The Phillips, Weber, Kirk, & Staggs families of the Pacific Northwest

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  • ID: I03983
  • Name: Alan FITZFLEALD , Lord of Oswestry 1 2
  • Sex: M
  • ALIA: Alan /FitzFlaald/, Baron of Oswestry
  • Birth: ABT 1078 in Dol, St Malo, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France 3
  • Death: AFT 1122 in Oswestry Castle, Shropshire, England 4
  • Note:
    Alan fitz Fleald or Flaald; feudal Baron of Oswestry, Sheriff of Salop 1101; founder of Sporle Priory, Norfolk by 1122; married Aveline, daughter of Arnulf or Ernulf, Seigneur of Hesdin, Picardy, a large land-holder in England 1086. [Burke's Peerage]

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    In the time of William the Conqueror, Alan, the son of Flathald (or Flaald) obtained, by the gift of that King, the castle of Oswaldestre, with the territory adjoining, which belonged to Meredith, Prince of Powys ap Bleddyn, King of Powys. This Alan, having m. the dau. and heir of Warine, sheriff of Shropshire, had, in her right, the Barony of Warine, and was s. by his son, William FitzAlan. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 200, Fitz-Alan, Earls of Arundel, Barons Maltravers]

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    LITCHAM.

    Netherhall Manor.

    Part of this town was a beruite, or manor depending on the capital manor or honour of Mileham, held by Stigand Archbishop of Canterbury, a lay fee in his own right, and was deprived of it by the Conqueror, and farmed of him by William de Noiers; 4 carucates of land belonged to it, 9 villains and 11 borderers, and 5 servi, with 4 acres of meadow, 2 carucates in demean, and 9 amongst the tenants, only 5 at the survey, but the rest might be recovered, also 2 socmen with 4 acres and a half of land, one runcus, one cow, and 16 swine, 104 sheep, and 20 goats, and was valued in Mileham.

    Soon after this, Alan, son of Flaald, to whom the Conqueror granted the manor of Mileham, had also this with it as an appendix to, or part of, the said manor. This Alan was ancestor of the noble family of the Fitz Alans Earls of Arundel, and lords this manor and of Mileham, to which town, for an account of them, I refer the reader.

    Alan granted it to Sewald, with the hundred of South-Greenhow, and Launditch, to hold of him and his heirs; of this Sewald was John Le Strange, descended... [An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 10, Francis Blomefield, 1809, Pages 9-14]

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    The following information was provided in a post-em by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann AT yahoo.com:

    Jim, a "baron" or a "Breton" or both?

    a Breton of Owestry [Ref: Moriarty]

    obtained the castle of Oswaldestre, co Salop, with an extensive fief in Shropshire, early in the reign of Henry I [Ref: CP V:391]

    founded Spode Priory, in Norfolk, as a cell of St. Sammur, in Brittany [Ref: Watney #919]

    Breton; Seneschal of Dol & in 1138-55 sheriff of Salop (Shropshire); Held Oswestry until taken by Welsh [Ref: Adrian Channing 11 Aug 2002]

    Alan FitzFleald, who married Aveline de Hesding. [Ref: Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage, FitzAlan (of Oswestry), Volume 5, page 391: http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/cp/vol3.shtml]
    Flaald's son Alan in turn had three sons, Jordan, William and Walter. [Ref: "The Stewart Kingdom of Scotland, 1371-1603," by Caroline Bingham, Barnes & Noble, 1974]

    Alan (Alain Fitz Flaald), the son of Flathald (or Flaald), having participated in the Conquest, obtained by the gift of King William the Conqueror, the barony and castle of Oswaldestre, Salop, and Milcham, Norfolk, some of which belonged to Meredith, Prince of Powys ap Bleddyn, King of Powys. He received the shreivalty of Shropshire from King Henry I. and died circa 1114. While his parentage is more or less obscure, there is evidence to show that Flaald, his father, lived in Brittany and was a brother of Alain, seneschal of Dol, descended from the old Armonican counts of Dol and Dinan. This Alan, having married Adeline daughter and heir of Warine, Sheriff of Shropshire, had in her right, the Barony of Warine, and was succeeded by his son, William.

