 in Norway

    Marriage 2 Astrid (Edstrid) of SWEDEN b: ABT 1000 in Sweden
    • Married: FEB 1017/18 2
    • Married: 1028 5
    Children
    1. Has Children Ulfhilde (Gisela) Princess of NORWAY b: ABT 1023 in Norway

    Sources:
    1. Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Page: 40, 103
    2. Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
      Page: 243a-21
    3. Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Page: 103
    4. Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Page: 103
      Text: 1030
    5. Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
      Page: 40
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