Nicholson

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  • ID: I1787
  • Name: James William Augustus NICHOLSON
  • Surname: NICHOLSON
  • Given Name: James William Augustus
  • Prefix: Rear Admiral
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 10 Mar 1821 in Dedham, Mass.
  • Death: 28 Oct 1887 in New York, New York
  • _UID: 2EA08F6F9731D5118680EF90A100BA0B65EC
  • Note:
    Admiral James William Augustus Nicholson (1821 Dedham, MA-1887 New York City)

    1. Admiral James William Augustus Nicholson participated in Mathew G. Perry's Japanese Expedition of 1853. During the Civil War, he commanded the ISAAC SMITH, SHAMROCK, MANHATTAN AND MOHONGO. As an Admiral, he commanded a European Station from 1881 to 1883. During the British bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt, in 1882, he rescued the records of the American Consulate, and evacuated many American and European officials. He received numerous commendations and awards,
    both at home and abroad, for his operation.

    2. Johnson, Rossiter, ed. , Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, - Vol. I-X (10). , Boston, MA: The Biographical Society, 1904. . "

    NICHOLSON, James William Augustus, naval officer, was born in Dedham, Mass., March 10, 1821; son of Nathaniel Dowse Nicholson, U.S.N., and grandson of Samuel Nicholson U.S.N. (q.v.). His father served in the war of 1812. James entered the U.S. navy as midshipman, Feb. 10, 1838; was promoted passed midshipman in 1844, and served as acting master in the war with Mexico, 1841-48. He was promoted lieutenant in 1852 and served on the sloop Vandalia, on the expedition to Japan under Commodore Perry, 1853-55, and in the Chinese rebellion. He cruised along the coast of Africa in suppressing the slave trade, 1857-60, and in 1861 was on board the Pocahontas and went to the relief of Fort Sumter, but arrived after the surrender, April 13, 1861. He commanded the Isaac Smith in the Port Royal expedition and took part in the battle of Port Royal, S.C., Nov. 7, 1861, where he was commended by Admiral Dupont for his coolness and gallantry. He served in Florida in the capture of Jacksonville, Fernandina and St. Augustine, and was assigned to the command of St. Augustine. He repulsed a Confederate flotilla on the Savannah river in February, 1862, was promoted commander, July 16, 1862, and served as ordnance officer on the New York station, 1862-63. He commanded the Shamrock in the South Atlantic blockading [p.70]squadron, 1863-64, and the monitor Manhattan, under Admiral Farragut, in the battle of Mobile Bay, where he engaged the Confederate ram Tennessee, Aug. 5, 1864. He bombarded Fort Powell for twelve days and after a siege of six weeks captured Fort Morgan. He commanded the U.S. steamer Mohican of the Pacific squadron, 1865-66; was promoted captainin July, 1866; commanded the U.S. flag-ship Lancaster, of theBrazil squadron, 1871-72, and was promoted commodore in 1873. He was commandant of the U.S. navy yard at Brooklyn, N.Y., 1876-80; was appointed to the command of the European station, Sept. 1, 1881, and was commissioned rear-admiral, Oct. 1, 1881.He was present at the bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt, by the British fleet, July 11, 1882, and on July 14th he landed 100 marines to protect the U.S. consulate, thus incidentally affording protection to many other refugees, and a gold medal was presented him by the king of Sweden in recognition of his services. He was retired, March 10, 1883. He died in New York city, Oct. 28, 1887.".

    3. Obituary
    The Late Rear Admiral
    J.W.A. Nicholson

    New York Times
    November 2, 1887


    Rear-Admiral Nicholson died at his late residence in this city was one of our most efficient and distinguished naval officers and belonged to a race of heroes. His grandfather, Commodore Samuel Nicholson, was one of the first officers commissioned by the Continental Congress, was the first commander of the celebrated frigate Constitution (Old Ironsides) and was at the head of the navy at the time of his death. Lieutenant N.Dowse Nicholson, his father served with distinction in the last was with Great Britain. He died early. On his mother's side he was a lineal descendant of Sir John Leaverett, the first Lieutenant-Governor of Massachusetts who had served in the Army of Cromwell. Admiral Nicholson was born in Dedham, Mass. on March 10, 1821. He entered the Navy as midshipman on February 10, 1838. After passing through all the grades he was commissioned Admiral in 1881. As midshipman and lieutenant he served on all the stations in the four quarter of the war Vandalia on a Japanese expedition under Commander Perry, and was stationed as guard for six months at Shanghai. From 1857 to 1860 he was on duty on the African coast for the suppression of the slave trade. In 1861 he volunteered to be one of the party to relieve Sumter and arrived off Charleston bar in time to see the interior of Sumter in flames and the white flag hoisted. Early in 1861 he was executive of the Pocahontas engaged with Confederate batteries on the Potomac River and Achuna Creek and aiding in protecting Washington. Was in the Dupont Port Royal expedition and received high commendation from Admiral Dupont in his report to the department. In the battle of Port Royal he displayed two of his characteristics coolness and courage. He rendered important services at Fort Pulaski. Fernandina. St. Mary's and Jacksonville. In 1864 he was assigned the command of the monitor Manhattan for the west Gulf blockading squadron under Admiral Farragut.The Manhattan headed off the ram Tennessee, and the only shots which penetrated the ram were fifteen inch guns of the Manhattan, and caused the surrender of the Tennessee. The Manhattan bombarded Fort Powell for twelve days, tearing it to pieces and Fort Morgan from August 9-12 when it surrendered. In 1865 had duty on the Pacific Navy Yard, which he administered, with great efficiency, making many improvements. On the 10th of October, 1881 he sailed from New York to take command of the European station. At the bombardment of Alexandria he displayed his usual judgement and humanity, assisting, at the request of the Khedive, on extinguishing the fires, burying the dead lying about the streets, taking on board all seeking protection, 130 refugees, landing 100 marines guarding the consulate, and himself visiting it and the burning district. His courage was proverbial, but he never allowed it to outrun his judgement, ever performing more than his duty, and obeying every order without demur. He was passionately devoted to his country and conspicuously evinced it in the late civil was. He was sincere, reticent, Nobel, and most humane nature. On one side most gentle and affectionate, on the other strong, brave. In his most intimate and endearing relations he was devotedly loved as well as honored and admired. He has been thanked and received acknowledgement from different continental sovereigns for his humanity to their subjects. His wife survives him.
    sarah1thomas@yahoo.com

