The Phillips, Weber, Kirk, & Staggs families of the Pacific Northwest

Entries: 46457    Updated: 2015-06-11 05:23:07 UTC (Thu)    Owner: Jim Weber

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  • ID: I00078
  • Name: John CHIPMAN , Elder 1 2 3
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 3 JUN 1621 in Dorchester, Dorset, England 1 4 5
  • Birth: 1614 in Brinspittal, Dorchester, Dorset, England
  • Death: 17 APR 1708 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA 1 6
  • Event: Bullet 1631 IMMIGRANT on the "Friendship"
  • Event: Bullet MAY 1637 IMMIGRANT 7
  • Burial: Sandwich, Barnstable, MA
  • Occupation: Carpenter
  • Note:
    1.A Chipman Genealogy, by John Hale Chipman III, 1970.
    Page: 6 ID: I429
    Name: Elder John Chipman

    Occupation: Carpenter
    Birth: 1620 in Dorchester, Dorset, England
    Death: 7 APR 1708 in Sandwich,Barnstable County,Massachusetts
    MAY 1637 Emigrated from England to Massachusetts
    Arrived in Plymouth, Mass abt Jul 1637.
    Was in Yarmouth 1647 and Barnstable 1649.
    May have returned briefly to England in 1641-2.
    Moved to Sandwich in 1689.
    Father: Thomas Chipman b: ABT 1596 in England
    Mother: _____ _____ b: ABT 1596 in England

    --------------another take on the immigration & birth of John------------

    Marriage 1 Hope Howland b: 30 AUG 1629 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
    Bassett-Preston Ancestors
    10. ELDER JOHN1 CHIPMAN, son of Thomas, was born in Brinspittal, Dorsetshire, Eng., about 1615. He was left fatherless early and sailed from Barnstable, Eng., in the Friendship in 1631. After eleven weeks of foul weather he landed in Boston. He settled in Plymouth, 1631; removed to Yarmouth, 1646, and in 1649, to Barnstable. Deputy, 1663-6, 1668-9; a ruling elder in the church at Barnstable, 1670; selectman several years. He was appointed with three others to attend meetings of the Quakers to try to turn them from the error of their ways.

    He married in 1646, Hope Howland, who was born in Plymouth, Aug. 30, 1629, the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland. She died Jan. 8, 1683, and is buried at Lothrop Hill, Boston. He married, second, Ruth (Sargent) (Winslow) Bourne, daughter of Rev. William1 Sargent, and widow of Jonathan Winslow and of Richard1 Bourne (who died in 1685).

    He moved to Sandwich in 1679 and lived there until his death, Apr. 7, 1708, and was buried in the old cemetery at Sandwich. His widow died in Sandwich, Oct. 4, 1713, aged 71 years. He had ten married children and eighty-two grandchildren, nearly all of whom married and had children.
    Page 63


    The inscription on his wife's gravestone reads:--

    Here lyeth
    Interred ye body of
    Mrs Hope Chipman
    Wife of Elder John Chipman
    Aged 54 years
    who changed this life
    For a better
    Ye 8th of Jan. 1683

    -------------another take on the immigration of John----------------------

    John Chipman "is interred in the original cemetery beside his second wife, Ruth. His grave marker is well preserved and easily legible. Reference has been made that he lived a few years during his youth with his uncle Christopher Derby who was prosperous at the time. He probably made provision for John to attend some sort of school where he learned to read and write. His popularity in later years indicates a cosmopolitan nature which foundation was earned in a healthy environment of the rich farming country which is Dorset. It is evident that he early absorbed the rudiments of farming, animal husbandry and poultry care. He was a good carpenter to which his many buildings attest. Growing up in that lush country, he developed the stamina, physique and fortitude which he manifested in his New England home. There is no likeness of him extant. However, we do know that most men of that time were short in stature, were ruggedly built with strong constitutions. The long length of life under rugged conditions proves this point. Refer to the specifications of the ship 'Mayflower' where head room between decks was suitable for people not taller than five feet, eight inches (5' 8"). Perhaps the physical description of John's grandson, the Rev. John (#6) may give us some hint of the appearance of this first John Chipman. Some families cite that over the years certain Chipman traits have remained constant and are recognized in many of the kin today.

    John and his older cousin, Richard Derby, sailed from Barnstaple, Devonshire, Eng. for the new world about May 1637 when he was seventeen years of age. In clement weather, the crossing of the Atlantic usually took about six weeks so we may estimate that he arrived in either Boston or Plymouth harbor during the summer of 1637. Some records say in the month of July and aboard the ship 'Friendship'. However, no ships roster or other authoritative document has yet come to light confirming this report. But, up to 1850, he was the only man of the surname Chipman to come to New England. . . From 1637 to 1641, it is recorded that he was occupied as a carpenter erecting homes. One source indicates he may have worked for two years in Yarmouth with his cousin. Now, the Amos Otis papers (p. 156) states, 'In Aug. 1643 he was absent from the colony, or was sick and unable to bear arms, but, it appears he was afterwards a resident of Plymouth.'

    Research undertaken within the past three years in Dorset by Joan Brocklebank, indicates that perhaps John returned to Dorset to comply with the law by signing the Protestation Returns of 1641-42. Each male was compelled to reassert his fidelity and loyalty to the King as the only lord of the realm and head of the Church of England. Failure to be proven is, 'Did John return to seek redress about his inheritance?' which was due him, his father having died twenty years earlier? In any case, he returned to Plymouth and married Hope Howland in 1646."

    "It was at the Rocky Nook home of John and Elizabeth Howland that presumably John Chipman wooed, won and married Hope Howland. An authority on Barnstable history [Miss Alice Beale] states that for the first three years, they probably rented home quarters while he plied his carpentry trade in Plymouth. But in 1649, they moved to Barnstable, Mass., having 'that year, bought the homestead owned by Edward Fitzrandolphe' the deed of which is in the records at Barnstable. The land included eight acres, bounded on the north by the County Road, presently Route 6A, east by the Hyannis Road, extending across the present line of the Railroad (now extinct), south by the commons and on the west by the homestead of George Lewis Sr. The deed also conveyed a garden spot and orchard on the north side of the County road. . . "




    Father: Thomas CHIPMAN b: 1567 in White Church, Dorchester, Dorset, England
    Mother: Agnes SYMONDS b: ABT 1600 in Dorchester, Dorset, England

    Marriage 1 Hope HOWLAND b: 30 AUG 1629 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA
    • Married: 13 SEP 1646 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA 8 9 10
    Children
    1. Has Children Lydia CHIPMAN b: 25 DEC 1654 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA

    Sources:
    1. Title: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations, by Susan E. Roser
      Page: 86
    2. Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Clarence Almon Torrey
      Page: 151
    3. Title: The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol I-II, Robert Anderson, NEHGS, Boston 2000
      Page: 1020-24
    4. Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Clarence Almon Torrey
      Page: 151
      Text: 1614?, 1620, and ca 1621 are given
    5. Title: Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families, published in Barnstable, 1890
      Page: related by cousin Beverly Marston
      Text: about the year 1621
    6. Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Clarence Almon Torrey
      Page: 151
      Text: year only
    7. Title: Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families, published in Barnstable, 1890
      Page: related by cousin Beverly Marston
    8. Title: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations, by Susan E. Roser
      Page: 86
      Text: circa 1646 (year only)
    9. Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Clarence Almon Torrey
      Page: 151
      Text: ca 1646
    10. Title: The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol I-II, Robert Anderson, NEHGS, Boston 2000
      Page: 1020-24
      Text: by 1646
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