    The following is quoted from Crispin and Macary, "Falaise Rolls," pg. 2: "Alain Fitz Flaald came to England at the Conquest in 1066 and was baron of Oswaldestre, Salop, and Mileham. He received the shreivalty of Shropshire from Henry I and died circa 1114. Wace in recording "Sire de Dinan," undoubtedly referred to him. While his parentage is more or less obscure, there is evidence to show that Flaald, his father, lived in Brittany and was a brother of Alain, seneschal of Dol, descended from the old Armorican counts of Dol and Dinan. Alain Fitz Flaald was also the father or grandfather of William Fitz Alan, steward to David I., King of Scotland, ancestor of the Stuarts, kings of that country. Alain Fitz Flaald was also the father of William Fitz Alan, to whom Henry II. gave in second marriage Isabel de Say, baroness of Clun, the greatest heiress of Shropshire. He was ancestor of John Fitz Alan, who married Isabel, sister and co-heiress of Hugh d'Albigny. Upon a division of Hugh's property at his death in 1243, the castle of Arundel was assigned to John, son of the aforementioned John and Isabel, who thus became the first earl of Arundel of the Fitz Alan line. This property eventually passed to Mary, daughter and heiress of Henry Fitz Alan, who carried it, together with the earldom and the barony of Maltravers, to her husband Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, in which family it still remains. Alain Fitz Flaald and his wife Adeline were benefactors to the Norfolk priory of Castle Acre, early in the reign of Henry I." [Ref: McBride2]

    Fitz-Aleyn. The first bearers of this great historical name were the sons of Alan Fitz-Flaald, Baron of Oswaldestre in Shropshire and of Mileham in Norfolk, who received from Henry I. the shrievalty of Shropshire, and died about 1114. No one exactly knows who he was. Eyton, after a close and laborious investigation of the question, has adopted the legend found in the fanciful Booke of Hector Boece, who believed he had discovered in him the grandson of Banquo, the murdered Thane of Lochaber.* The names of Fleanchus and Flaaldus are, as he argues, easily convertible; and he states that when Fleance fled from Scotland about 1050, he took refuge at the court of Gruffyth-ap-Llewellyn, and fell in love with Gruffyth's daughter Guenta, who became his wife, and the mother of Alan. The author of The Norman People brings evidence to show that Flaald, his father, lived in Brittany, and was a brother of Alan, Seneschal of Dol, descended from the old Armorican Counts of Dol and Dinan. At all events, whatever may have been the origin of Alan Fitz Flaald, he was "The mighty Father of our Kings to be," for, from his second son, Walter Fitz Alan, appointed Steward or Seneschal to David I. of Scotland, sprung the royal House of Stuart. The elder son, William Fitz Alan, was the progenitor of the Earls of Arundel, and received from Henry II. in second marriage Isabel de Say, Baroness of Clun, the greatest heiress in Shropshire. His name must have been a later addition to the Roll; for Alan Fitz Flaald, who survived the Conquest for nearly sixty years, must have been far too young a man when he fought at Hastings to have had a grown-up son by his side. Nor do either William or Walter occur in Domesday , where we find only Ricardus filius Alann entered as a sub-tenant in Norfolk.

    * Shakespere alludes to this story in Macbeth, when the witches foretell the future greatness of his race to Banquo: "Thou shall get kings, though thou be none." [Ref: Adrian Channing 21 May 2002 citing: The Battle Abbey Roll, 1889, p41-42]

    ...the traditional account was Alan Fitz Flaad was the grandson of Banquo. In an exhaustive manner, Eyton concludes there is no evidence to support or deny the traditional account, but that there is some circumstantial evidence to support the grandson of Banquo theory. However, J. Horace Round in his Studies in Peerage and Family History - Origin of the Stewarts p. 115-146, showed that this is incorrect. Alan Fitz Flaad came from Brittany, the son of Flaad, Dapifer of Dol. The connection to Banquo is completely false. [Ref: Joe Cochoit
    Regards,
    Curt




    Father: Fleald (Flaald) FitzAlan Dapifer of DOL b: ABT 1046 in Dol, St Malo, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

    Marriage 1 Aveline de HESDIN b: ABT 1076 in Hesdin, Artois/Pas-de-Calais, France
    • Married: ABT 1105
    Children
    1. Has Children William FITZALAN , Lord of Oswestry b: ABT 1105 in Oswestry Castle, Shropshire, England
    2. Has Children Walter FITZALAN , 1st High Steward of Scotland b: ABT 1106 in Dol, Ille-et-Vilaine, St Malo, Bretagne, France

    Sources:
    1. Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
      Page: 1985
      Text: Alan Fitz Fleald (or Flaald)
    2. Title: Some Corrections and Additions to the Complete Peerage, www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/cp/index.shtml
      Page: V:391 FitzAlan (of Oswestry)
      Text: Alan FitzFleald
    3. Title: The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, by Lewis C Loyd, 1999
      Page: 27-28
      Text: place only-no date
    4. Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
      Page: 1985
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