    3. 1850 New York Census

    Listed in New York City

    Occuaption: U.S. Navy

    There is a "Ellen B. Nicholson", age 24, on the line above James. His first wife before Mary Heape Martin.

    There is a "William H. D. Nicholson", age 4, listed.

    Census

    New York City

    Sarah Berrian 58 b. NY
    Sarah " 54 b. NY
    Maria Hopkins 27 b. NY
    Samuel J. Hopkins 30 b. NJ
    George G. Hopkins 4 b. PA
    Ellen B. Nicholson 24 b. NY
    James W. A. Nicholson 28 U.S. Navy b. MA
    William H. D. Nicholson 4. b. NY
    Ann Kredengurgh 42 b. NY
    Mary Hughs 21 b. Ireland
    Mary A. Dadly 15 b. NY

    4. 1860 New York Census

    New York City

    Jas W. Nicholson 35 Naval Officer b. MA
    William " 13 b. NY
    Ellen T. 9 b. NY
    Sarah Berrian 71
    Sarah " 69(?)

    5. 1870 New York Census

    Nicholson, James 46 U.S. Navy $45,700
    " Mary 27 b. Ohio
    " William 22 U.S. Navy
    " Ellen 18
    1
  • Change Date: 25 Aug 2011 at 22:22:45



    Father: Nathaniel Dowse NICHOLSON USN b: 1790/1792 in Massachusetts
    Mother: Hannah Gray LEVERETT

    Marriage 1 Ellen Brasher BERRIAN b: 24 Jan 1826 in New York, New York
    • Married: 19 Feb 1846 2
    Children
    1. Has Children William Henry Drake NICHOLSON b: Jan 1849 in New York, New York
    2. Has No Children Ellen Theodora NICHOLSON b: 11 Jul 1851 in New York, New York

    Marriage 2 Mary Heape MARTIN b: Aug 1844 in Ohio
    • Married: 20 Aug 1862 in St John's Church, Washington, D.C. 2

    Sources:
    1. Title: Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, - Vol. I-X (10).
      Author: Johnson, Rossiter, ed.
      Publication: Boston, MA: The Biographical Society, 1904.
      Text:

      NICHOLSON, James William Augustus, naval officer, was born in Dedham, Mass., March 10, 1821; son of Nathaniel Dowse Nicholson, U.S.N., and grandson of Samuel Nicholson U.S.N. (q.v.). His father served in the war of 1812. James entered the U.S. navy as midshipman, Feb. 10, 1838; was promoted passed midshipman in 1844, and served as acting master in the war with Mexico, 1841-48. He was promoted lieutenant in 1852 and served on the sloop Vandalia, on the expedition to Japan under Commodore Perry, 1853-55, and in the Chinese rebellion. He cruised along the coast of Africa in suppressing the slave trade, 1857-60, and in 1861 was on board the Pocahontas and went to the relief of Fort Sumter, but arrived after the surrender, April 13, 1861. He commanded the Isaac Smith in the Port Royal expedition and took part in the battle of Port Royal, S.C., Nov. 7, 1861, where he was commended by Admiral Dupont for his coolness and gallantry. He served in Florida in the capture of Jacksonville, Fernandina and St. Augustine, and was assigned to the command of St. Augustine. He repulsed a Confederate flotilla on the Savannah river in February, 1862, was promoted commander, July 16, 1862, and served as ordnance officer on the New York station, 1862-63. He commanded the Shamrock in the South Atlantic blockading [p.70]squadron, 1863-64, and the monitor Manhattan, under Admiral Farragut, in the battle of Mobile Bay, where he engaged the Confederate ram Tennessee, Aug. 5, 1864. He bombarded Fort Powell for twelve days and after a siege of six weeks captured Fort Morgan. He commanded the U.S. steamer Mohican of the Pacific squadron, 1865-66; was promoted captainin July, 1866; commanded the U.S. flag-ship Lancaster, of theBrazil squadron, 1871-72, and was promoted commodore in 1873. He was commandant of the U.S. navy yard at Brooklyn, N.Y., 1876-80; was appointed to the command of the European station, Sept. 1, 1881, and was commissioned rear-admiral, Oct. 1, 1881.He was present at the bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt, by the British fleet, July 11, 1882, and on July 14th he landed 100 marines to protect the U.S. consulate, thus incidentally affording protection to many other refugees, and a gold medal was presented him by the king of Sweden in recognition of his services. He was retired, March 10, 1883. He died in New York city, Oct. 28, 1887.
    2. Title: Sarah Thomas tomyco@pacbell.net
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